Beginner Bikes at Chick Sands

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Orangecroc
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Ben
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#3
Do you often go to Chicksands, Ben? I've not been there for 10 years or so, but it used to be fun (to ride).
First time I've been. I don't ride, my best mate rides with a group of friends and I tag along to take pictures. They've only been twice but I can see it being a regular thing because its pretty cool up there.
 
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Ben
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#7
Have a look at https://www.pinkbike.com/photo/podlist/ for some inspiration on how to use your surroundings. Side on on a dirt jump isn't the prettiest, can be a bit messy unless the background is far away, or you go very wide angle up with them.
That link doesn't work.
It was my first time out there, I found it really difficult hitting the focus consistently to begin with, so I ended up using a narrower aperture than I wanted to.
Why don't you like side on shots of jumps? There's way too many trees at Chicksands to avoid them in the background.
 
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Seba
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#8
That link doesn't work.
It was my first time out there, I found it really difficult hitting the focus consistently to begin with, so I ended up using a narrower aperture than I wanted to.
Why don't you like side on shots of jumps? There's way too many trees at Chicksands to avoid them in the background.
Ahh apologise. Link work for me. Pinkbike.com has some great images in their 'pod' section, showing other great angles and approaches you can take with mountain biking.

I think it's important to try and separate the subject from the background a bit to avoid the image becoming too messy. So try to look for an angle which drops the background out a bit more, maybe a bit more head on. I've not done mountain biking in years, and this was only a quick visit the last time I went up to PORC in Kent.

This first one is still a bit messy, but it's kind of what I'm getting at. Another option, and it's something used in skating and blading images is putting the subject in the clear sky, again to isolate it a bit more. Second image shows this. (can't seem to upload the second image for some reason - too large apparently) Appreciate that's quite hard at somewhere like Chicksands with the tall trees but just gives and idea of other approaches. In fact a 'pod' on PinkBike from only a couple of days ago does this in tall tress. https://www.pinkbike.com/photo/15859070/


SD1_5436_zps013e52ab.JPG
 
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Orangecroc
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#9
Ahh apologise. Link work for me. Pinkbike.com has some great images in their 'pod' section, showing other great angles and approaches you can take with mountain biking.

I think it's important to try and separate the subject from the background a bit to avoid the image becoming too messy. So try to look for an angle which drops the background out a bit more, maybe a bit more head on. I've not done mountain biking in years, and this was only a quick visit the last time I went up to PORC in Kent.

This first one is still a bit messy, but it's kind of what I'm getting at. Another option, and it's something used in skating and blading images is putting the subject in the clear sky, again to isolate it a bit more. Second image shows this. (can't seem to upload the second image for some reason - too large apparently) Appreciate that's quite hard at somewhere like Chicksands with the tall trees but just gives and idea of other approaches. In fact a 'pod' on PinkBike from only a couple of days ago does this in tall tress. https://www.pinkbike.com/photo/15859070/


View attachment 126153
I will have another look on the galleries in pink bike.
I will try wider apertures next time, and have a play with longer focal lengths too. It's definitely difficult to get clear sky at Chicksands.
 
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#12
I will have another look on the galleries in pink bike.
I will try wider apertures next time, and have a play with longer focal lengths too. It's definitely difficult to get clear sky at Chicksands.
Yeah, appreciate that regarding the skies. Try all sorts of (safe!) angles, make mistakes, and then try some more!

Makes me want to get back out there and buy another mountain bike!
 
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KIPAX
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#14
What does that even mean?

He means they need popping.. and that is an editing term.. the composition is great on them all bar the first one (chopped off feet & too much headroom) you got faces in which so many of these pictures don't manage... so great in that rspect .... but the presentation is dull.. they need some editing...
 
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#15
He means they need popping.. and that is an editing term.. the composition is great on them all bar the first one (chopped off feet & too much headroom) you got faces in which so many of these pictures don't manage... so great in that rspect .... but the presentation is dull.. they need some editing...
Any suggestions to help me achieve it because I have no idea.
 
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Dave
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#16
Ben, a great start but may i make a few suggestions? Now i don't shoot dirt jumps but i cover DH racing and various events so am always pointing towards a jump of some sort.

The composition is key here and i try to go either with a long lens shooting towards the jump and try and get some aspect of where they are heading to with a bit more foreground. The riders love these as they can see how high and sideways they are. Otherwise i shoot wide and use a fisheye a lot and get some funky angles.

The ones you have posted are all a bit in between the 2 so don't really work that well with the riders sort of lost in the frame.

These are a few of mine to show what i mean.


Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

I hope this gives you some more ideas but any more questions feel free to ask.
 
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Orangecroc
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#17
Ben, a great start but may i make a few suggestions? Now i don't shoot dirt jumps but i cover DH racing and various events so am always pointing towards a jump of some sort.

The composition is key here and i try to go either with a long lens shooting towards the jump and try and get some aspect of where they are heading to with a bit more foreground. The riders love these as they can see how high and sideways they are. Otherwise i shoot wide and use a fisheye a lot and get some funky angles.

The ones you have posted are all a bit in between the 2 so don't really work that well with the riders sort of lost in the frame.

These are a few of mine to show what i mean.


Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

Jump samples
by nessiemac1, on Flickr

I hope this gives you some more ideas but any more questions feel free to ask.
That is great help. Gives me something to aim for when I get out with them next.
 
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