Tutorial Guide to Panning in Motorsports

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#1
Apex Photography submitted a new resource:

Guide to Panning - The guide is based on motorsport but the same tips apply for panning of any moving subject

The guide is based on motorsport but the same tips apply for panning of any moving subject. It starts off with an introduction to panning and instructions on how to get started. It also includes techniques on how to get more of your pans in focus.
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Sue
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#2
Great article! Can I add that you need to take the surface into account when panning as well? With tarmac you can go much slower than off-road. I do a lot of motorcycle grasstrack photography and with the very rough surface rarely bother to go below 1/125 as the hit rate become tiny as the bikes bounce up and down.

(Apologies for the logo, this is the only copy on my iPad).

IMG_1601.JPG
 
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OP
Apex Photography
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#3
Great article! Can I add that you need to take the surface into account when panning as well? With tarmac you can go much slower than off-road. I do a lot of motorcycle grasstrack photography and with the very rough surface rarely bother to go below 1/125 as the hit rate become tiny as the bikes bounce up and down.

(Apologies for the logo, this is the only copy on my iPad).

View attachment 146561
Thanks, I'm glad you like the article :) Good point, I'll add that in. I've mostly done photography on tarmac, so didn't think about offroad.
 
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Rob Telford
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#4
Good advice there about tracking a particular spot on the vehicle such as the driver's helmet or a sponsor logo.

I take quite a lot of photographs of buses on the move and it becomes critical when you have such a large object moving in the frame, often with a wider lens than I suspect you are using.

You are never going to get the entirety of the vehicle sharp as parallax movement occurs around the node you are following, so you have to be careful to choose the spot well - not always so simple with a 28mm or 50mm at fairly close quarters.

I don't make things easier for myself by using manual focus lenses, either, but it does put paid to the myth that they are only good for static subjects :)

28mm@1/50th, 50mm@1/30th and 50mm@1/15th sec respectively


London United LT137
by Rob Telford, on Flickr


Stagecoach LT379
by Rob Telford, on Flickr


Arriva London LT496
by Rob Telford, on Flickr
 
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