1. Matt

    Matt Staff Member Admin

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    If you have a new item of equipment, then do a review! It doesnt have to be magazine length, but an honest review based on your use experience is what we want!

    Post your review in this forum, and we will also add it to the front of site.(y)
     
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  2. Bachs

    Bachs

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    I finally took delivery of the BG-E3 battery grip for my 350D this morning.

    I will be writing a full review on it as soon as I get through my backlog of RAW files!

    There's a distinct lack of pics on the net of the grip fitted to the body so I will be including a full set of images.

    I can tell you, I am really pleased with it, it adds much needed size, weight and handleability to the camera, oh and I nearly forgot, extra battery life!

    It is quite a strain on the keyring attached to my belt now though! :LOL:
     
  3. CT

    CT TPer Emeritus

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    Don't you just love opening parcels? :D

    The battery grip is a great accessory. :thumb:
     
  4. Bachs

    Bachs

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    The postman gave his usual half hearted knock on the door and immediately posted the 'collect on Monday' notice.
    I sat on the edge of the estate for 20 minutes waiting for him to return to his van.

    I had a stinger laid accross the road and a rocket launcher aimed at his van.

    There was no way he was leaving without parting with that parcel :D
     
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  5. Marcel

    Marcel Kim Jong Bod Staff Member Admin

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    If anyone would like to write a review of any kit they own, then it would be more than welcomed.

    It doesn't have to be wordy, even a few notes about your experiences and thoughts with your equipment will help. Would possibly give others an insight into real world experiences :)

    If, also, you've already written anything, then you're very welcome to post it.
     
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  6. Jonny

    Jonny

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    There's one on the books for my 430ex soon enough, just need to peice it together :thinking:
     
  7. snoop69

    snoop69

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    Ive just done a little review on a battery grip from Hong Kong but
    i do not have the permissions to post it :( :LOL:
     
  8. Marcel

    Marcel Kim Jong Bod Staff Member Admin

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    Thanks snoop, just post it in another forum and hit the RTM button and we'll sort it :)
     
  9. snoop69

    snoop69

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  10. PsiFox

    PsiFox Prefers Mac over PC any day

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  11. snoop69

    snoop69

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    Thanks bud - missed that :wacky:

    Marcel,feel free to clean up this thread ;)
     
  12. Grendel

    Grendel POTY Winner 2007

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    I've got a 50D. It's nice :D
     
  13. CT

    CT TPer Emeritus

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    And still no pics - looks like I'm gonna get some pics up before you do. ;)
     
  14. Sebastian

    Sebastian

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    Hi guys,

    Can I post link to reviews on my blog? Or does it have to be here? Plenty of pics to link :)
    Let me know :)

    Cheers,

    Seb
     
  15. Lenslocker

    Lenslocker

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    The Nikon V1 is marketed as a quality bridge camera, and it pretty much lives up to expectations. It has the characteristic solid feel that sets even entry level Nikons above their immediate competitors; The body is a compact chunk of kit which has a satisfying weight to it. The lenses which come with the kit likewise have the build quality you expect of Nikon and fit quickly and tightly to the body.

    As a DSLR user I deliberately tried to get stuck into the V1 without using the instructions, to see how easy the transition was. Assuming you’re happy to let the camera go full auto, you’re on safe ground here. Point and shoot is very easy, and the results will beat any compact camera you care to name. If you’re looking to go semi manual however, you might find that aperture and shutter priority are a tad more difficult to find than on your average DSLR. A quick shifty at the manual should sort that out.

    One of the V1′s selling points is the frame rate for stills. This is pretty impressive, rating at 60 fps flat out. The disadvantage here is that the shutter seems a little slow to fire off the first frame when you compare it to the speed once it’s going. Of course as this is a bridge camera you have to remember there isn’t actually a shutter anyway, which means once the camera is firing you dont get to see what you’re taking as the processor is busy getting images into the SD card, not throwing them up on the view screen for you. If you’re shooting sports you’ll find this makes it difficult to track your subject.
    Notwithstanding these slight issues, one you get down to viewing your images you’ll be impressed with the quality. You can shoot in jpeg, raw or both and the camera responds well in low light giving crisp nighttime shots as well as having a nice depth of field for daytime shots.

    One major issue I did have with the camera was the ability to carry it around like a compact. This is entirely possible but if you are going to be taking zoom shots and wide shots you’d be wanting to switch the lenses a lot. This is swift and easy but for me, it led to getting fed up with putting the kit into separate bags and therefore I kept the camera bare in my pocket. As a consequence I somehow managed to select ‘format’ on the memory card. It felt a bit too easy to accidentally select this rather final option and therefore I have to throw it in as a negative for the camera.

    In summary, a very good bridge camera, excellent picture quality and high frame rate leading to some lovely shots, but the menus are a tad easy to select by accident.
     
    Matt likes this.
  16. Jimbosyourman

    Jimbosyourman

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    Hi all I am new to this site. I have a canon 5d mark ii . I recently purchased a mint condition Sigma 80-400 EX DG to supplement my Canon 28-135 . Being in my 40's I have some old Tamron adaptable 2 lenses which were part of my old 35mm kit, a 60-300 (23A) f3.8-5.4 and an even older 200-500 (06A) f6.9 complete with a good vintage fungus.
    Anyway had afternoon to myself , not very nice out so got manfrotto tripod out and set up a scene indoors with some dried plants and waitrose reciept stashed in middle . Took pictures at 200, 300 and 400mm at f8, f11, f16, f,22. This is not a very scientific test and only really concerns centre sharpness at 100% crop.
    At 200 and 300mm the sigma could only beat the tamron 200-500 into third place almost irrespective of aperture . The 60-300 was considerably sharper than the other two. At 400 mm with only the ancient 200-500 to beat the sigma could at best only match the tamrons performance and at some aparatures was actually worse .
    The tamrons are obviously manual focus , however I allowed the sigma the luxury of focusing itself . All shots were taken in aperature priority, with a shutter delay to reduce shake. Oh and the image stabilizer was turned of on the sigma.
    Any ideas, has photographic lenses got worse? I was considering the purchase of a sigma 50mm f1.4 . Forget that now. Keen to hear other inputs and would be happy to forward my results to anyone who wants to have a look.
     
    Matt likes this.
  17. fstoparmy

    fstoparmy

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    can the reviews be in video format? for do they need to be text / pics?
     
  18. trevorjb1406

    trevorjb1406

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    Hi, I did a review of the Nikon D7100 on a squidoo page. If you would like to read it I will place a link below. It not only covers the camera but also some lenses and lighting equipment and accessories. If anybody wants a review of anything let me know and I will see if I can produce one for the forum.
    http://www.squidoo.com/nikon-D7100-35mm-dslr-camera-review and-price
     
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  19. trevorjb1406

    trevorjb1406

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    Hi Marcel, I will produce a review for the forum next week on my own kit and perhaps some shots taken in my small studio here at home and some in a pro studio...would that be good?
     
    Matt likes this.
  20. GrantWilson

    GrantWilson

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    did a video review of my X-T1
     
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  21. brihalbach

    brihalbach

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    Recently just bought 5D mark iii with a canon 24-70mm f/2.8. Moved up from a sony alpha camera. I couldn't be happier with my purchase. I can boost the ISO quite high without a loss of quality. The autofocus on the lens is great. The amount of options available is a little overwhelming. But that is my own fault for not knowing how to use it yet. I don't think I will need a new camera body for quite a long time.
     
    Matt likes this.
  22. ProG77

    ProG77

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    Bought a HP Photosmart 7520 printer. £100 (down from £150) at Currys. Really impressed.

    Very easy to set up (took about 25 mins but the printer screen guided most of the steps) and connect to the home wifi network and e-print is brilliant. Can now print wirelessly from iMac, laptop, iphone/ipad wirelessly. All in 1 - printer, copier, scanner and fax and does double sided prints. Separate tray for photo paper - printed one 6x4 as a test and must say, really good quality photo print. Good for occasional photo printing but for printing in any volume, will stick to online as I can't imagine the cost/print will be as competitive as what I can get online. Printer was supplied with 1st full set of cartridges and I believe the cost of the full replacement is around £30.
    Overall, really pleased with the printer so far and for the price I paid, it's not bad!
     
  23. Stevie-

    Stevie-

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  24. ILovetoShoot

    ILovetoShoot

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    After taking the Panasonic TZ40 for a walk around London recently we finally had a chance to test the low priced, pocket sized, gadget packed Panasonic.

    First off, here’s what we liked about the camera:

    The Zoom: Take a look at the pictures and you’ll see five images starting at (35mm equivalent) 24mm (wide) and zoom in to 480mm. The image quality is excellent at 480mm considering the sensor size. There is a little noise but detail is pretty good. Normally we would recommend to never use the full zoom on a compact like this as image quality is always rubbish but it’s actually quite acceptable on the TZ40. Why would you need to use it? On a beach with lots of bikini clad women, maybe ;)

    The Touch Screen: If you press the button on the main screen to the right (the one with a little finger on it) the TZ40 will allow you to take photos by simply touching the screen. By doing this, the camera will focus on anything you want to take a picture of and then capture your image. This is an awesome feature and is very useful if you don’t feel like focusing and then recomposing your shot.

    The Build Quality: A good solid weight and nice to hold in your hand. This camera feels robust and would probably take a few knocks along the way. It weighs 198g with battery and memory card and provides a nice stable support for taking pictures. Meaty but not too heavy; great for your jacket pocket.

    Shutter speed time delay: We really liked the speed you can take a picture with this camera. Press the shutter and the picture is taken. It’s that quick. Previous digital compacts we’ve owned and tested are awkward when taking pictures of family and animals etc. because if something moves then the image is blurred.

    The Image Quality: Not amazing for low light photography as there is the usual noise, but we found taking pictures in daylight to be a nice surprise. Colours are vibrant and bold although the temperature does seem a little cold at times (Nothing that an editing program couldn’t handle). The 1/2.3-inch MOS Sensor is tiny compared to DSLR sensors but the image quality is clear and sharp, even in the shadows.

    Battery Life: Lasted all day with the flash used frequently and still had two bars left out of three. That’s what we like!

    And here’s what we disliked:

    The menu system: Can be a little annoying at times to navigate through various settings and find your way around to change shutter speeds and apertures etc .

    Tiny Buttons: If you have large fingers – good luck. The ‘tiny’ buttons take some time to get used to and are suited for a more petit women rather than blokes with bigger digits.

    Wifi: Couldn’t get this to sync with our phones or computer to transfer images no matter how hard we tried. A visit to the Panasonic shop might be beneficial!

    The ‘Power On’ Button: We kept our TZ40 in a neoprene case and found that it kept turning itself on when we were putting it away. The power button seems to be very sensitive and when the camera turns on, the lens pops out. Not great when you’re meeting your girlfriend for lunch – “is that a camera in your pocket or are you just pleased to see me?”


    All in all we really dug the TZ40. We would recommend it to anyone looking for an affordable camera that has many awesome features. We rate this 8/10.

    Who would use it most?

    1. People who like to travel and see the sites. It is extremely versatile as it has GPS so users can track where they took pictures and WIFI (when it works) to upload images on the go to Facebook or whatever you like.

    2. Families looking for a reasonably priced camera to take shots of their kids at school and parties or just on days out etc.

    3. Someone who owns a DSLR but wants a pocket sized camera for times when the bigger bulkier camera just isn’t an option.
     
    Matt likes this.
  25. Ajf350d

    Ajf350d

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    E-PL5

    Bought the twin lens kit just over a month ago.

    It has replaced an EOS 600D now and so far I am really impressed with it.

    Image quality in my opinion is at least as good as the 600D and I also feel it is more capable of capturing/retaining detail in very bright highlights.

    The menu system could be better explained in the manual though. I’ve found quite a few options by playing rather than reading! Having said that accessing the major settings such as ISO, aperture and shutter speed is fast and easy, particularly once you enable the advanced control panel.

    Overall easier to access options quickly compared to the 600D for me.

    Touchscreen focus and shoot is great, especially for macro and almost does away with the need for a remote shutter release.



    The kits lenses are fine image quality wise but nothing outstanding. Let down for me would be the maximum aperture on them, especially the 14-42mm as I like to use narrow dof for many of my shots. The 40-150mm is generally good and its AF seems to be pretty accurate even at max zoom. Build quality it feels a little flimsy and doesn't give me huge confidence, but probably fine. At least it keeps the weight down!



    In fact with the body and all my lenses they take up less room and weight than my 600d and just a couple of lenses did!

    This was the main reason for changing and has made going out for a day far more enjoyable now I haven't got a massive rucksack to look out for.



    Cons.

    The batteries don't last as long as the 600D, but I've purchased some Duracell compatibles as extras.

    The LCD, like all of this type is not ideal on bright sun, especially if you want to focus manually. I will try out an anti-reflection protector and a clip on hood once they arrive.

    Possibly less accurate at auto focussing on moving subjects due to the type of system used, but I have got some decent shots so far and practice on the best way to use the AF system should improve the count of 'good' shots.

    Manual focus ring on the kit lenses is electronic so has no start and end point so you cannot manually gauge or check distance.



    New lenses.

    I sold the rest of my Canon equipment to by some extra lenses.

    60mm macro. A very nice lens to use. It has a useful focus limiter switch which you can set for either close shots, distance, or full range. WF is fast and accurate making it reasonably easy to get good very close shots handheld.

    Manual focus ring is electronic but it does have a distance scale which is very helpful. This is also a very good lens for general use and portraits or animals.

    The maximum f2.8 aperture is great for narrow dof and low light of course.

    75-300mm mkII

    With an equivalent 600mm on 35mm cameras at the long end this is an ideal lens for air shows, wildlife or motor sport, where the zoom range also comes in handy.

    I've also used it for selective shots of flowers.

    As you would expect from a long lens, at full zoom you really need to watch shutter speed to avoid blur and camera shake on shots. The image stabiliser on the E-PL5 definitely helps though. I managed a shot at full zoom and 1/80th second which whilst slightly blurred, was certainly usable.

    On a tripod, the images very sharp at both ends of the zoom. Slight downside is the maximum aperture is only f6.7 at full zoom, but that is comparable to similar sigma and canon lenses on aps-c bodies.

    Olympus are believed to be releasing an f4 300mm prime in a year or so too.

    Final lens I got was the 12-40mm from Olympus.

    This is classed as a 'pro' range lens and it does show. The build is. Wry sold being virtually all metal. The zoom system feels far more solid and positive. The manual focus also is interesting. It can be used as the others with a constant turning electronic ring.

    However, if that is slid back it changes to work like a mechanical focus ring. There are stops at either end of the focus range, it also adds a distance scale and the feel changes to that of a mechanical system.

    This also has a maximum aperture of f2.8 and with a very close minimum focus it can create some fantastic narrow dof shots of plants and flowers the 'bokeh' is also very smooth, creating some very nice dreamy shots in bright light conditions.



    Conclusions.

    I don't miss my Canon gear from a purely practical or quality point of view at all.

    There is no denying that the 'slr' part has its benefits over an LCD only system but I found it easy to adjust in most circumstances.

    Subconsciously I think I still feel a bit like I am using a 'toy' camera compared to the chunky 600d and my big 100-400 zoom and a couple of events I have been to I felt when I was trying to get shots there was slightly less acknowledgement from fellow photographers than having my dslr.

    I think though there is still a general feeling among some photographers that CSCs are not 'serious' cameras.

    I disagree completely with this and at the end of the day it is the pictures that count and this system is more than capable of producing them.
     
  26. WillNicholls

    WillNicholls

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  27. Beardy

    Beardy

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    Yjuyjujju
     
  28. mbscad

    mbscad

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    Nikon Nikkor AF-S DX VR 55-200 f4-f5.6 G IF-ED
    full review and resolution tests here http://www.photozone.de/nikon--nikk...-200mm-f4-56g-if-ed-dx-vr-review--test-report
    I have just bought one and I'd like to share my opinion of this lens.
    For a 55-200mm zoom it's very small and light (100mm long x 73mm dia and weighs 336g)
    It's plastic throughout including the lens mount but that doesn't bother me.
    It's quite old now (I think introduced about 2007) and pricewise it cost me £118 new in proper Nikon box with hood and storage pouch.
    I have used it for a couple of days to try it out and have some pictures to post to give you some idea.
    General Shot
    [​IMG]
    HousesS
    by mbscad on Talk Photography
    Taken at 55mm Iso200 1/1600sec at f5.
    Detail at 200mm
    [​IMG]
    PigeonS
    by mbscad on Talk Photography
    Taken at 200mm Iso200 1/800sec at f5.6
    [​IMG]
    FurS
    by mbscad on Talk Photography
    Cat fur details taken at 200mm Iso200 1/1250sec f5.6
    [​IMG]
    SpireS
    by mbscad on Talk Photography
    A Church spire about 3/4 mile away taken at 200mm Iso200 1/800sec f5.6
    The biggest problem with this lens is that it's small (52mm objective) so it needs a bright day to be effective. I've used it with VR (vibration reduction) on and off and it didn't seem to make a lot of difference even though I'm used to the Canon IS system which I used to use all the time.
    My conclusion is it's fine for occasional shooting when you need more range than the standard kit lens, build quality is fine, works as designed but it's slow to focus (maybe 1/2 sec) it needs a fast shutter speed and VR won't save you beyond about 2 stops (if that).
    Would I buy it again? NO but then again I have a Canon 70-200f4LIS to do any heavy lifting I need (which is six times the price S/H).
    I hope someone out there find this of use (It's my first time trying to add a review).
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2015
  29. gothgirl

    gothgirl

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    Canon 50mm 1.8 MK II (Plastic Mount) V Canon 50mm 1.8 STM

    A quick review of the STM, compared to the 50mm 1.8 II (Plastic Fantastic)

    • It's a bit bigger that the original sized one,it's still a small lens and shouldn't affect most people but if you store your lenses in protective cases or sleeves like I do, then it might not fit in it anymore, if you travel with this as a carry around, bare that in mind for your bags.
    • It's faster at focusing, it also seems to have a much better focusing mech.. such as trying to focus on a white subject on a white background, it picked it up a lot quicker quicker.
    • It's a lot quieter, there is still some noise there, but no where near as much of the plastic WHIIRRRRRR you get with the MK II
    • It seems better made all in all , you get the feeling holding it that it might survive if you dropped it, whereas with the MK II I was scared every time I took it on and off the body that It might break
    • It's not soft wide open, it's pin sharp at 1.8... See enclosed pics.
    And see me, happy banana with this decision :banana:

    I'm going to post a quick review of the 18-55 IS STM compared to the standard 18-55 IS when I get chance too :)

    Photos

    Hedgehog - 50mm 1.8 MK II ( Plastic Fantastic)
    22420158849_0bcc6a0e4e_o.jpg

    Snake - 50mm 1.8 STM
    IMG_4814.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2016
  30. gramps

    gramps

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    AF-S Nikkor 300mm f4E PF ED VR

    AF-S: Silent Wave Motor
    E: Electronic Diaphragm (*see below for camera compatibility)
    PF: Phase Fresnel
    ED: Extra Low Dispersion Glass
    VR: Vibration Reduction

    For a number of years the Nikon 300mm f4 AF-S has been seen as a high IQ, good value 300mm prime lens, used by many for motorsport, air-displays, wildlife etc.
    Primarily an FX (full frame) lens it is designed for use with the more recent range of Nikon cameras that can cope with the new electronic diaphragm which provides for more accurate auto-exposure control.
    The lens was first released in January 2015 but immediately came under the spotlight for its apparent inability to benefit from its VR at low shutter speeds. This was a serious issue as of course VR is designed for stability at low shutter speeds and this new lens claimed a VR benefit of up to 4.5 stops! A recall was made and supply was paused until the matter was rectified by a new firmware which was announced during March/April 2015, (*** affected lenses were serial numbers prior to 205101).

    WEIGHT

    I bought this lens in November 2015 and was immediately amazed at the lightness of the lens, at just 1.7lbs (755gm) it is almost half the weight of the earlier 300mm f4 AF-S and considerably lighter than the 300mm f2.8 AF-S (VR). Having this new 300 f4 attached to either my D7200 or D810 is like having a camera equipped with a small walkabout lens. There is no stress in using this lens attached to the camera, I could use it handheld all day with no problem at all.
    The lens does not come with a tripod foot, Nikon can supply one for around £160:00 (!!!) or you can pick up a ‘clone’ from eBay for around £20. For me the only reason to have a tripod foot would be to use the lens on a tripod but being frank I can’t see it ever being needed, the lens is so light that there is no more stress on the camera/lens connection than there would be with say a 24-70 f2.8 zoom.
    For me the lightness of this lens makes it a killer buy for anyone wanting to use a 300mm (or longer) lens without having any issues about carrying a heavy weight.

    IMAGE QUALITY

    This lens easily equals the image quality of the popular 300mm f4 AF-S but probably does not come up to the standard of the 300mm f2.8 AF-S (VR), which is legendary for its image quality.
    There has been some comment on the Phase Fresnel lens and its affect on bokeh when used against a strong light, some have reported a circular effect where the strong light appears, similar to the ‘doughnut’ effect common to mirror telephoto lenses, however I have not experienced anything like this in my use of the lens. The front lens element benefits from a fluorine coating.

    TELECONVERTERS

    The previous 300mm f4 AF-S worked very well with the TC-1.4E II in fact so well that it seemed that it had no effect other than to take the minimum aperture up to f5.6, the new lens is no different it works like a charm.
    On my 300mm f4 AF-S I found the TC-1.7E II to be a bit sluggish at times, by that I mean that the AF often struggled to keep up, especially noticeable with birds in flight. I have no such problems with the new lens and the TC-1.7E II and I have been very impressed with the image quality it provides.

    COST

    The older AF-S lens can be picked up used from around £450 or from £700-£1000 new.
    The 300mm f4 PF is priced from £1200-£1500 so not necessarily a cheap option if an older used AF-S model suits your needs. What is the killer value added point from this lens is its low weight, as said before it is a game-changer for me in carrying around and using a telephoto lens.

    CONCLUSION

    This lens will be perfect for anyone who wants to have a telephoto lens that can be carried around as easily as a walkabout short zoom, e.g. 24-70. Image quality is at least as good as its predecessor but the lightness and compatibility with TC’s makes it an outstanding upgrade.

    (*) Compatible camera bodies:

    D4 series, D3 series, Df, D810, D810A, D800 series, D750, D700, D610, D600, D300 series, D7200, D7100, D7000, D5500, D5300, D5200, D5100, D5000, D3300, D3200, D3100, Nikon 1 J1, J2, J3, J4 with FT-1, Nikon 1 V1, V2, V3 with FT-1, Nikon 1 S1, S2 with FT-1 (and newer bodies).



    Comparison size between old and new versions.

    [​IMG]
     
  31. tijuana taxi

    tijuana taxi

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    Gitzo GT1532 Mountaineer

    Having moved to the smaller and lighter Fuji system my series 3 Gitzo systematic was bit overkill and the search began for its replacement.
    I also owned an older series 1 Gitzo, its designation was a G1158 Mountaineer, very handy for travelling, but too short and light for an everyday tripod.

    After a reasonable amount of research, after all these things are not exactly cheap I settled on a Gitzo GT1532. This is a carbon fibre, three section, light (1.3kg), sturdy (smallest leg dia 18mm) portable (folded length 62cm) and relatively tall ( 133cm without centre column in use) tripod

    My first impression was very positive, if its function matches its looks we are onto a winner, it really is a thing of beauty.

    The leg locks are a big stiffer than those on my existing tripods, firstly because they are new and secondly because of the O rings that are new to this latest range. This will apparently help prevent crud entering the locks, sure I will find out in due course.Raising and lowering the legs is smooth and the locks need approximately half a turn to operate. Both locks can be operated together which makes putting up and taking down the tripod very speedy indeed.

    This next feature is new and makes removing the centre column for low level operation a doddle.First step is loosening the ring that sits below the head mount disc, then slacken off the centre column clamp (bit that looks like a wing nut) Now remove centre column leaving the head mount disc and centre column stub in place, last step is tighten “wing nut” All takes about thirty seconds and replacing it is opposite to the above, clever and very simple idea.

    Initial impressions are very positive; build quality appears to be excellent as does attention to detail. Even the screw-in carbon hook at the bottom of the centre column gets its own O ring.

    Only negative I suppose would be price, but that pain was lessened by the trade in offer of seventy pounds for any old tripod exceeding one metre in height when extended. Also once registered there is an extended five year warranty, admittedly not as generous as it once was. Obviously well worth doing and it also serves as a way to ensure you have bought a genuine product (don’t know if there are copies about, but daresay there are somewhere in this world of counterfeit goods)

    As mentioned at the start of this little review, I did look at other brands online and in person, but in my opinion Gitzo still manage to produce the best product. Yes they are expensive, but so are some of the clones, you pays your money etc etc as the saying goes.

    Once it has seen more use I will add my findings here and thanks for reading my comments
     
  32. Ricardodaforce

    Ricardodaforce

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    I have taken delivery of a nice new piece of kit, the DJI Osmo handheld 3 axis gimbal with X3 camera. That's 4K Ultra HD video recording or 12mp stills.

    In the box are a nice storage case, the Osmo handle, the X3 camera, carry strap, mobile phone holder and battery. The handle feels solid and well made, featuring buttons for record video, take a photo, a trigger to freeze camera orientation as well as various LEDs indicating what's happening. A folding mobile phone holder in attached in which you place your phone, which is then connected to the Osmo via a wifi connection. Control of the Osmo taken place via the superb DJI Go app.
    The camera is a slightly modified version of the X3 camera that comes as standard with the DJI Inspire 1 drone. The modifications are, the ability to lock the camera orientation for storage, and this camera isn't focused on infinity. If you do own the Inspire, you can use its camera on the Osmo handle.
    The DJI Go app provides a huge variety of settings, enabling you to tweak saturation, contrast, sharpness, resolution etc. It's all very easy to use and my first impressions are good.
    The Osmo/X3 combination retails for 549GBP.

    Some samples of what I have done so far are below:





    [​IMG]Cardiff Castle 360 Panorama by Ricardo da Force, on Flickr
     
  33. davidfleetphoto

    davidfleetphoto

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    David
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    Dave Semmens likes this.
  34. davidfleetphoto

    davidfleetphoto

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    David
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  35. davidfleetphoto

    davidfleetphoto

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    Name:
    David
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    Hi everyone,

    I've just added my Fuji XT2 review here
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2016
  36. Dave_S09

    Dave_S09

    Messages:
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    If you are looking for an affordable prime lens (as a first upgrade to your kit lens?) for a Canon dlsr forget about the Canon 50mm f1.8. Okay, it is a nice lens but there is a better one and whilst it is a little more expensive (only just mind) it blows the 50mm f1.8 out of the ball park. The lens I am referring to is the Canon 40mm f2.8 STM and it is reviewed in detail (together with some sample pics) here.
     
  37. Royroy1111

    Royroy1111

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    Roy
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    I've recently bought a Lee landscape polarised filter and I'm not that impressed,it think it hardy polararises at all.
     
  38. Dave70D

    Dave70D

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    Hi Ho Silver away !
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    If it`s ok, I will do a review tomorrow on the Sigma 150-600mm Contemporary lens.
     
  39. Dave70D

    Dave70D

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    Well I have Never done a review on anything, so I will put this one in my words of what I think.

    The Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Contemporary lens.

    I have had the Sigma C since last year as I wanted a longer lens for the reach as I was missing a lot of wildlife shots, ie only got a shorter lens. When I first put the sigma on my Canon 70D I thought omg this is heavy, as on a normal camera strap round the neck it can be a right pain if you are walking about for hours, so I got an Op/tech shoulder strap and it is now no pain at all. As members will know the lens zooms out to a max of 600mm so it is a great one to try and fill the frame, but try to get closer before you do zoom in on your subject. It is a very good clear and sharp lens that also has a Slide Lock to stop the zoom from moving on it`s own when hanging down, it has IS and C1-C2 so you can set either one for long focal or short focal. For me imo a Must have is the USB Sigma Dock, as if you know how too do it then you can set the lens to just your liking by tweek it all, ( I had a friend help me to do mine ). Yes the lens can feel heavy at times even with a shoulder strap as I walk for hours while up on the South Downs with it, but the sigma C is not weather sealed If you are not using the lens it does come with a great case for storing it. As I am not great with words, I will leave it at that, I enclose a couple of shots using the Sigma C with the Canon 70D, you can also get the same lens for Nikon DSLRs too.



    [​IMG]Hello Sweetie by David Ore, on Flickr



    [​IMG]Long Tailed Tit by David Ore, on Flickr



    [​IMG]Kestrel by David Ore, on Flickr


    Hope that I have done this right, I think it is a cracking lens that if you are in to sports/wildlife or airshows and you own a Canon or Nikon then I`d say you would be very happy with it, but remember to also get the sigma usb dock.
    @Marcel hope this is fine :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
  40. yamahatdm900

    yamahatdm900

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    5,034
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    Graham
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