Why am I still buying light bulbs

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3,283
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mike
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#1
Over the last 3 or 4 years all the light bulbs i have bought offered me a 7 to 15 year life span, so why have i had to replace them already?
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10,581
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Toni
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#2
Marketing and poor mathematics.

Where we live in a village the electricity supply is not steady. We would be replacing halogen bulbs every month and conventional incandescent types would last less than a year. I replaced a bunch of the halogens with some early LED types, and they all failed within a year. Better quality LEDs seem to last 2-3 years, and low energy fluorescents get close to that as well.
 
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#4
When we moved into our new house I replaced every bulb with a decent quality LED bulbs. That was October 2018 and haven't had to chance one yet.

Halogens are rubbish and don't last 5 minutes. You can also get some really crap LED bulbs. As they say, buy cheap, buy twice.
Would expect to have to change any bulbs after just 5 months either
 
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10,389
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Rich
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#6
I have a 100w bulb in a light outside my back door that I bought in Woolworths Boxing Day sale in 1998.
It was one of three in a box for a quid, been in use ever since and still burns bright.
Bought it when we first moved to the house and reckon when it packs up the time has come for us to move
 
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14,637
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Simon
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#7
Halogens in kitchen seem to last a year or 2, the ones in lounge around a year. I did think that when I used to put them in by hand they would last a few months, but now use a sock as a glove and they last longer. Something around oils in your skin not being great... probably not true!
 
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4,852
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Elliott
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#8
Halogens in kitchen seem to last a year or 2, the ones in lounge around a year. I did think that when I used to put them in by hand they would last a few months, but now use a sock as a glove and they last longer. Something around oils in your skin not being great... probably not true!
Halogen car bulbs usually come with a foam or paper sleave around the bulb for this reason. I don't know how much truth is in it, but have always been told not to touch the bulb with bar fingers.
 

sirch

Official Forum Numpty 2015
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7,526
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Chris
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#9
I've got incandescents that must be more than 15 years old, none of the CFLs and LEDs that I've put in over the last few years have lasted more than 2-3 years. It's a complete scam, the money and environmental savings from reduced energy use* are massively outweighed by the cost and environmental impact of manufacturing and disposal of "energy saving" bulbs

* which isn't really reduced energy use because the "waste" energy is heat and so contributes a little to heating the house.
 
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10,581
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Toni
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#10
Halogen car bulbs usually come with a foam or paper sleave around the bulb for this reason. I don't know how much truth is in it, but have always been told not to touch the bulb with bar fingers.
We still have a small rubber device with a sucker on one end for this very purpose, plus it also makes it much easier to remove & replace bulbs in a recessed lamp fitting.

* which isn't really reduced energy use because the "waste" energy is heat and so contributes a little to heating the house.
This is a bit valid, but it's heat at ceiling level, which won't make you feel warmer unless you have a fan.
 
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7,831
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Robert
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#11
I have a 100w bulb in a light outside my back door that I bought in Woolworths Boxing Day sale in 1998.
It was one of three in a box for a quid, been in use ever since and still burns bright.
Bought it when we first moved to the house and reckon when it packs up the time has come for us to move
How the f*** would you remember that?
 
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6,433
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Graham
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#12
All bulbs in our house are now LED with most of them being LED for years now, even the rear security light/camera system is LED. Only had one LED needing to be changed and surprise, surprise it was a DIALL one - the only bulb I bought from B&Q. Many are from IKEA and seem to be very good. I also love how you can seriously increase the lumens safety using LED because the wattage is much lower such as a 100W equivalent regular bulb only needs a 14W LED to produce 1500 lumens :)
 
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4,842
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Rob
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#14
Halogens in kitchen seem to last a year or 2, the ones in lounge around a year. I did think that when I used to put them in by hand they would last a few months, but now use a sock as a glove and they last longer. Something around oils in your skin not being great... probably not true!
Whenever I installed halogen floodlights I was always told never to touch the lamp with bare hands as it would cause premature failure. Found this to explain it (you were right about oils on the skin):

A common cause of early failure for quartz halogen bulbs is surface contamination, and the most likely source of contamination comes from touching the glass portion of the bulb with bare skin. Even clean skin will leave behind oils. This contamination causes a hot spot when the bulb is operated, which can result in cracks or bubbles that will allow halogen gas to leak out, resulting in early failure.

https://www.bulbs.com/blogs/light_s...z-Halogens-Handle-With-Care!.aspx?mobile=true

Most Halogen lamps have been banned (Sept 2018) so it will soon be hard getting replacements.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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31,266
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#15
Just bought 4 halogen candle bulbs/lamps. The fittings they're for are touch dimmable so LEDs aren't suitable. Not much used (the fittings) so the 4 bulbs should last a fair few years (last bulb is ~10 years old). Better than binning the fitting! Might convert them to simple on/off switched (inline switches) and bypass the dimmers when the bulbs are all gone.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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31,266
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#16
Whenever I installed halogen floodlights I was always told never to touch the lamp with bare hands as it would cause premature failure. Found this to explain it (you were right about oils on the skin):

There are 2 broad categories of halogen lamps, naked and enclosed. Naked types (such as G9, floodlight bars and headlights) shouldn't be touched for the reasons above but the enclosed type (candle style and other household types) can be handled like the old tungsten bulbs since you're touching the outer envelope rather than the sensitive one.
 
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