Framing metallic / glossy prints - without glass?

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13,884
Name
Nightmare
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#1
I am clueless what to do with nice super glossy metallic prints. I have one nice print which I'd like to frame for myself and quite likely offer this to paying customers in the future.

Would you go without glass as that avoids double reflections? How do you protect the print in that case, if at all? Specifically let's consider Olmec paper in this example.

Then what about normal glossy?

Baryta / gloss probably would be already happy behind quality glass and so would definitely pear, satin and photorag papers. But then what about those textured aquarelles?

These days just about every picture is framed under glass, but if you walk into an art museum that is no longer the case. There is hardly any glass there. Maybe it doesn't need to be there, just then you have to protect it and the materials here are quite different.

---

P.S. What glue would you recommend for mounting the print on the board?

Thanks.
 
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6,821
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#2
Museum Glass does exist and I have seen it in a framers compared to normal float glass and as you describe you would think there is nothing there!

I think the guy told me it was very expensive.......>£100 per sheet (thinks ??? Sheet might have been 3x4 feet?)

One version he had was called Art Glass.

As for mounting, are you talking about a metalic paper? If so, I surmise best to mount it like any other quality paper ~ T-hinged so that it can "breathe'.

HTH :)

Edit
Tru Vue glass
One multi branch framing service might have a branch near you to get bespoke cut size & collect. https://www.wessexpictures.com/tru_vue_glass.html
 
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Name
Danny
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#5
Think your main choice here is compromise.

You have a highly glossy print on paper, so you should protect it from the elements with glass, this would lead to recommending a product like the TruVue anti-reflective glass mentioned above and we do use this a lot for our customers too. The downside is, the print is highly reflective to start with so either way it may be difficult to view.

Another option would be to print direct to metal to avoid the need for glass and possible framing too, costs could be quite similar here when all framing costs are taken into consideration.

This is why the preferred look for my work is a matt print behind the TruVue glass, purely to get rid of reflections, also means you can sign the print in pencil if that's your thing.
 
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LongLensPhotography
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13,884
Name
Nightmare
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#6
Think your main choice here is compromise.

You have a highly glossy print on paper, so you should protect it from the elements with glass, this would lead to recommending a product like the TruVue anti-reflective glass mentioned above and we do use this a lot for our customers too. The downside is, the print is highly reflective to start with so either way it may be difficult to view.

Another option would be to print direct to metal to avoid the need for glass and possible framing too, costs could be quite similar here when all framing costs are taken into consideration.

This is why the preferred look for my work is a matt print behind the TruVue glass, purely to get rid of reflections, also means you can sign the print in pencil if that's your thing.
It is great to hear that this glass works with metallic prints.

It is not so much the question about using "metallic" paper vs matte or direct metal prints; of course this will be a very specialised option. It was more a question about what to do when you have to make such print, or why such papers even exist...
 
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