Pride 2019 - London Street Photography

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544
Name
Will
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#1
Some pics I took yesterday during the London Pride parades. Any feedback is welcome. :)

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1,225
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#5
Those are very poor. There are lots of things wrong.
Your approch to Pride has been lacking it is a very easy event to photograph. You needed to get into the people and get involved. Pride people are so easy to photo.

The technical side ,focus, sharpnes, cropping are all shocking. wGBNNSWm.jpg vrgqPS9m.jpg
You have not concentrated on the one thing that matters when taking a photo. "what story am I trying to relay here".
The photos just look like snaps from someone who was passing on the way to the shops(get into the people). You have not got any eye contact ,in fact the oposite(it looks as though people are looking away and not involved. 8zFkJATm.jpg
 
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4,538
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Simon
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#6
Those are very poor. There are lots of things wrong.
Your approch to Pride has been lacking it is a very easy event to photograph. You needed to get into the people and get involved. Pride people are so easy to photo.

The technical side ,focus, sharpnes, cropping are all shocking.
You have not concentrated on the one thing that matters when taking a photo. "what story am I trying to relay here".
The photos just look like snaps from someone who was passing on the way to the shops(get into the people). You have not got any eye contact ,in fact the oposite(it looks as though people are looking away and not involved.
When I see such harsh criticism I always find it useful to see some of the writer's work to get an idea where they're coming from. Care to share?
 
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Name
Phil Maddocks
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#7
Those are very poor. There are lots of things wrong.
Your approch to Pride has been lacking it is a very easy event to photograph. You needed to get into the people and get involved. Pride people are so easy to photo.

The technical side ,focus, sharpnes, cropping are all shocking. View attachment 249572 View attachment 249573
You have not concentrated on the one thing that matters when taking a photo. "what story am I trying to relay here".
The photos just look like snaps from someone who was passing on the way to the shops(get into the people). You have not got any eye contact ,in fact the oposite(it looks as though people are looking away and not involved. View attachment 249582
I feel the critique is valid but you could have delivered it in a less demoralising and demotivating manner.

Will - like the others have said the focus is out in some of the photos, but once you tell us the settings you used for the majority of photos we'll be able to help you understand why.

I was also at Pride taking photos on Regent street (opposite Hamleys), was a great parade, shame the weather wasn't a little bit better. Hope you enjoyed it!
 
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#8
When I see such harsh criticism I always find it useful to see some of the writer's work to get an idea where they're coming from. Care to share?
You should not need anyone elses work to look at to see the faults in those photos.

The person wants to take better photos so he needs to be told straight.
 
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Hi Ho Silver away !
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#9
I shoot the Brighton Gay Pride ever year and have done for about 4 yrs, it is one of the easiest things to photograph imo. I agree most are not in focus so it might be too slow a shutter speed or you just missed focus. Of the set the mobile phone shot is the better one.
 
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Phil Maddocks
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#11
The shutter speed for most of these were 1/2500, although I guess the aperture is low (f1.8/2 for most).
So it wasn't the shutter speed then because that is more than fast enough.

If I had to guess because of the low aperture, your depth of field was quite tight, and looking at the photos again you can see parts of them are sharp, just not the main subject. So your lens is either back/front focusing or your focus point was not on your subject. i.e. photo of the guy with the flowers around his neck - some of the flowers are sharp but his face is not. And on the shot with the flags, the flags are sharp but the people holding them are not.

What focusing mode were you using? Single point?
 
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544
Name
Will
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#12
What focusing mode were you using? Single point?
Hmm, I was on single point, focused on the centre I believe. It's not honestly a setting I'm too familiar with though.

I think out of focus images is a regular problem I've struggled with. Would it be better to have a higher aperture? I think I generally rush stuff as well, which adds to it.

Thanks for your feedback btw :)
 
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Les
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#13
The shutter speed for most of these were 1/2500, although I guess the aperture is low (f1.8/2 for most).
May I ask why 1/2500th sec??. This seems ludicrously high to me Will - I shot a carnival last month and used my 70-200mm f2.8 & 24- 70mm f2.8 lenses average shutter speed was around 1/500th sec ISO 200 and an aperture as small as I could mange-( usually f8 or f9 as it was quite sunny - this hopefully would ensure a larger depth of field.

f1.8 /f2 is great, if you are working in a controlled environment and you can focus on the eyes of the subject - walkabout and the likes of Prides/ Carnivals I would always opt for f8 +

Les :)
 
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Phil Maddocks
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#14
May I ask why 1/2500th sec??. This seems ludicrously high to me Will - I shot a carnival last month and used my 70-200mm f2.8 & 24- 70mm f2.8 lenses average shutter speed was around 1/500th sec ISO 200 and an aperture as small as I could mange-( usually f8 or f9 as it was quite sunny - this hopefully would ensure a larger depth of field.

f1.8 /f2 is great, if you are working in a controlled environment and you can focus on the eyes of the subject - walkabout and the likes of Prides/ Carnivals I would always opt for f8 +

Les :)
When I was also shooting Pride last week my shutter speed was typically between 1/200 - 1/400 and aperture between f2.8 and f5.6 (I was using the Fuji 16-55 f2.8). f2.8 gave me enough dof when singling out individual people but I did find I had to dial it back when trying to capture larger groups of people. It didn't help that it was overcast, so I was also having to adjust the ISO a fair bit to keep the photo exposed properly at a shutter speed around 1/400
 
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Will
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#15
May I ask why 1/2500th sec??
Lack of knowledge tbh - I haven't touched the camera in years, and happy to admit I never really learned the best way of deciding settings.

I think I ended up on a high shutter speed as some initial shots I took were very blurry, and a higher shutter speed seemed to resolve most if it. I'm guessing I just wasn't holding the camera steady enough though.

I'll use a lower shutter speed and higher aperture next time round, and see if I can get more in focus images. :)
 
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Simon
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#16
You should not need anyone elses work to look at to see the faults in those photos.

The person wants to take better photos so he needs to be told straight.
Your critique is filtered by your own experience and opinions. Showing us your own work will give us an insight into why you regard the issues you've raised as so important, and allow us to form a judgement as to how much weight to attach to your opinion.

For example - I've only commented on the obvious technical stuff, not composition or content because I don't claim to be a competent reportage photographer.

An aside.. I really don't understand the reluctance of so many of the members here to post stuff their work. Surely photographs are made to be seen?
Or maybe, @shapeshifter, you're scared that you'll receive critique as unkind as that which you've posted yourself?
 
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#17
The old press photographer's mantra used to be "f/8 and be there!'", and when capturing groups of people where a reasonable depth of field is required, then it's still fair advice. In the old days, a faster film such as 400 ISO would be used on a cloudier day to give speeds of at least 1/125 to avoid camera shake and minimise motion blur, but 1/250 would have been preferred if the light would allow it at f/8. These days, auto ISO should take care of that element with most modern DSLRs.

If wanting to highlight a face in a crowd (or other such specific object) then you can choose a shallow depth of field, but your focus point will become far more critical, especially at closer range, where the end of someone's nose might be in focus but their eyes (where the focus point should usually be) may be out. It's a case of practice, trial and error, then luck once you've minimised operator error! Hope this is useful.
 
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601
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#18
I'll use a lower shutter speed and higher aperture next time round, and see if I can get more in focus images. :)
Be careful to strike a good balance on those settings. When things are moving around you need a shutter speed that is short enough to prevent camera shake. For longer lenses I usually set the camera on shutter priority at 1/500 or 1/1000. I also set the ISO to "auto".

However: don't be too bothered by other peoples' assessment of things like image sharpness. I happen to think most of your pictures are adequately sharp and some of them (such as the girl on the young man's shoulders) are quite interesting.
 
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544
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Will
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#19
Thanks everyone. :)

If wanting to highlight a face in a crowd (or other such specific object) then you can choose a shallow depth of field, but your focus point will become far more critical, especially at closer range, where the end of someone's nose might be in focus but their eyes (where the focus point should usually be) may be out.
I've often struggled with getting eyes specifically in focus, and to be honest being able to see exactly which part of the image is in focus when the display is so small. With this set there were a couple that looked okay on the camera display, but when I pulled them off the SD card were clearly focused incorrectly. It seems like I made this even more challenging for myself by having a very low aperture, whilst having to move fairly continuously through a large crowd.

A couple of those I still processed as I liked the moment, e.g. 5 and 9 above, even if the focus is off.

Be careful to strike a good balance on those settings. When things are moving around you need a shutter speed that is short enough to prevent camera shake. For longer lenses I usually set the camera on shutter priority at 1/500 or 1/1000. I also set the ISO to "auto".
At the moment I'm still moving quite a lot between AV/TV and manual, to try to check settings etc. Need a lot more practice to get the hang of balancing settings though. :)


As a general comment - the photos were taken for fun, and to try to get to grips with my camera again after several years of not using it. I'm happy enough with the photos to share them, and get constructive feedback on them to improve, so thanks to everyone who provided that.

For the more unconstructive comments... worth reminding some people that it can be fairly daunting to share images on sites like this, especially as there are so many talented photographers on here. If you give me advice on how to avoid technical issues, then I can improve. If it's just running through reasons you think the images are crap... it might be a nice to boost to your own ego... but doesn't achieve much else.
 
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David
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#20
Hi Will @WillW ... good work, there are some nice images there.

Don't be put off by the odd heavy critique.

I was there at the starting point at the top of Oxford Street, I know it's not easy -or it wasn't for me- holding camera above my head to see over the crowd in front.

Hi @shapeshifter ... your cropings are good, but I do not agree with your comments ... "You needed to get into the people and get involved. Pride people are so easy to photo". I caught a number of shots with the subject looking at the camera, smiling, responding or not. They got deleted ... not the kind of result I was looking for.

I had my Panasonic GX80+45-150mm f/4-5.6, cheap lightweight kit. Aperture Priority, Auto ISO, shooting short bursts.




I'm gonna hijack your thread Will, hoping for comments from the above posters.

6 of the "crowd" from my side of the barrier and/or across the otherside ...

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