Canon PIXMA PRO Printers

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Steve
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#1
I'm looking for an reasonably priced A3 printer and the Pixma Pro range seem popular.

Could anybody summarise the differences between the 10S & 100S? And if anybody has one, how do you get on with it?
 
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Rich
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#2
Hello again Steve


I have the 10, its basically the same as the 10S, think the newer version has improved wifi/cloud capabilities.
For a start the 10S is pigment rather than the 100S ink if that makes any difference to you.
As far as printing goes its excellent and no more thirsty than any other printer I've owned
Full set of ten cartridges (I have only used genuine ones) comes in at around the £100 mark
Easy to set up via a router and establish a connection, my printer is upstairs and the PC downstairs, no issues with that.
Its a large heavy machine and has a big footprint, need to allow a fair bit of space at the back for the paper feeder.

That's about it for the 10, sure someone will be along soon to speak about the 100
 
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#3
Steve
I love my 100s which uses dye inks which have improved considerably in terms of archival life but still not as long as the 10 using pigment inks. My printed images will I believe long outlive me. I love this printer and I've stuck with genuine Canon inks having been burnt using CIS on two previous Epsons. One thing about the Canon I much appreciate is should I have to I can pop a new head in for about £100 quid and no need to switch normal black and photo blacks which I had before. The wifi and cloud printing from wherever you are is a bonus too.
Jamie
 
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#4
I have owned a vanilla Pro100 for quite a number of years. I too only use genuine inks - shop around each time as prices vary. Very reliable. The cleaning cycle takes a while each time I use it (I can go weeks without printing) but I've never experienced blocked nozzles. It's a heavy old beast, though. My only regret is that it cannot do roll or panorama prints.
 
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Jelster
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#5
Thanks for the replies.

Once we move I'll have a better idea about space etc so I will know where it can live. I'm considering converting the garage to a studio, so maybe that will be the best place.
 
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#7
Well I have had a Pro100 for a number of years and cannot complain about it. Always reliable, as has been said it is a very heavy beast.

I have always used compatible inks after the first lot ran out, never had a problem with them.
 
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#8
There is a YouTube channel which is worth checking out https://www.youtube.com/user/cheo1949
He has playlists dedicated to each of those printers plus I think some that compare the results.

If you are thinking of selling your work, then original manufacturer pigment inks are probably best used (Pro 10s) due to their supposed superior longevity.
 
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Mark
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#9
I have a Canon Pixma IP8750, because I couldn't afford any of the Pro range, and I think it's bloody brilliant! Of course I've never had anything else to compare it to, but using Canon inks on Canon glossy paper my A3 prints are as good as I could imagine ever wanting them to be!
 
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#10
One other thing which is annoying - with fine art printing it imposes a 30mm border. I believe this can be circumvented.
Yes it can! You can set up custom paper sizes, I have even printed on A2 cut down to A3+ width (2:1 aspect ratio image) on a Pro-100

I'm looking for an reasonably priced A3 printer and the Pixma Pro range seem popular.

Could anybody summarise the differences between the 10S & 100S? And if anybody has one, how do you get on with it?
Having upgraded from a Pro-100 to Pro-1000, I would say if you can afford it and have the table space, its worth the upgrade. It is a next level up in print quality. It does actually require less depth on fine art papers than a 10/100 as the papers can be fed in from the top.

I used inks from OctoInkJet in my Pro-100 and found them to be very good.

There is a YouTube channel which is worth checking out https://www.youtube.com/user/cheo1949
He has playlists dedicated to each of those printers plus I think some that compare the results.

If you are thinking of selling your work, then original manufacturer pigment inks are probably best used (Pro 10s) due to their supposed superior longevity.
This is a great channel and very helpful with all things printing, I've subscribed for some time.
 
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#13
I have a Canon Pixma IP8750, because I couldn't afford any of the Pro range, and I think it's bloody brilliant! Of course I've never had anything else to compare it to, but using Canon inks on Canon glossy paper my A3 prints are as good as I could imagine ever wanting them to be!
Same here - though my first one did suddenly develop a fatal error, which is either a failed print head or a failed main board - but after checking costs to repair, I noticed Canon were offering a £35 cashback on a new printer - and with Amazon selling them for £168 at the time meant that a brand new printer was cheaper than repairing the old one if it was the main board that had failed! (and that's before figuring the cost of sending the old printer to the repair company).

I'm not selling prints, so they are only for display at home, or for friends and relatives, and I've only ever had positive comments on the quality.
 
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#14
Out of interest, what is the footprint of the 10 & 100 printers?
Just had a quick rough measure with the rear paper flap up (which it needs to be) and the front collection plate open
Its approximately 18ins high and extreme front to back 30ins, that is the total overall size
The clearance needed outside of the printer base dimensions are approximately 5ins rear and 8ins front
My 10 sits on a chest of drawers which have to be pulled forward slightly to get the rear flap completely open
 
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Jelster
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#15
Just had a quick rough measure with the rear paper flap up (which it needs to be) and the front collection plate open
Its approximately 18ins high and extreme front to back 30ins, that is the total overall size
The clearance needed outside of the printer base dimensions are approximately 5ins rear and 8ins front
My 10 sits on a chest of drawers which have to be pulled forward slightly to get the rear flap completely open

Cheers Rich, I have a large'ish wooden filing cabinet I was hoping to use, but I think that may fall a bit short 28.5 x 16 inches....

May have to think about a new office setup when we move...
 
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Andrew
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#16
Out of interest, what is the footprint of the 10 & 100 printers?
I reckon you need at least a metre of depth to deal with the top-rear feed and the front tray being extended for the 10 when it's in use. The 100 looks about the same size.

It needs to be placed on a reasonably solid table or trolley as the head movements will make it try and move quite a bit when operating.
 
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#17
Just had a quick rough measure with the rear paper flap up (which it needs to be) and the front collection plate open
Its approximately 18ins high and extreme front to back 30ins, that is the total overall size
The clearance needed outside of the printer base dimensions are approximately 5ins rear and 8ins front
My 10 sits on a chest of drawers which have to be pulled forward slightly to get the rear flap completely open
Cheers Rich, I have a large'ish wooden filing cabinet I was hoping to use, but I think that may fall a bit short 28.5 x 16 inches....

May have to think about a new office setup when we move...
You need more than 5 inches rear to feed in A3/A3+ paper on the manual feed
 
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#18
You need more than 5 inches rear to feed in A3/A3+ paper on the manual feed
I find the paper can be fed quite upright and with it being flexible I don't need much more clearance at the rear
Very unusual to not have adequate space for the front tray unless the printer is operated in a box or similar
 
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#19
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