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  1. andy700

    andy700

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    3,824
    Name:
    andy
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I would like to find out if anyone else views their images on a HD television screen. Last year I did the wedding shots for a friend, printed some out for them and gave them the memory stick. The colour saturation on the printed images looked very natural and exactly like the images viewed on my desktop monitor. However, when I presented the couple with the Sandisk USB flash drive, the first thing they did was to view it on their telly, and the colours were shocking, really oversaturated.
    This weekend I tried the same thing on our telly and the results were just the same - shocking, oversaturated colours. The prints and monitor images looked fine though.
    I went through the menu section on our TV (LG plasma) and the current setting for "picture" is "Cinema" which for everyday viewing is very realistic. Some of the other settings are very vivid indeed, and I wouldn''t dream of using them.
    I realise that a lot of folks will want to view images on a TV, so is there a way around this problem?
     
  2. drounding

    drounding

    Messages:
    960
    Name:
    Duncan
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I doubt there will be universal way to resolve this. Perhaps consider putting a text image at the beginning of the set explaining why the saturation may look unnatural on TVs etc..
     
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  3. ecoleman

    ecoleman

    Messages:
    3,734
    Name:
    Elliott
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    Yes
    TV's are not calibrated and most are usually set for showroom conditions straight out of the box. This means the screen is set way to bright and over saturated so it looks good under the lights of a typical showroom. Unfortunately most people take the TV out of the box and turn it on and that's how it stays.
     
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  4. Meyssonnier

    Meyssonnier

    Messages:
    415
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    I think most TVs can be set to RGB. I leave mine set to this without any problems.
     
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  5. st599

    st599

    Messages:
    1,411
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    No
    Does it look oversaturated when you play a video via the USB port?

    Is there a setting for pixel range? Could it be stuck in video range?
     
  6. GreenNinja67

    GreenNinja67

    Messages:
    2,664
    Name:
    Terry
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Advise people to go to Currys and buy their CD calibration for TV's.

    It's about a tenner I think. A friend told me about it.

    @flashp , is this info still current?
     
  7. Eloise

    Eloise

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    1,049
    Name:
    Eloise
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  8. Chappers

    Chappers

    Messages:
    5,339
    Name:
    John
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    No
    TV's work with a limited range compared to computer monitors. This is something you have to be aware of when producing video's for different sources. Most professional video editing apps will have video scopes so that you can insure your video is within Broadcast Standard levels. These tend to to have lower dynamic range than those seen within monitors. TV's tend to expect that any input works within these parameters. It is possible that your images are outside what the TV is set up to receive. It may be also complicated if the TV is set to give enhanced pictures to make the TV programmes look impressive. I did an experiment some time ago with a short video which look stunning on the computer monitor, but when transferred to the TV had blown highlights, solid shadows and really didn't look nice at all. Re editing and keeping the video within the broadcast limits made all the difference
     
  9. Orangecroc

    Orangecroc

    Messages:
    2,471
    Name:
    Ben
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    Yes
    You'll probably find that gamers will have TVs set up better than your average Joe. I always have to tone down the settings when I get a new TV as they are set up to grab attention in the showrooms. Every TV I have ever bought has needed the temperature changed, the brightness and the contrast turned down.
     
  10. paulw77

    paulw77

    Messages:
    45
    Edit My Images:
    No
    The Cinema picture setting is normally pretty accurate (for video at least).

    It's the Dynamic setting you want to avoid !
     

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