Aperture won't work on MacOS 10.15+ So, what next, Capture One?

OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
... I'd also quite like to export all the edited versions from Aperture, although that can probably easily be done to an external drive.
OK, I am currently running the trial version of ApertureExporter, which is limited to 10 images in each folder. There do appear to be some useful options available:

Screenshot 2019-08-20 at 09.49.22.jpg

I do like the idea of TIFFs for higher rated images, and JPEGs for lower rated ones. That ETA time though is a hopelessly optimistic estimate; this trial run has been going for about 3 hours now (exporting to an external drive on a standard USB port, 2014 era), and is now estimating the ETA as 12 hours 40 minutes! There does not appear to be any way (that I can see) to run it on a subset, eg a set of folders... although, I suppose you could export that set of folders as an Aperture Library and run ApertureExporter on that.

One thing I had not quite appreciated is that ApertureExporter requires Aperture to work, so you definitely have to do this before Aperture stops working, ie before MacOS Catalina.

I have noticed various oddities in relation to file sizes, eg exported JPEGs being different in size from the sizes reported by Aperture. At the moment (since most images have had some adjustments in Aperture) I'm getting two files from each image, eg CB67A01A.jpg for the original and CB67A01A_WithAdjustments.jpg for the adjusted version. For that image, Aperture reports the file size as 1.95 MB, the original pixel size as 3300 × 2207 (7.3 MP), and the adjusted pixel size as 2154 × 3221 (6.9 MP)... it has been rotated and cropped (as well as straightened, 6 dust spots removed, and a Levels adjustment). ApertureExporter's "original" version is reported by Finder as 2 MB, and the adjusted version is 1.7 MB. While the file creation date is today, the Content Created date reported by Finder is March 1967, and it shows the device make and model as Plustek 7500i (my scanner). Interestingly, Finder shows the Content Creator as QuickTime 7.6.6.

At the moment, I think I'm probably going to pay the price to get the full version of Aperture Exporter, not least as an insurance policy. I'm hoping that for most adjustments, Capture One Pro will do a reasonable job. However, I believe that C1Pro does not transfer spot, repair and clone adjustments. Since the source of much of my library is from scanned negatives and slides, some over 50 years old, there are a lot of images with those adjustments. For them, I may be better ignoring the C1Pro imports and using the ApertureExporter adjusted versions instead. I haven't quite worked out how to do that yet.

Once this run is complete, I'm planning to do a trial import from my 2019 folder in C1Pro. I hope that will let me make up my mind before the current offer on the C1Pro Fuji version expires at the end of the month (TBH I think I'm pretty much committed to paying up now!).
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
One thing I forgot to mention, there have been quite a few errors reported on export. Sometimes the image wasn't available, sometimes (I think) they were Raws that Aperture couldn't deal with, some reported that IPTC information wasn't correctly exported, and I think I had a few files scanned in JPEG2000 format, that Aperture couldn't read anyway.
 
Last edited:
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
Well, the Aperture Exporter run finished in a little over 11 hours. If there really were 1024 folders (why do I find that number suspicious?), with up to 10 images transferred in each with the trial version, that would be up to 10,000 images. AE reported around 33,000 images, so a full run would presumably take around 33 hours.

The "ETA" time bottom left of the window above is pretty useless. When the Mac went to sleep while I was away doing other things, as far as I can see AE kept doing its job, but the ETA increased each time, before counting down again. At the end of the job it stood at nearly 24 hours, when it should presumably have counted down to zero.

Next task is to transfer a significant folder from Aperture to Capture One, using the latter's library import mechanism, and have a look at the results. I'm hoping that this will be a good enough basis for most images. I'm most worried about scans with significant dust removal adjustments. It would be good to use the AE-exported images for those cases, but I've yet to work out a reasonably automated way to do that (there are going to be many thousands of such images).

Is there an Aperture search that would let me select all the images in a folder with retouch adjustments?
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
Is there an Aperture search that would let me select all the images in a folder with retouch adjustments?
The answer to that one appears to be yes, there is!

Next task is to transfer a significant folder from Aperture to Capture One, using the latter's library import mechanism, and have a look at the results. I'm hoping that this will be a good enough basis for most images. I'm most worried about scans with significant dust removal adjustments. It would be good to use the AE-exported images for those cases, but I've yet to work out a reasonably automated way to do that (there are going to be many thousands of such images).
I was pretty sure I'd made reference to a useful post and video on this, but I couldn't find it on a quick scan through the posts above (links are quire hard to spot these days!). It is https://www.nikoncafe.com/threads/migrating-aperture-libraries-to-capture-one.315514/

The first thing he suggests is exporting your keyword structure from Aperture and importing it into Capture One; apparently this lets you preserve the keyword structure. I did this, although I didn't think I had a keyword structure. The import failed! It turns out that ApertureExporter ADDs keywords to images representing the albums they are included in; what's worse is that these keywords are structured, and also include characters ("|") not recognised by Capture One. There was also another error about an invalid indentation. I solved this eventually by going back to Aperture and deleting the set of keywords created by ApertureExporter (all helpfully structured under the keyword AE), which seemed to solve that. Second import of keywords worked.

I had already changed my most recent (2019) folder of film roll scans from managed to referenced images, as recommended. So next, export that folder as a temporary Aperture Library, go C1 and create a new temporary catalogue of the same name and import the temporary Aperture Library. Out of a thousand or so images, the import stopped for 5 images, which it said were not accessible. On closer inspection back in Aperture, it looked like those images were duplicates that ApertureExporter had renamed, and which were also on the offline disk where I had asked AE to store its results; furthermore the filenames of those duplicates had been changed by AE! The solution seemed to be to skip those on import. So far, so good I thought.

(So my message at this point is, ApertureExporter may be a very good thing, but definitely use it AFTER you've transferred your images into Capture One!)

However, when I came to open the projects imported, the first project had no images! In fact there were many projects with no images. These appear to correspond to projects derived from black and white films that I have scanned myself (I checked this by exporting one such project from Aperture as a Library and importing it into C1; no images were imported). At this moment, I have no idea why this is happening.

It looks like I could import these projects from the original scans, or perhaps preferably from the files created by ApertureExporter; indeed (since these are the most likely images to require spot removal adjustments) the latter might be the way to go, but it's a bit of a pain. I'm going to try to find out more why this might be happening from the C1 support website.

BTW I have no idea if this is interesting to anyone else, but I plan to carry on documenting this here anyway!
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
It looks like Capture One Pro will not import JPEG images where the Color Model is Gray. It successfully imports TIFFs or DNGs where the Color Model is Gray!

This is a PITA because I scan my black and white images as Gray JPEGs!
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
It turns out that ApertureExporter ADDs keywords to images representing the albums they are included in; what's worse is that these keywords are structured, and also include characters ("|") not recognised by Capture One. There was also another error about an invalid indentation. I solved this eventually by going back to Aperture and deleting the set of keywords created by ApertureExporter (all helpfully structured under the keyword AE), which seemed to solve that. Second import of keywords worked.

...

(So my message at this point is, ApertureExporter may be a very good thing, but definitely use it AFTER you've transferred your images into Capture One!)
After further work I realise that unchecking two boxes in the ApertureExporter startup page (make keywords for albums, and tag faces with keywords) should solve the problem of badly formed keywords.
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
It looks like Capture One Pro will not import JPEG images where the Color Model is Gray. It successfully imports TIFFs or DNGs where the Color Model is Gray!

This is a PITA because I scan my black and white images as Gray JPEGs!
Well. It turns out it's more complicated than that!

Most grey JPEGs (if you accept that short-hand... it means 8 bits per pixel) won't import. Some grey JPEGs and also grey TIFFs (16 bits per pixel) will import, but are not editable. Some grey-coloured JPEGs and TIFFs (with 24-bits or 48 bits per pixel, respectively) will import and are editable (these were produced by scanning negatives as positives, preparatory to inversion in different software). (There are other little wrinkles here that I don't completely understand, but have left out for simplicity.)

So that leaves me with thousands of black and white scanned images as 8-bit per pixel JPEGs. I am told you can convert these to 24-bit per pixel JPEGs in Photoshop (and presumably others such as Affinity Photo). However, for the nubers of images I have to deal with, that's not practical.

Does anyone know a way to carry out such a conversion in batch mode?
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
So that leaves me with thousands of black and white scanned images as 8-bit per pixel JPEGs. I am told you can convert these to 24-bit per pixel JPEGs in Photoshop (and presumably others such as Affinity Photo). However, for the nubers of images I have to deal with, that's not practical.

Does anyone know a way to carry out such a conversion in batch mode?
The best answer I've found, from another thread is xnconvert, available free in the Mac app store.
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
It looks like Capture One Pro will not import JPEG images where the Color Model is Gray. It successfully imports TIFFs or DNGs where the Color Model is Gray!

This is a PITA because I scan my black and white images as Gray JPEGs!
This may not have been quite accurate. Phase One suggest it's a feature (not a bug); Capture One Pro is designed to process colour only (ie RGB etc) and has no capability to edit images in Greyscale.

I have now managed to change all my Aperture images to being referenced, and to convert all (AFAIK) my greyscale images to RGB using xconvert. I have also worked out the parameters to scan future black and white images as RGB. Soon, I will attempt my first large scale import of scans into C1Pro.

This has taken on extra urgency, as Catalina has now been released, so there's always a chance that something will happen that will force me to upgrade!
 
Messages
5,086
Name
Richard
Edit My Images
No
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
I did see a reference to this, in Petapoxel or the like. It does leave me in quite a quandary. Obviously it would be good to just carry on indefinitely, but my guess is that this is only temporary relief. If I keep on with Aperture (which suits me very well), I'm just adding to the size of the image collection that has to be converted eventually. I'm guessing that many images will need some degree of re-working after migration. So if I keep working with Aperture and shoot another 50 films, that's another 2,000 images that might need further re-editing. If I do make the change now, those 2,000 images will get edited in C1Pro. That's what I'm currently telling myself, anyway.

OTOH I'm really struggling to get to grips with C1Pro, so the temptation is very real!

I've just spent most of the afternoon with one image from the 1960s with lots of dust spots, trying to work out how to remove them in C1Pro. Eventually worked out that the "dust removal" tool is very much aimed at dust on the sensor, and I need the "spot removal" tool instead, which actually seems to work.
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
Over the past few days, I've done a complete run on my Aperture Library with ApertureExporter, which I bought for C$19.99. I now have 33,000 images and 1,300 projects in the library. After about 11 hours, I reckoned it was around 2/3 finished. Rather than leave it running overnight, I decided to stop and re-start with the "Resume" option next morning.

*** Alert Klaxon *** Alert Klaxon ***

Do NOT do this! The resume mode goes through the entire library checking each image, and is nearly as slow as the export. I think it actually got to the point of exporting new images after about 9 hours, during which time it was hard to see that anything was happening, unless I went into the Console app and selected Aperture messages. In the end I left that running overnight; I think it must have had a sleep as it was still running when I woke it in the morning, but happily finished after another couple of hours from there.

If your destination is Capture One Pro, don't forget to turn OFF the option to tag images with keywords representing their albums, otherwise you get keywords separated with a "|" character, which won't import.

It's also worth remembering that ApertureExporter requires Aperture to be running, for it to work. I hope the new information mentioned in the last few posts will give people a bit more time, although I have no information on whether ApertureExporter will run on Catalina.

At the moment I'm tossing up whether to simply use the images exported with adjustments as an import into C1Pro, for the older retro-converted images. That would solve the massive dust problem, as I've mostly done that work in Aperture already. It does mean I won't have access to the original scan files in C1Pro, which might do a better job of editing. Need to do a few more tests, I think!
 
OP
ChrisR

ChrisR

I'm a well known grump...
Messages
9,845
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
Yes
If your destination is Capture One Pro, don't forget to turn OFF the option to tag images with keywords representing their albums, otherwise you get keywords separated with a "|" character, which won't import.
So I'm not sure whether I still had it set up incorrectly, but when I checked the list of keywords in Aperture, I notice there were still a bunch of weird keywords in a hierarchy under "AE". These were obviously adde by ApertureExporter. Happily, it's a one click process to get rid of them! While I was there I went through the whole keyword list, removing a few and correcting some of the obvious typos like "Pntax". Worth doing, I think.

At the moment I'm tossing up whether to simply use the images exported with adjustments as an import into C1Pro, for the older retro-converted images. That would solve the massive dust problem, as I've mostly done that work in Aperture already. It does mean I won't have access to the original scan files in C1Pro, which might do a better job of editing. Need to do a few more tests, I think!
I have now done a full migration from Aperture, using the workflow in the video linked from post #44 above. I decided to use the images in Aperture, with whatever adjustments carried over (but NOT baked in), while keeping my ApertureExporter fully adjusted images in reserve. I'll use them in cases where it would take too much work to re-do an image in C1Pro. The most obvious cases would be some of my 40-year-old, retro-scanned negatives and slides, some of which have had extensive work with the Retouch tool to get rid of dust and scratches. The Retouch adjustments are not carried over in the migration.

I didn't quite do it project by project, as the video recommends, as I have over 1,000 projects. But the projects were divided into around a dozen folders, and I worked fine using a folder at a time. The Fuji folder, for example, had almost 10,000 images in it. I think that folder took 2-3 hours to migrate. Overall it took me about 3 days, off and on. Then there were a bunch of referenced images that didn't migrate because Aperture couldn't locate the files; some of those I was able to find, and then transfer just those projects.

The migration process worked a bit better than it suggested. For example, it says it will migrate crop or straighten adjustments, but in practice it seems to have done both.

One nice thing is that just clicking the "auto-adjust" button in C1Pro has often produced a better image than I had in Aperture.

But... and it's a big BUT... I'm going to have to do a LOT of learning to get up to speed with C1Pro! It took me 2 hours yesterday before I could export an image with 1024 pixels max side, and I still don't quite know how I did it. Obviously things like that will work well quite quickly (I gather I have to build a "recipe" for that... but I couldn't even work out how to specify pixels, it seemed to want to work in inches!). But it's going to take a lot of time to build up the "muscle memory" I had with Aperture.

One of the things that's bugging me a lot at the moment... I used to switch between viewing a single image and a grid of all the images in a project, with a single button click. The only way I've found to do this in C1Pro is to go into the View menu and turn off the Viewer check. Then next time I look at an image, do it again to get back to the grid! I must be missing something...

I bought a book when I started with Aperture, and it was a big help. The C1Pro manual is a bit techy (and possibly a bit Danglish); can anyone recommend a good book on Capture One Pro?
 
Messages
914
Name
Paul
Edit My Images
Yes
So I'm not sure whether I still had it set up incorrectly, but when I checked the list of keywords in Aperture, I notice there were still a bunch of weird keywords in a hierarchy under "AE". These were obviously adde by ApertureExporter. Happily, it's a one click process to get rid of them! While I was there I went through the whole keyword list, removing a few and correcting some of the obvious typos like "Pntax". Worth doing, I think.



I have now done a full migration from Aperture, using the workflow in the video linked from post #44 above. I decided to use the images in Aperture, with whatever adjustments carried over (but NOT baked in), while keeping my ApertureExporter fully adjusted images in reserve. I'll use them in cases where it would take too much work to re-do an image in C1Pro. The most obvious cases would be some of my 40-year-old, retro-scanned negatives and slides, some of which have had extensive work with the Retouch tool to get rid of dust and scratches. The Retouch adjustments are not carried over in the migration.

I didn't quite do it project by project, as the video recommends, as I have over 1,000 projects. But the projects were divided into around a dozen folders, and I worked fine using a folder at a time. The Fuji folder, for example, had almost 10,000 images in it. I think that folder took 2-3 hours to migrate. Overall it took me about 3 days, off and on. Then there were a bunch of referenced images that didn't migrate because Aperture couldn't locate the files; some of those I was able to find, and then transfer just those projects.

The migration process worked a bit better than it suggested. For example, it says it will migrate crop or straighten adjustments, but in practice it seems to have done both.

One nice thing is that just clicking the "auto-adjust" button in C1Pro has often produced a better image than I had in Aperture.

But... and it's a big BUT... I'm going to have to do a LOT of learning to get up to speed with C1Pro! It took me 2 hours yesterday before I could export an image with 1024 pixels max side, and I still don't quite know how I did it. Obviously things like that will work well quite quickly (I gather I have to build a "recipe" for that... but I couldn't even work out how to specify pixels, it seemed to want to work in inches!). But it's going to take a lot of time to build up the "muscle memory" I had with Aperture.

One of the things that's bugging me a lot at the moment... I used to switch between viewing a single image and a grid of all the images in a project, with a single button click. The only way I've found to do this in C1Pro is to go into the View menu and turn off the Viewer check. Then next time I look at an image, do it again to get back to the grid! I must be missing something...

I bought a book when I started with Aperture, and it was a big help. The C1Pro manual is a bit techy (and possibly a bit Danglish); can anyone recommend a good book on Capture One Pro?
When I started using c1 I went on YouTube which was great. Phase One have a load of tutorials posted on there and there are a couple of other guys explaining how to do things. Might be worth a look and if you have two monitors like me just put the tutorial on one screen and C1 on the other and follow along. It is dead easy learning that way.
 
Messages
1,475
Name
Graham
Edit My Images
Yes
But... and it's a big BUT... I'm going to have to do a LOT of learning to get up to speed with C1Pro! It took me 2 hours yesterday before I could export an image with 1024 pixels max side, and I still don't quite know how I did it. Obviously things like that will work well quite quickly (I gather I have to build a "recipe" for that... but I couldn't even work out how to specify pixels, it seemed to want to work in inches!). But it's going to take a lot of time to build up the "muscle memory" I had with Aperture.
One of the things that's bugging me a lot at the moment... I used to switch between viewing a single image and a grid of all the images in a project, with a single button click. The only way I've found to do this in C1Pro is to go into the View menu and turn off the Viewer check. Then next time I look at an image, do it again to get back to the grid! I must be missing something...
The dimensions and resolution settings in the Recipe have a drop down (indicated by a double arrow symbol) that allow you to select pixels or inches. The recipes are very powerful but do need a little time to get them sorted in your head.

The advice given in the Capture One tutorials by David Grover is to set up a hotkey to toggle the viewer to grid view, and he (and I) use the weird double interlinked s at the top left of the keyboard to toggle the grid view.

As well as the dozens of Capture One videos that Phase One provide (essential viewing), this is very useful http://alexonraw.com/capture-one-free-guide-1/

And if you want a book (as far as I know, only two exist) there is https://rawcaptureguide.com/ebook/ which goes through menu items and explains not just what they do, but also how you would use them and there is also this one https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/capture-one-pro-10/.

I have both and find them both useful. The first came out for version 11, and I got a free upgrade to the version 12 version. The second came out as for version 9, and I had to buy the version 10 copy, which hasn't been updated since.

I would probably only buy the first book listed (Photographers guide to Capture One 12), but I full exhaust Alex's free guide first and spend the time watching Phase One's Capture One video tutorials.

I would also give this site a browse https://imagealchemist.net/
 
Top