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  1. Jannyfox

    Jannyfox

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    I go to the Algarve for two reasons only - to do astrophotography using kit I don't have at home, and to image deep sky objects I can't easily see from home. This year I went towards the end of August and came back with subs for 16 images, plus sun spots, plus the partial solar eclipse that we were able to see from there. Processing is going to be slow as I'm very much a beginner at the software I'm using and it's not exactly easy to learn.
    I will add images as they're ready but just a taster for now
    This is M8, an emission nebula known as the Lagoon. 60 subs in all - all the details on Flickr. I haven't imaged this since my days of 35mm, when I probably spent about 40 mins lying under the scope manually guiding it. How times have changed. I couldn't physically do that now, but the computer stuff that's taken over is just as hard in a different way.

    [​IMG]M8 - the Lagoon Nebula by Jannyfox, on Flickr
     
  2. alan72

    alan72

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    Very impressive, I imagine this is just a tiny dot in the sky to look at.
     
  3. Jannyfox

    Jannyfox

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    In even a small telescope it's lovely although visually you only see the brightest bits in the image. It's pretty big. The image is the full frame from a 200mm telescope, which is fairly small and so quite low magnification, albeit with a crop sensor. Sadly Sagittarius only ever gets very low from the UK as the area has some of the best deep sky objects in the northern sky, but on a dark enough night it's worth a look around with binoculars. It's in the Milky Way, too, hence the field full of stars.
     
  4. alan72

    alan72

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    I'm not based in the UK these days (see my other posts), and where I am we are blessed with very dark sky locations relatively close by. I've been taken by the night sky photography bug this summer, maybe need to explore some of the more specific objects of the sky whilst I have this opportunity.
     
  5. Jannyfox

    Jannyfox

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    I had to look that one up - Azerbaijan, yes? If you can get access to a telescope, even a fairly small one, you'll be blown away by what's out there. If you have a long lens and a tracking mount of some sort then the larger, brighter deep sky objects are within your reach without a scope. I use a 600mm on a crop sensor at home as my little scope isn't suitable for photography. Keep the exposures short and at low magnification any inaccuracies in the tracking won't show. Be careful though. If you get seriously bitten by the bug the GAS is like nothing you've ever known................:(
     
  6. StewartR

    StewartR Efrem Zimbalist Jr Advertiser

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    Lovely. What kind of focal length / aperture does your 200mm telescope equate to? Is it something like 800mm f/4 or 1000mm f/5?
     
  7. Jannyfox

    Jannyfox

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    That's a good question Stewart. The honest answer is I don't know as it's not my scope and I've never asked, but I would think somewhere around 1000mm. I think it's too long to be 800mm.
     
  8. JohnC6

    JohnC6

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    I don't usually come into this forum,Jan. I didn't realise you did this. I'm mightily impressed. Beats locos on a dull and sometimes wet day..Lol.

    I used to go storm chasing in the US and one of the guides has an observatory in his garden..back yard as they say. I thought you'd like to take a look.He lives in Pennsylvania and a well-respected chaser too.

    As you see in the left side headings list it's at the bottom end...but the rest are worth a look too http://www.stormeffects.com
     
  9. Jannyfox

    Jannyfox

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    Funny what you learn about people, isn't it, John? My partner and I are both astronomers, but he likes wires and gadgets - I couldn't be bothered with it. He's on Flickr username GordonWRT though he hasn't put up any of his stuff from Portugal yet.
    Back yard observatory - that'd be nice. First you need a big enough back yard. I did like on one of the images I looked at he said his subs were shot over 4 consequtive nights - this is why the best astro imagers don't do it in the UK................
    Storm chasing.........hmmmm.........you can probably get therapy for that ;) Very impressive (scary) clouds though.
     
  10. Norkie

    Norkie

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    Excellent work, keep posting ;)
     
    Jannyfox likes this.
  11. Jannyfox

    Jannyfox

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    Next is Messier 22, a glorious globular cluster in Sagittarius, low in the sky so it's hard to see well from the UK (and impossible from my garden)

    [​IMG]Messier 22 by Jannyfox, on Flickr
     

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