Printer needed

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Simon
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#1
I have been offered a job next year that will require printing on site.
I've looked at this ...
Printer
However, it is just too expensive for one job.
Looking at 6x4 and a maximum of 150 photos over two days

Has anybody got a recommendation for something instead, around £150? Very fast printing is not essential but needs to have decent quality.

Many thanks
Simon.
 
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Rich
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#5
Another possibility is one of the little Canon Selphy printers with a few packs of ink and paper
Got an old one of them myself and for small prints they do a really nice job and put a coating on top to enhance and protect the print
 
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Silver Simon
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Simon
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#7
Another possibility is one of the little Canon Selphy printers with a few packs of ink and paper
Got an old one of them myself and for small prints they do a really nice job and put a coating on top to enhance and protect the print
Rich, that has been suggested by a mate and at the the mo is the one. :) I was wondering for a few more £££s there was something better. :)
 
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#8
Rich, that has been suggested by a mate and at the the mo is the one. :) I was wondering for a few more £££s there was something better. :)
Its not a bad idea Simon, don't suppose you need the latest greatest although the ink/paper packs could get a bit pricey.
Thinking more about it I can't think of a better idea, just looked at prices and it would be within budget
 
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#9
A printer is often just the start of the cost/expense equation. The question I'd be asking is how much will the combination of ink and photo-paper to suit the chosen printer actually cost me (per print) to reliably deliver an end product of sufficient quality to reasonably satisfy the client and maintain/build my professional reputation?
 
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Silver Simon
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Simon
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#10
A printer is often just the start of the cost/expense equation. The question I'd be asking is how much will the combination of ink and photo-paper to suit the chosen printer actually cost me (per print) to reliably deliver an end product of sufficient quality to reasonably satisfy the client and maintain/build my professional reputation?
The issue I have Mr B is, I don't think there is anywhere else I could use it. (I have a printer at home) This is for a music event.
I predominantly shoot sports, yes I have considered children's footy, rugby and cricket events but then I would have to start thinking about buying a gazebo, tables, card machines, having help etc. This really could be a one off, with possibly an event the following year.
It is a bit of a Catch 22. Do I get a full on event printer or go cheaper with the limitations that will bring.
 

nandbytes

I owe Cobra some bacon
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#11
Another possibility is one of the little Canon Selphy printers with a few packs of ink and paper
Got an old one of them myself and for small prints they do a really nice job and put a coating on top to enhance and protect the print
I second the dyesub options. It's quick and painless for 6x4 prints and made for OPs kind of use cases.

I use a canon selphy myself, it's really great.
 
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#12
I think the market for kids sport event photos may be on its way out, most parents have smartphones with good cameras these days. Your photos would most likely be an order of magnitude better, but their smartphone photos are free, and you can't compete with that unless it's a special 'one off' event like a cup final where they might want a single, special photo. So maybe not a business model worth much consideration these days?

As for the 'one off' job you may already have, if the cost v profit analysis stacks up, perhaps think about the potential re-sale value of a pro type printer and factor some of that into the equation? I find good quality kit tends to be easier and quicker to operate (once I've learned how to use it!) and that can save time and money when it comes to using it - how many of us have shouted at a printer because it won't print on the settings we've selected and it's just wasted half a dozen sheets of paper and half an ink cartridge while you're trying to get the results you should have had the first time?

So if you find that a good quality pro printer has got some resale value once you've used it, it might make more financial sense? The next question would be, does such a printer (that won't cost a fortune in ink and paper) actually exist?!
 
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