CLASSIC and important CARS - open thread:

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#41
The 1905 V8 25.4 Litre Darracq which held the land speed record of 109.5 mph
Hi, a rocket car, from 1928 reached 238km/h on a racetrack. It's an OPEL (Vauxhall affiliate, now all Peugeot). No details on the range of the 24 rockets, but should be like today's electric cars:


L1013209_DxO-f-L50cron-c_bearbeitet-1.jpg


L1013215_DxO-f-L50cron-2_bearbeitet-1.jpg
 
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#42
Nice - why leave it on 6v and not convert - originality?
1: Because of the expense of changing all the bulbs, relays, battery and motors etc (I know its not a fortune in the grand scheme of things but I would have to pay someone to do it as i'm technically challenged)
2: The guy who did the majority of the restoration wanted it that way so I feel obliged to keep it as he wanted.
3: Its a conversation starter. :)
 
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#43
One could even change a tire by lifting a wheel hydraulically. (I have seen it done.) The decline of Citroen is due to quality problems. Few garages could fix the hydraulics in Germany (and in England, too). Ducellier electrics were unreliable, and there was rust ... ---
My neighbour had a CX25 and we replaced all the hydraulic pipes, making them ourselves because of cost. There was miles of tubing on that car
 
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#44
My neighbour had a CX25 and we replaced all the hydraulic pipes, making them ourselves because of cost. There was miles of tubing on that car
Hi, French cars had some poor quality parts. A former colleague had a Peugeot. The brakelines had fissures and needed replacement. I had never heard of breakline fissures before ... ---

After my 2CV I never had a French car again!

Anyway, a picture of the car you mentioned. - I think it is worth preserving:


L1013078_DxO-L50c-tp.jpg
 
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#46
Took up the whole driveway :D
Notice the cardboard to catch the oil leaks
Hi, cardboards have to be used now with all cars at public meetings in Germany against incontinence ... ---

The Trabant, aka "Trabi" was important for the East Germans. They had to wait years for delivery. Some called it "the racing cardboard" :

D80_7890-n70-200c_bearbeitet-1.jpg
 
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#52
Hi, a never-wozzer, as they say in John le Carree's A Perfect Spy, i.e. one of my dream cars for years.

(The main problem for me: This would be my car, if I could have only one. And then you have the windnoise at more than 70 mph, meaning you will always have to watch your back on the Autobahn ... )


D80_3673-n70c-tp.jpg
 
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#53
Hi, a stepping stone between scooter/motorcycle and a real car were the Kabinenroller, i.e. "cabin-scooter". - Today it is difficult to imagine that simply travelling clean and dry was a major step forward ...

MESSERSCHMITT Tiger, a competitive, sporty vehicle (in the 50s):


DSC02269-a7r2-s55c_bearbeitet-1.jpg
 
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#60
Hi, most participants at the last rallye knew me:


D80_4115-n70c-tp.jpg


Those who didn't ...


D80_4127-n70c-tp.jpg


... pulled a speed-trap-face:


D80_4127-n70cc-tp.jpg
 
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#62
Could run on flat tyres, as evidenced when terrorists tried to assassinate Charles de Gaulle. 2-4 of the car's tyres were shot out but it managed to escape. IIRC it had a brake button rather than a proper pedal. Gorgeous car.
I had a GS which also had hydropneumatic* suspension. Brake pedal was indeed a "button" on the floor, it opened a valve from the suspension fluid into the brake lines if memory serves correctly, the rear brakes operated directly off the suspension fluid, so the heavier you loaded the car the more pressure was applied on application to the rear brakes. A clever idea, however the suspension fluid was very heavily pressurised so if you got a leak the fluid was gone in an instant. Early models used fish oil that absolutely stank if you got it on your hands, later models used conventional hydraulic fluid. Front brakes on the GS were inboard in as much that they were on the drive shafts very close to the engine and were accessed via the cabin rather than taking off the wheel(s). My GS did run on 3 wheels, but it had to be a rear wheel as there was no limited slip diff, so loss of a front wheel would result in loss of drive to the other wheel.
* actually I suppose it was oliopneuamatic really.
 
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#64
No details on the range of the 24 rockets, but should be like today's electric cars:
I reckon even Mrs Nod's Leaf will go further on a charge than the rocket car will on one set of tubes! Not as quickly though, I'll admit...

I wonder if that's an ex-military one. The doubled front bumper hints that it might be but lots of people here fit them to civilian ones.


Hi, the Renault was an early hatchback (the first was the Simca 1301, I think):


View attachment 133867
Dad had 2 or 3 R16s. I think the Citroen Traction Avant/Light 15 was the first hatchback (as we know them).

Hi, I am not sure whether a three-wheeler counts as a car, but this MORGAN (with JAP-engine(!)) is a classic anyhow:


View attachment 133936

Slightly odd motor in that Mog - they usually had the exhausts at each side rather than both to the left like that one has. Half tempted by one of the new ones but don't fit comfortably and need a slight hint of practicality at least!

View attachment 133937
Hi, a Bentley Derby Mulliner DHC 4 1/2 from 1936:


View attachment 134296
4 1/2 or 4 1/4? By '36, Rolls Royce had taken over and new engines were made.
 
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#66
1.)I reckon even Mrs Nod's Leaf will go further on a charge than the rocket car will on one set of tubes! Not as quickly though, I'll admit...

2.)I wonder if that's an ex-military one. The doubled front bumper hints that it might be but lots of people here fit them to civilian ones.

3.)Dad had 2 or 3 R16s. I think the Citroen Traction Avant/Light 15 was the first hatchback (as we know them).

4.)4 1/2 or 4 1/4? By '36, Rolls Royce had taken over and new engines were made.
Hi,

ad1) I am very much old school ... :sorry:

a2) Could be. The British Army in Germany had auctions, and maybe this one is ex-military, or the bumpers "migrated".

ad3) Here I am not sure. A proper hatchback should have its back door hinged at the roof, and the door should be somewhat slanted, otherwise it would be an estate. So, the Simca 1301 is a candidate, and the R16.
(The R4 is too estate-like, I think.)

ad4) I simply took the info from the event brochure, which could be wrong ... ---

Morgan)"Slightly odd motor in that Mog - they usually had the exhausts at each side rather than both to the left like that one has. Half tempted by one of the new ones but don't fit comfortably and need a slight hint of practicality at least!"

Sorry, I overlooked this one. This Morgan has seen many rebuild-efforts, I suppose. Maybe the German MOT exerted its influence. As I said, the JAP engine is extremely rare.

Thank you for your detailed comments! Good for me - and the thread! :)
 
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#67
I had a GS which also had hydropneumatic* suspension. Brake pedal was indeed a "button" on the floor, it opened a valve from the suspension fluid into the brake lines if memory serves correctly, the rear brakes operated directly off the suspension fluid, so the heavier you loaded the car the more pressure was applied on application to the rear brakes. A clever idea, however the suspension fluid was very heavily pressurised so if you got a leak the fluid was gone in an instant. Early models used fish oil that absolutely stank if you got it on your hands, later models used conventional hydraulic fluid. Front brakes on the GS were inboard in as much that they were on the drive shafts very close to the engine and were accessed via the cabin rather than taking off the wheel(s). My GS did run on 3 wheels, but it had to be a rear wheel as there was no limited slip diff, so loss of a front wheel would result in loss of drive to the other wheel.
* actually I suppose it was oliopneuamatic really.
Hi, thank you for sharing your experiences. :) The decline of Citroen is a rather sad story. So, it is not only a brilliant concept that matters, but also manufacturing quality and dealership support. ---

A Skoda Popular Sport Monte Carlo Roadster from 1936:


D80_0065-n70c_bearbeitet-1.jpg
 
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#69
Hi, coming back to the Alpine. The youtube review in Harry's Garage is most interesting. The Alpine is a serious sports car effort, going maximally lightweight, making it very competitive. (Didn't know this ... ---):


DSC00663-a7r2-s35c-tp.jpg
 
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#70
Hi, an S-class estate, built in Japan for an artist, who kept it for years standing in her gallery. The engine needs rebuilding now. Sticky piston rings etc. ... :


DSC00674-a7r2-s55c-tp.jpg
 
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#72
Hi, a classic Caddy:


DSC00627-a7r2-s55c.jpg

I found flying goddess as a name for the hood ornament, but no first name:


DSC00620-a7r2-s55c.jpg


A more mature and wordly flying goddess from the 60s:


L1012826_DxO-L50summ-c-tp.jpg
 
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