Wrapping prints and packaging

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Nightmare
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#1
I'm taking over all printing for my site so this is the final thing to work out - packing those nice big poster-sized prints in a presentable, safe and secure manner.

Anything over A3 size or so will more than likely come from a roll of paper and will have a bit of curl - something I presume the buyer designated framer would have to deal with. It gets very pronounced to the end of the roll.

I can see it either rolled up and packed that way, just like the original roll of paper or sent "flat" (as far as possible) in a large thin box. Is either much preferable or both valid and reasonable?

Finally, would I have to get some wrapping paper, and if so what would I have to look for please?

There is a local company doing cardboard boxes so I'll talk to them in the first instance for whatever the dimensions are needed, as above. Just to double check does it have to be any special acid-free variety, or whatever?

Finally, does anyone bother with certificates of authenticity and all those stickers?


Maybe it's Talk business topic, I am not sure...
 
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wayne clarke
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#2
I suspect flat will end in tears if your post is like mine, rolled in a cardboard tube makes it a bit harder for them to mangle it.
 
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#3
Just FWIW

As a customer I have had larger prints delivered in cardboard tubes. I was getting the same prints (2 of them) from two sources.

Both rolled them with acid free tissue paper interleaving, much as I would have expected, but......and this is IMO a key thing to consider. The paper weight i.e. how thick it is and the diameter of the cardboard tube.

I cannot recall right now which supplier used the heavier paper but one came in approx a 1.75" tube and the other in a 4" tube.

Suffice to say both lots needed some level of decurling & flattening and I never got them completely flat! But my preference would always be for the larger diameter tube where possible :)
 
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Peter
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#4
Whenever I've had large images printed on to paper the print companies have always packaged them in cardboard tubes.
With prints on Foamex, Aluminium etc. they are packed in flat cardboard boxes with various methods (some better than others) used inside the box to hold the printed material steady during transport.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#5
I suspect flat will end in tears if your post is like mine, rolled in a cardboard tube makes it a bit harder for them to mangle it.

Probably an urban legend but there was a tale of an envelope with a "Photographs do not bend" sticker on it with a hand written note of "Yes they do".

When I've sent prints, A4s have gone in board backed envelopes with an extra layer of corrugated cardboard on the opposite side of the print to the board and most A3s have gone in cardboard tubes. Th exceptions being one A3 which I sent to a friend in Greece which went in a length of plastic downpipe and another that had to be flat so was sandwiched between two suitably sized bits of 3mm plywood. Both arrived undamaged.
 
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#6
Probably an urban legend but there was a tale of an envelope with a "Photographs do not bend" sticker on it with a hand written note of "Yes they do".
Or the improved sticker:-
Photographs, please do not bend.

Though a bit like the punctuation making the difference:-
The Panda eats shoots and leaves
vs a killer panda
The Panda eats, shoots and leaves

But I digress, it is possible to go OTT on wrapping but done sensibly with the product and it's journey in mind as @Nod says it/they should get there undamaged :)
 
OP
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LongLensPhotography
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Nightmare
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#7
I suspect flat will end in tears if your post is like mine, rolled in a cardboard tube makes it a bit harder for them to mangle it.
Do you mean a round tube or an actual rectangle of similar dimensions? Tube is probably stronger...

acid free tissue paper
Are there any specific ones I should look out for?
 
OP
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LongLensPhotography
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Nightmare
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#9
Slightly related....but have just received some rolled prints from DSCL which reflect horribly when framed. Any tips on how to flatten them out? I've always received prints flat in a backed envelope, so I'm quite dissapointed with these.
Did your framer not take care of it? I imagine it would be their job. Even if it was flat packed it would still have a slight curl from the original roll; and much worse if it was end of the roll.
Other than that I would suggest maybe going for a less glossy paper to to go behind glass if reflections are an issue, also look into "museum" glass
 
OP
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LongLensPhotography
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Nightmare
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#11
I frame my own prints generally, and I don't have the knowledge or desire to learn how to mount (which I assume would get rid of the curl) - I'd rather just pay Loxley to do it for me!
I believe a good mount and backing board are essential. Your local framer should be able to help if you don't have the tools to do it (neither do I).
 

nandbytes

I owe Cobra some bacon
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#13
I have had both and as mentioned about the "Do not bend" envelops can end in tears or rather you having to redo the print (I simply ended up requesting a refund).

I'd go with with the cylinder tubes for individual prints. if you have multiple large prints stacking them in a thin cardboard box (like the one photo papers come in) might be fine.
 
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Norman
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#14
Probably an urban legend but there was a tale of an envelope with a "Photographs do not bend" sticker on it with a hand written note of "Yes they do".

When I've sent prints, A4s have gone in board backed envelopes with an extra layer of corrugated cardboard on the opposite side of the print to the board and most A3s have gone in cardboard tubes. Th exceptions being one A3 which I sent to a friend in Greece which went in a length of plastic downpipe and another that had to be flat so was sandwiched between two suitably sized bits of 3mm plywood. Both arrived undamaged.
Not a urban legend as such. I worked as a postman and for the most part the posties did actually care for the mail in their care. All bar the bad apple. One guy was known to have written "but they fold" and did just that making sure there was a sharp crease down the middle. Items are transported in sacks piled up it cages if too large to go in trays and too small to to be stacked loose in the cage. Far better to add strong protection although size & weight effect cost of postage.

Ah good idea I hadn't considered that I can just ask them to back the print for me. Cheers.
Have you asked for a 'bulk price' from a local framer? If they frame, package & post as part of a service you may get a discount if you send more than XXX items a month.

Failing that it may be worth getting yourself a franking machine, the savings may be worth the hire/purchase price.
 
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