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  1. JohnFar

    JohnFar

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    John
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    Last year I found this spot and, whilst it is hardly the Tetons and Snake River, I kind of like it as a view of Tryfan. But the day I found it the clouds were all wrong. Attempt 2, also last summer, had ideal clouds but the grass was that horrid summer green (so the images are OK in b+w). Trip 3 last month was a disaster as the sun was shining. Trip 4 - well, you can see the picture. The sun hit the foreground about 30 s after this shot. I don't like the sky. So there'll have to be a fifth attempt before the grass greens up. _JFF4762nc2.jpg
     
  2. SFTPhotography

    SFTPhotography Top Cat

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    Steve
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    I like it but whats wrong with the grass being lovely and green? To me that's more attractive than the yellow/brown colours of spring and winter.
     
  3. JohnFar

    JohnFar

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    Guess it's personal taste. I often try to see in b+w in these hills in summer, really find it hard to marry the green of the grass with anything else in the scene.
     
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  4. Kodiak Qc

    Kodiak Qc

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    French Canadian living in Europe since 1989!
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    :agree: colours here are a very positive asset!
     
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  5. SFTPhotography

    SFTPhotography Top Cat

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    I've noticed this with a lot of UK photographers being quite adverse to summer. It must be a taste thing - I happen to think its a beautiful season and with clouds and light like your OP the scene would look great. Its a great composition - nice late evening or morning light, - some colour in the skies, and some purple heather this could be mega in August and again in Autumn when the moorland goes almost red.
     
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  6. Danny-K

    Danny-K

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    This would be great at sunset I bet. Is this at the top of the waterfall?
     
  7. jerry12953

    jerry12953

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    Jeremy Moore
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    Steve, I agree with you about winter colours. It's as if everything has been greyed out. Roll on the spring (although it will be late spring before the grass up there goes green....)

    John, It's a nice composition, and as ever (or as usual, anyway) it's a case of try, try and try again.
     
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  8. SFTPhotography

    SFTPhotography Top Cat

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    Its usually mid to late May before it turns green - up here anwyay. Lovely time to be out just as the season turns. Unless there is a good covering of snow, winter holds no real interest for me. Good time to do coastal stuff as the sea doesn't go "bare and brown"
     
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  9. jerry12953

    jerry12953

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    Jeremy Moore
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    From about late-April onwards (here) new leaves on the trees stand out beautifully against the browns of last year's grasses. All the greens are different shades for a couple of weeks until by the end of May/early June when all vegetation is just a mass of an identical shade of green. That's when landscape photography in summer can be a drag.
     
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  10. ancient_mariner

    ancient_mariner

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    Toni
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    I suspect the problem with summer green grass is that many find it hard to control colours, and their images end up with lurid shades of nuclear fallout coloured grass. With more subdued colours, they can either be left 'as is' or given a gentle boost to make the image pop a little more, and that's psychologically easier than dialling back saturation and vibrance or getting into HSL.
     
  11. JohnFar

    JohnFar

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    John
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    Isn't this interesting! It's so personal. Over-saturated colours, a mix of strong colours in a single image, can make an image that (to me anyway) just SHOUTS. I don't like landscapes that SHOUT. So a more muted, less saturated, and limited palette can be far more satisfying - to me!. Perhaps one way of putting it is the difference between an image that is striking and grabs your attention, versus a quieter one that you want to return to. Jerry is right about summer greens - it's only when leaves are appearing that there are differences in hue that can make a picture. And Toni is right about saturation (though even when I desaturate and play with mountain summer greens they still usually end up horrid); similarly it's easy to tank up the orange in winter grasses (eg via an Olympus sensor, as well as in post).
     
  12. Nguss

    Nguss

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    Lovely composition and the colours for me are spot on. I love this type of processing but never achieve it myself.
     
  13. ancient_mariner

    ancient_mariner

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    Just remember that 'striking' appeals to the non-togger population, while delicate, subtle, muted, natural generally works for people like us. See Facebook/Flickr/Instagram for examples. ;)
     
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  14. JohnFar

    JohnFar

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    John
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    Danny K - if you're referring to the Afon Lloer, there are several waterfalls; this place is at about 600 m altitude and 0.5 km east of the Lloer.
    Nguss - thanks; not so much my processing as the light on the day.
     

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