Beginner BEST WAY TO LEARN PHOTOGRAPHY ?

Messages
2,153
Edit My Images
Yes
#41
I don't see "Photography" as a subject but as a group of related but separate techniques/specialities,
in fact being really really good at one aspect might make another aspect crazily difficult ... just a thought : I never learned it myself.
 
Messages
26
Name
geoff
Edit My Images
Yes
#42
I went to night school , watched loads of you tube tutorials. Photography workshops ,bought courses on EBay and still learning.
 
Messages
8
Name
Tim
Edit My Images
Yes
#43
I have had my 1300d about a year now and only now beginning to understand how to use it, even though I have been interested in photography on and of for years. Some of the pictures in the Gallery are really inspiring. Just recently started to use back button focusing and also have started playing around with aperture priority. I am still trying to figure out how to make the most of my lenses particularly for wildlife.
 
Messages
7
Name
Mick
Edit My Images
Yes
#44
Being new to digital I bought “A Year With My Camera” Emma Davies. However I elected not to follow the Facebook element for personal reasons. Learned a lot about the theory and found putting each element or chapter into practice certainly helped. As mentioned earlier taking images is the best way to learn.
 
Messages
669
Name
Kell
Edit My Images
Yes
#45
I sort of stumbled into it.

I applied to join a Graphics course, but they wouldn't accept me as I hadn't taken art to A level.

So I had to take a year out and complete that course. As it was only one day a week I needed to fill the other days, so also chose History of Art and Photography. Bought a SH Minolta X500 and started taking shots. Most of the course seemed to revolve around darkroom processing, rather than image taking and most of the stuff I learned, I quickly forgot once the course was completed. That was in 1992.

Didn't really get the 'bug' for photography till many years later, when I bought my first digital camera in 2003. (Pentax Optio 550.) this allowed for far more instantaneous results, but I wish I knew more back then. That camersa would take RAW shots, but I din't know anything about PP. In fact, I didn't even own a PC at home in those days, so stored everything on my computer at work. Even though I'd finally gone 'digital', back then you were still fairly limited to how many shots you could take as memory cards were very small and very expensive. I think it was about £1 per MB. For a trip to the states, I bought one 64MB SD card and it was almost £70. I also bought a Belkin device that attached to an iPod and transferred the images to the iPod. As otherwise the memory card was full after about 30 images or so.

Went through a succession of Panasonic Lumix cameras that didn't further the bug. If anything, they were massively disappointing.

Then for my 40th birthday, I got my first DSLR - a Canon 600D. And that's really when the bug properly took hold.

In some ways I'm lucky in that I work with a lot of world class photographers, but in other ways, it's hard to learn much from them by discussing stuff, more a case of seeing what they do on shoots.

I'm torn on whether learning in 'the old days' is better or worse.

While I agree that it's definitely cheaper to learn with a modern DSLR compared to a film camera, the very fact that film and processing were expensive meant you were forced into considering your settings a little more and attempt to get it right first time. Every image had a physical cost to it.

The problem with that is that unless you had the disposable income, I guess you'd default to the things you know would work, rather than experiment in the same way as a digital camera allows.

Horses for courses.

I do think learning the technical aspect is massively important though. I can take quite nice images if the conditions are right. But I know next to nothing about lighting a scene or how to cope when conditions aren't right. It's a constant learning process for someone like me and I regularly find myself making the most amateur of mistakes.

Last time I went out with my camera, for instance, I managed to somehow have the ISO set to 1600 on a fairly bright day, while outdoors.
 
Messages
37
Name
Chris
Edit My Images
No
#46
I practiced composition firstly with my camera on 'Auto' but in the last couple of years I've yearned to do more professional looking / creative photography so last year I did an online course with Udemy which wasn't bad considering it cost me about £10. I've also been watching a couple of TV programs including Master Of Photography and whilst I don't always agree with the judges I have learned some techniques and skills and above all, look for the details....
I don't class myself as a pro by any means and I even think I'm just developing at an enthusiasts level.
Hope this helps.
 
Messages
16
Name
Ian
Edit My Images
Yes
#48
My Dad gave me a Zenit EM in 1980 and he explained exposure, depth of field and composition. I’m still not a good photographer, but I enjoy shooting with a Zenit B to bring back some happy memories.
 
Messages
3
Name
Adrian
Edit My Images
No
#49
I also began my learning experience in the late 70's with a 35mm film Canon and since that time I have only really been using underwater camera whilst diving but I have today bought a Sony A7 and really looking forward to getting back inti=o it. However, like many things in life, technology has moved on apace and I am struggling to get my head around what is now available/being used but I will persevere and hopefully will enjoy the learning process
 
Top