Critique My daughter-again

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712
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Clint
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The first photo has too much space on the right( for my tastes), the second just seems like a“normal” photo but I do find the last one interesting as it gets me thinking about what might be happening, a little bit of mystery. Of course I am looking at these as an outsider where as you have a personal connection.
 
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jpgreenwood
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jason
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Thanks. I was trying for a nice, warm, autumn look. Too much space on the first? Ok, again, I was looking at rule of thirds. Comments noted guys. I’m still learning so I’ll take on board. It will help me improve. Cheers.
 
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Mark
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Great attempt just some general comments.

I would have stood up (not kneeled down?) to raise the viewpoint in pic #1
The coat works well in pic #2 but isn’t flattering in pic #1.
The pose in pic #2 is more relaxed and my fave shot.
As the lights a little flat, pics #1 and #2 would benefit from a pop of off camera flash to add some light to the face.
3 of 4 shots are relying on a phone, which for me makes it harder to connect for the viewer as the subjects attention is elsewhere.
 
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jpgreenwood
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jason
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Thanks. I was trying to portray what teenagers generally look like these days. Always on their phones. Unfortunately I’ve lost my plate for my big tripod so I couldn’t get any higher. The path drops down as it exits the bridge. I had an on camera flash but it failed on me and I had the intention of taking a floodlight but forgot. Always a learning day.
 
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Hugh
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I'm a really big fan of negative space in a portrait. Number 1 uses it really well. Both #1 & b #2 seem over saturated to me. I'm not sure I'd have toned it down as far as the example above but I'd certainly reduce it a little.

#4 is very compelling and works well for me
 

EJB

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Ted
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I love No 4 I think the the very reserved lighting is brilliant. :)
 
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Scott
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Great pictures, i'm still very much a beginner so my comments probably are not valid. I did like pic 3 but i would have used the 1/3rds rule and left a big open space behind her, a bit like this.
Forum pic.jpg

If anyone thinks i'm wrong please say so, and then it helps me and the OP learn.
 
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#1 oversaturated, negative space (for me) doesn't work... maybe because she is facing outwards, and the eye is drawn that way, but the space is behind her...
#2 oversaturated, but more natural (as already posted)
#3 Like the focus, draws the eye. If you were to try a 1/3 crop, go negative to the right hand side (try it and see) as Scotts edit above feels like #1 (however that could be good in a set?)
#4 focus on her is good. Not liking the tree/bush to the rhs (as above - feels like there should be something there.

My opinions, take with a pinch of salt. Main part is you got the focus nice, rest is building up different angles/views (where physically possible)

Keep at it!
 
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21,261
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Les
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Great pictures, i'm still very much a beginner so my comments probably are not valid. I did like pic 3 but i would have used the 1/3rds rule and left a big open space behind her, a bit like this.
View attachment 295760

If anyone thinks i'm wrong please say so, and then it helps me and the OP learn.

where as I prefer this crop :) + a little more light on the subject

 
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jpgreenwood
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jason
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Can I just ask the forum, negative space, should that be ahead of the subjects line of sight as a general rule?
 
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Clint
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Generally speaking, subjects should be looking into the space, cars travelling towards the space etc. It’s not a rule set in stone as there are times when you might want to deviate from that.
 
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jpgreenwood
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jason
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Is this a better composition and edit? Should she subject be looking directly at the camera, slightly away from, or in another direction completely?
_JAY2965-Edit-2 by jason greenwood, on Flickr
 
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jpgreenwood
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jason
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Yes I’m not sure how to get the skin right and keep the rest of the scene looking natural.
 
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Toni
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I'd concentrate on the face first, then if there are other setions of the image that look a little odd you could brush them with settings to correct what's wrong.
 
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Ian
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I did like pic 3 but i would have used the 1/3rds rule and left a big open space behind her, a bit like this.
Space left behind a subject (or opposite to their facing) can create a sense of unease - which is why many photographers suggest not doing it. Think of those movie scenes where something is about to jump out or creep up on the actor. Almost always you'll have space behind the subject. Your edit & Les' edit right below it create two very different scenes. Neither is right/wrong.
 
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Scott
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Space left behind a subject (or opposite to their facing) can create a sense of unease - which is why many photographers suggest not doing it. Think of those movie scenes where something is about to jump out or creep up on the actor. Almost always you'll have space behind the subject. Your edit & Les' edit right below it create two very different scenes. Neither is right/wrong.
I probably watch to many films where that happens, i think the unease creates more of a story, is there something there? Whats about to happen? Type of thing, but of course if you are taking pictures of your daughter in the woods giving the impression something is going to jump out behind her probably isnt right for a nice family picture.
 
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jpgreenwood
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jason
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I think it must have been poor natural lighting. I was in a wooded area, with lots of shade, around sunset. I find it difficult to get what I know is her natural skin tone. They all either look too over saturated, too pasty, or too purple.
 
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16,652
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Toni
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I think it must have been poor natural lighting. I was in a wooded area, with lots of shade, around sunset. I find it difficult to get what I know is her natural skin tone. They all either look too over saturated, too pasty, or too purple.
I used the whites of her eyes as a neutral tone with the eye dropper colour selection in LR, then tweaked from that : easier than just hitting the sliders.
 
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21,261
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Les
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I think it must have been poor natural lighting. I was in a wooded area, with lots of shade, around sunset. I find it difficult to get what I know is her natural skin tone. They all either look too over saturated, too pasty, or too purple.

Then maybe use a fill flash ( off camera is a good starting place )

Here's one I did last year - you can clearly see the Flash catchlight in her eyes- taken outside too




Les :)
 
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16,652
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Toni
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I'm pretty sure there was fill flash on the one I edited - visible in the railings on the left as sharp shadows and highlights.
 
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jpgreenwood
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jason
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I had an on camera flash but it failed on me somewhere through the shoot, hence I started to use the phone to light up her face.
 
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Hugh
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Can I just ask the forum, negative space, should that be ahead of the subjects line of sight as a general rule?

Its a very subjective thing. Personally I love negative space and there's no such rule about the subject looking into the frame. Its not negative space if they're looking into it. Others opinions may vary about its use
 
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