Beginner Some more of my daughter’s rugby #2

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Name
Mark
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#2
Definitely improving some good action shots there :)
 
OP
OP
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#4
What lens and settings are you using? The shutter speed looks far too low
Only started taking photos as one of the other dads did it but left so I thought I’d have a go so I am totally new to photography, I am using a Nikon 55-300 lens on auto sports mode at the moment, any recommendations for settings would be greatly appreciated.
 
OP
OP
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#6
I think you need to go to Shutter speed priority and dial it up to at least 1/600th. Obviously, with the 55-300 lens you're going to be on maximum aperture (5.6ish?) so ISO needs to be set to AUTO so you can get enough light.
Thanks, she has a match tomorrow so I will give it a go.
 
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Name
Maarten
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#7
Only started taking photos as one of the other dads did it but left so I thought I’d have a go so I am totally new to photography, I am using a Nikon 55-300 lens on auto sports mode at the moment, any recommendations for settings would be greatly appreciated.
Shutter speed priority is a good suggestion.

The other thing you should consider is using AF-C instead of AF-S if you're trying to get moving subjects in sharp focus. Perfornance of AF-C will depend on which Nikon body you use.
 
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#11
I don't know Nikons so I don't know when they become very noisy but then you can use something like DEFINE /UNSMARP Mask {Nik/Photoshop} to help if it's not great at noise.
 
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#12
There's a lot of poor advice being given here.

Forget software noise reduction, get the ISO right in camera and if need be reduce noise with software later.

There's no such thing as a shutter speed of 1/600. Even 1/640 isn't a great minimum for rugby. 1/1000 would be fine, with 1/1600 or higher the ideal for action.

As for what ISO to use, you must be new to photography, it depends on the conditions, no one can answer that.
 
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Mark
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#13
I would consider setting up back button focusing. Very straight forward to use. Easily find a tut on YouTube on how to set it up on your Nikon.

I would definitely use auto-iso until you get confident with the exposure triangle. Definitely aperture priority.

On Nikon’s you can set the maximum iso you want your camera to use when using auto-iso. You can also set the minimum shutter speed to use too. I would try at least 1/1000 for action as they are not fully grown adults so I can’t imagine they’ll be moving at hyper speed.

Ideally though it’s just trial and error as you get used to photographing this type of sport.
 
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Simon
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#14
My one piece of advice is get low! Sit down, use a stool preferably or kneel, wouldn't reccomend that as I know what rugby fields are like!!! :) That would be an improvement. I agree 1/640 is far too slow, anything faster than 1/1000 would be okay (the faster the better). ISO could be put on auto or do a few test shots and adjust accordingly. Back button focusing a definite! Good luck :giggle:
 
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542
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Simon
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#16
Because you can lock focus on with your thumb and if in AI Servo, (a must too, on Canon) the camera will now track your subject so you can then hit the front shutter button to shoot. I just find it such a natural thing now.

Yes, it can take time to get used to it, as with all things. When it is second nature it is so much easier and better to have seperate buttons to focus. If you need to refocus it so much easier with the back button, just pump away with your thumb, you don't have to worry about accidently taking a shot then. :)
 
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Darryl
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#19
Some advice and reaffirming some of what has been said above.

Shutter speed: try to keep above 1/1000 to 'freeze' the action, you can go slower but you run the risk of blur effects on the legs etc.
Aperture: go as wide as your lens will allow
ISO: I would set to auto 400-800, depending on the max aperture of your lens and the conditions, you could always go higher if you're not getting the shutter speed
Position: obviously you want to photograph your girl, so attacking end for her team, 5yds in from touch, get yourself a travel stool and a monopod, if your lens has a tripod mount, you'll find panning a lot easier
Back button focus: yes, always - it's second nature once you get used to it
Skill: look for the bursts of action, once you see it, it'll become second nature, tackles, drives, rucks etc. niche - the scrum-half looking over the pack is a classic, but you'll need to move position (which isn't a bad thing), personally I wouldn't bother with moves going away from you, no one needs pictures of people's backs.
Drive: continuous high, the action is often so fact you'll need that extra shot for open eyes/hidden face etc.
 
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