a few more golf ones

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Mark
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I'm quite surprised that you didn't get shouted at for shooting on the back swing (or maybe you did) given that you are so close in (150mm focal length or so).
 
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martinxr2
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martin
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I'm quite surprised that you didn't get shouted at for shooting on the back swing (or maybe you did) given that you are so close in (150mm focal length or so).
It my son, and it was only a practice round with him and his pal. They wanted a few pics, plus they had the air pods in.
Dont do the back swing during comps, only on practice rounds where they hit 2 balls sometimes and that when i take them.
 

KIPAX

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KIPAX
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It my son, and it was only a practice round with him and his pal. They wanted a few pics, plus they had the air pods in.
Dont do the back swing during comps, only on practice rounds where they hit 2 balls sometimes and that when i take them.
Fait enough but if I may a bit of advice...
The problem I find with that approach is that unless you explain it then nobody knows and anyone who looks at your golf pics will just think your not doing it right and probably wouldnt want you on there course.... for that reason I tend to stay totally away from the backswing even when I know the players would be OK with it...
 
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Craig
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With silent-shutter mode being more common in both mirrorless and DSLR cameras, the distraction of the photographer’s click should no longer be an issue.
 

KIPAX

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With silent-shutter mode being more common in both mirrorless and DSLR cameras, the distraction of the photographer’s click should no longer be an issue.

You still have the same problem I point out in my last post :)
 
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1, the problem here is that your eye goes to the tree, it's the brightest thing in the frame, and your golfer is in shadow. Also, the view from behind isn't very interesting.

2, the sign is horrendous, get the shutter speed up and re-compose the pic

3, not a good frame for golf action

4, the club is literally cutting his face in half

5, badly timed (far too late), badly composed (ultra wide shots can of course work, but not when framed like that)
 
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Craig
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You still have the same problem I point out in my last post :)
Presumably you are saying that pro photographers would frown upon shots taken on the backswing? However, those very same people should be fully aware of the PGA Tour Photography Guideline which states “Silent photography equipment must be used when taking a picture during a player’s swing at any time.”. Technically, any shot of a player’s swing taken with a mechanical shutter is no longer allowed. Therefore, whilst what you said was valid some years ago, times are changing. When people become familiar with the ‘modern’ guidelines they will hopefully be more accepting of shots taken at any point in the swing. ;)
 
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David
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I photograph professional golf from time to time and have shot at the top of the backswing using a mirrorless on silent quite a bit - to be quite honest the 'it's not done and people will think you've done something wrong' notion is somewhat outdated - professional golfers and more particularly caddies are very sensitive to sudden sounds but don't give a damn if you don't make a sound, and more of them than you might imagine are aware that a lot of cameras can be silent nowadays.
 
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martinxr2
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martin
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cheers for the comments.

on the back swing i only take them on the practice round and i tell the boys i'm going to with one shot as they usually tee off 2 balls.
 
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