35mm focal length

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#1
how useful do people find the 35mm focal length? I have a 50mm and a 28mm for my canon a1. It’s basically a new lens or a bulk roll of hp5 :)
 
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#2
Ben, I reckon you're talking a couple of steps forward if using the 28mm or a couple of steps back if using the 50mm. I think you'd learn a lot more from investing in the film. (y)
 
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Ben johns
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#4
Ben, I reckon you're talking a couple of steps forward if using the 28mm or a couple of steps back if using the 50mm. I think you'd learn a lot more from investing in the film. (y)
Most likely. I’ve used film for 2 years, only ever 50mm lens with the canon, probably just feeling like a change. I was mainly looking at it as I don’t like having zoom lenses or more than one lens (unless I think I’ll really need it). If I have more than one I start to faff around too much :)
 
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Ben johns
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#5
It's my preferred focal length as it matches what I see better than 50 or 28mm.

I'd get a 35mm if you wanted to travel light with only one lens as it covers most 'standard' lens bases. Otherwise if your happy taking both 28 and 50mm around, get the HP5 ;)
To be honest taking both to places wouldn’t be a big deal I just like to have one on a Camera and leave it but to be fair it’s been uncommon that I’ve thought my 50mm is too tight, usually inside. I’ve taken it to the zoo and stuff and never had a problem, it’s the focal I leave on a6000
 
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#6
It is the only lens I have on my Nikon FE2 and the only lens I own for my Olympus EM5 Mk II Digital.

I am hooked on the 35mm view
 
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#7
Some people love 'em others don't. I'm one of the don't. For 36x24 I prefer 24 - 50 - 100 and if pushed I'd drop the 50. Everyone's mileage varies when it comes to focal lengths. That's why so many were made and still are made.
 
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#8
I very much like the 35mm focal length, and would use it as a normal carry-around lens in many situations. But if I already had the 28 and 50, I'm not sure I'd bother. You might have to crop a bit more off using the 28, but it should be fine.
 
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#9
To be honest taking both to places wouldn’t be a big deal I just like to have one on a Camera and leave it but to be fair it’s been uncommon that I’ve thought my 50mm is too tight, usually inside. I’ve taken it to the zoo and stuff and never had a problem, it’s the focal I leave on a6000
Edit - Ignore me, I'm a numpty :D
 
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#10
If you're using a 35mm lens on the A6000, that's pretty much equivalent to a 24mm your A1 in terms of effective field of view. If you put a 35mm lens on your A1, it's more like a 24mm lens on your A6000.
Steve, you're really confusing me there. I thought a 35mm lens on a crop factor camera (eg A6000) would be equivalent to a 1.5 times longer lens on the A1, ie 52.5 mm? Have you got your sums the wrong way up?

(And have you triple-checked the measurements for our Chroma cameras? :D:D:D)
 

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#13
On film, I used to use 24 (or 28), 50 and 135 mm lenses since that gave me a decent wide angle (to me, 35mm was a bit not wider enough than 50mm to bother with), a "standard" and a short telephoto/portrait lens. In the modern era (zooms rather than primes), I have all eventualities covered (pretty much) and still prefer a fairly wide separation between standard and wide, using a 12-24 as the wide option and a 24-120 as a "standard" zoom, rarely shooting in the middle of the 24-120's range.

However, That's MY preference, as Slyelessar has said, try a 35mm to see if you like it!
 
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#14
Its all about distortion for me so it kinda matters what the correction is like on specific lenses.
I like 35 because nearly everyone can make one with a varying degree of limited distortion, not so 28.
I'm not likely to shoot 28, if its gonna be wide and distorted I might as well go the whole hog with a daft 20 and take the bends on the chin.
35 is a great length...:)
 

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#15
For me personally, my desirable focal lengths are everywhere but 50mm on full frame. It's also not just about taking steps forward or backward to get the same components in the frame, as that ignores the fact that they offer different perspectives.

Get the lengths you want, figure out which you like the best, and sell the ones you don't use.

That's my perspective anyway :)
 

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#16
You haven't said whether you'll be producing images for projection, so I'll assume you won't and you can ignore the last paragraph. When I was using negative films, if I wanted to travel light I took a 21mm and a 90mm macro lens and nothing else. They covered the bases that interested me - from which you'll gather that motor sports and birds didn't enter my field of view; which is another way of saying that what's useful for one person (because of they way they see the world - the perspective) and their choice of subjects won't apply across the board to everyone for all subjects. If I took a third lens, it would have been the 50mm f/1.4 simply because of the speed if needed. The old advice (= given in the 1960s) was to choose your lens on a doubling/halving of focal length - so assuming the standard 50mm, you'd add a 25mm (or thereabouts) as a wide angle, and then 100mm/200mm etc. as longer. That said, the normal trinity was 35mm/50mm/135mm. 35mm wasn't a focal length I found useful, but photojournalists did. Horses for courses applies.

It's been many years since I was a serious user of 35mm, and in those days I used either black and white film or Kodachrome. Never colour print film. The difference between slide and print film is that slide film is used (by me, anyway) to give a projected image. And a slide show where every image is a different size because of the different amounts of masking isn't fun to experience. Hence, with slide film, you either cropped carefully in camera by changing position (sometimes with a deletrerious effect because changing position changes perspective), were very lucky with the exact focal length you had with you, or you used a zoom. I used a zoom. With negatives, you can crop to produce the print, and, within reason, no one will notice.
 
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#17
It is the only lens I have on my Nikon FE2
This is my go-to travel 35mm film set up as well - FE2, 35mm f/2. Wide enough for me, close enough for me.

To be honest taking both to places wouldn’t be a big deal I just like to have one on a Camera and leave it but to be fair it’s been uncommon that I’ve thought my 50mm is too tight, usually inside. I’ve taken it to the zoo and stuff and never had a problem, it’s the focal I leave on a6000
I used the zoom on my digital camera to find out as well - 28mm was too wide, 50mm was okay but sometimes a little too tight. Try it - what's the harm? Most 35mm lenses on the popular systems hold their value well.
 
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#18
Steve, you're really confusing me there. I thought a 35mm lens on a crop factor camera (eg A6000) would be equivalent to a 1.5 times longer lens on the A1, ie 52.5 mm? Have you got your sums the wrong way up?

(And have you triple-checked the measurements for our Chroma cameras? :D:D:D)
Apologies, I was typing my post while on a work call and clearly wasn't concentrating on either the post or my call!

I promise I've used much better maths when designing Chroma ;)

By way of making up for my mistake, this site might help the OP compare focal lengths. If you choose your settings by sensor size you can use APS-C and 35mm formats to compare focal lengths and the effect on depth of field.

https://dofsimulator.net/en/
 
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Ben johns
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#19
Apologies, I was typing my post while on a work call and clearly wasn't concentrating on either the post or my call!

I promise I've used much better maths when designing Chroma ;)

By way of making up for my mistake, this site might help the OP compare focal lengths. If you choose your settings by sensor size you can use APS-C and 35mm formats to compare focal lengths and the effect on depth of field.

https://dofsimulator.net/en/
I like that dof sim! I did actually use a zoom lens to see the difference between 35mm and 50mm and it is very slight, plus I want to get a 25a red filter for landscape stuff so might leave it at the moment.
 
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#20
Does anyone know the best place to get 77mm red 25a in the uk? I’ve been looking and it seems like Hoya make them but I’ve only seen them on b&h
 

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#21

GTG

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#22
It is one of the most useful focal lengths available hence its popularity and widespread use...

It is no coincidence Fuji have 23mm fixed lenses on their x100 line. Its like a 35 on film
 
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#23
the great thing for me about 35mm is it just fits with what my eye sees and hence just raising my camera up i feel the shot is allready framed
 
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#24
Does anyone know the best place to get 77mm red 25a in the uk? I’ve been looking and it seems like Hoya make them but I’ve only seen them on b&h
I'd be tempted to post a Wanted ad on here first, since there will probably be someone who'll have one tucked away in a drawer.
 
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