Durdle Door Milky Way

Asha

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Asha
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Wow that is impressive.:clap:

Although I've never followed astronomy, I have always been intrigued by stars.

Sometimes I'll lie outside looking up at the night sky ( I'm very lucky that where i live there is limited light pollution)

Sometimes it becomes quite frightening, well, perhaps unnerving is a better word, as initially i see the stars that are (presumably) the closest to earth but then I found myself "drifting" deeper and seeing more and more of them and it feels like I'm very slowly but surely going deeper into space.:runaway::LOL:
The feeling is, for me, very real as it actually takes quite an effort of concentration to "pull myself back to earth" if that makes sense.

I have no idea if it is simply an effect that I experience or if it is " the norm".
 

TheBigYin

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Mark
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I have no idea if it is simply an effect that I experience or if it is " the norm".
i've definitely felt the same kind of thing - usually back when I'd had a "wild camp" somewhere on/near the top of a mountain in summer, miles from anywhere and just lying in a Bivi Bag drifting around the universe. Often I'd only end up falling asleep at or near sunrise as the stars faded and my interest waned again. Thinking about it, It's quite strange I never ended up getting into telescopes and all that sort of thing, as I was always a bit of a "space cadet" but sadly realised that looking was the only way i'd explore these places...
 
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Wow that is impressive.:clap:

Although I've never followed astronomy, I have always been intrigued by stars.

Sometimes I'll lie outside looking up at the night sky ( I'm very lucky that where i live there is limited light pollution)

Sometimes it becomes quite frightening, well, perhaps unnerving is a better word, as initially i see the stars that are (presumably) the closest to earth but then I found myself "drifting" deeper and seeing more and more of them and it feels like I'm very slowly but surely going deeper into space.:runaway::LOL:
The feeling is, for me, very real as it actually takes quite an effort of concentration to "pull myself back to earth" if that makes sense.

I have no idea if it is simply an effect that I experience or if it is " the norm".
i've definitely felt the same kind of thing - usually back when I'd had a "wild camp" somewhere on/near the top of a mountain in summer, miles from anywhere and just lying in a Bivi Bag drifting around the universe. Often I'd only end up falling asleep at or near sunrise as the stars faded and my interest waned again. Thinking about it, It's quite strange I never ended up getting into telescopes and all that sort of thing, as I was always a bit of a "space cadet" but sadly realised that looking was the only way i'd explore these places...
Yes, for me also staring at the sky on a clean night, looking at the stars, it's a very calming and rewarding experience, I find myself forgetting about everything else and completely disconnected from the real world.
Thanks.
 
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Tom
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Beautiful. Is that the moon rising in the distance?

I've just started playing around with nightscapes - fortunately I live on the edge of Dartmoor so I have dark skies on my doorstep.

I have a question about getting the exposure of the foreground right. I understand that with foreground objects near the the camera you can 'light paint' with a torch, but with landscapes like yours that's surely not possible (unless you have a big torch). Do you just do a separate very long exposure for the foreground? (I say 'foreground, distant cliffs would never be considered foreground in normal landscape photography, but compared to the rest of the universe...!).

What kind of exposure time/ISO do you use for the land? I'm using around f/2.8 20" IS)1600 and getting good results with stars. Do you stop down the aperture/ISO and just do one super long exposure?? Sorry for all the questions o_O
 
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Beautiful. Is that the moon rising in the distance?

I've just started playing around with nightscapes - fortunately I live on the edge of Dartmoor so I have dark skies on my doorstep.

I have a question about getting the exposure of the foreground right. I understand that with foreground objects near the the camera you can 'light paint' with a torch, but with landscapes like yours that's surely not possible (unless you have a big torch). Do you just do a separate very long exposure for the foreground? (I say 'foreground, distant cliffs would never be considered foreground in normal landscape photography, but compared to the rest of the universe...!).

What kind of exposure time/ISO do you use for the land? I'm using around f/2.8 20" IS)1600 and getting good results with stars. Do you stop down the aperture/ISO and just do one super long exposure?? Sorry for all the questions o_O
Thank you very much @Tom Pinchenzo .
I have only done light painting once and with not great results so it's something I do not do....I need to get more practice on that.
Yes, many people blend an exposure for the foreground and one, various if stacked, for the sky.
My photo is not one of those, it's a panorama of 5 vertical shots at f2.8, ISO 5000 20 seconds. With those settings I got enough detail in the foreground/land to be able to bring the land up in post.
 
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Thank you very much @Tom Pinchenzo .
I have only done light painting once and with not great results so it's something I do not do....I need to get more practice on that.
Yes, many people blend an exposure for the foreground and one, various if stacked, for the sky.
My photo is not one of those, it's a panorama of 5 vertical shots at f2.8, ISO 5000 20 seconds. With those settings I got enough detail in the foreground/land to be able to bring the land up in post.
That sounds easier than faffing around with stacking and blending...! I guess the extra res from the pano means you get less visible noise. Like how using larger format film reduces grain.

I’ve been watching vids from this guy who has some great tutorials on light painting. He takes several images which he’s lit from different angles. It’s very clever how he does it.
 
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That sounds easier than faffing around with stacking and blending...! I guess the extra res from the pano means you get less visible noise. Like how using larger format film reduces grain.

I’ve been watching vids from this guy who has some great tutorials on light painting. He takes several images which he’s lit from different angles. It’s very clever how he does it.
Exactly, properly blending so it looks natural it's tricky and takes time.
 
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Si
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Absolutely stunning! I've been wanting to get out to try and get something of the Milky Way for some time (mostly likely another year with the way things stand), albeit I doubt very much I'd get anywhere near this standard without a lot of time, patience and practice, so well done...
 
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Absolutely stunning! I've been wanting to get out to try and get something of the Milky Way for some time (mostly likely another year with the way things stand), albeit I doubt very much I'd get anywhere near this standard without a lot of time, patience and practice, so well done...
Thank you very much.
Yes, give it a go, it's all about practice....and lots of patience here in the UK with the weather.


Superb, nothing more to say..
Thanks a lot.
 
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Joey
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Itching to get out again chasing the Milky Way.

Durdle Door Milky Way by gintoxic76, on Flickr
I absolutely love shooting the Milky Way! It is so beautiful. The only thing that keeps me from doing it... is im near a big city, and i cannot really get to a place that has a dark sky. The last time that i shot the Milky Way i was in the northern part of my state. But this is absolutely beautiful.
 
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Michael
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Awesome
 
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I absolutely love shooting the Milky Way! It is so beautiful. The only thing that keeps me from doing it... is im near a big city, and i cannot really get to a place that has a dark sky. The last time that i shot the Milky Way i was in the northern part of my state. But this is absolutely beautiful.
Yes, light pollution is a pain. I'm lucky I live in the South East and we have Beachy Head which is not too bad.
 

RWDW

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Robert
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This is just incredible! Absolutely love it - great photograph!
 
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Rick
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Wow, amazing shot. I tried to capture this years ago on old DSLR equipment, but came out nowhere near as good as this. You're very skilled and that Sony is amazing!
 
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Geoff Blackmore
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Love the shot do you use a astromount for the sky. Or do you just shoot a relatively short exposure unlike our Astro photo friends with Telescopes
 
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