1. bbg404

    bbg404

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    1,261
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    Ben
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    So I’ve lived happily for about 2 years with the router next to my pc and using Powerline adaptors downstairs in the living room but more frequently the Powerline adaptors are becoming a nightmare to reconnect to each other!

    Basically my set up was

    Main photo editing pc in office with printer and router in that room everything worked perfect and fast was constantly getting 20mbps

    Down stairs I’d have the Powerline adaptor connected to the BT tv box and Xbox, Wi-fi worked but only in the living room not the dining room (although both rooms are one)

    I’ve moved the router downstairs so that I get Wi-fi all downstairs and the Xbox and tv are wired to the router

    BUT now I’m lucky if the pc gets 5 mbps, it’s not the pc as in short its rapid

    What’s my options other than moving it back which I don’t really want to do ...... can I run and Ethernet cable outside and in to the office??
     
  2. neil_g

    neil_g

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    31,086
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    Neil
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    No
    external grade cat5e, sure if that an option. it's going to be the fastest speed option.

    otherwise something like the mesh systems of google or tplink will also work.
     
    onomatopoeia likes this.
  3. Foxbat Flyer

    Foxbat Flyer

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    969
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    Chris
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    Are you by any chance using Netgear power-line adapters? My reason for asking is that I had a lot of problems with Netgear power-line adapters, changing to BT branded devices cured the problem and never experience drop-outs.

    Chris
     
    WillyB likes this.
  4. keeweeman

    keeweeman

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    548
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    Col
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    there isn't really a one size fits all solution with networking really as it depends on a few things like budget, effort level on your part and knowledge level (although since that can largely be gained using online guides it is less essential than the first two. The simplest solution is a nest setup which will give you wifi throughout the house but it comes at a fairly hefty price currently while the tech is still taking off. The cheapest option is to buy yourself some cat5/6 cable and run it from the router to the upstairs but this is where the effort comes in because its the faff of routing, drilling holes, making ethernet terminations at each end of the cable etc (all very straight forward stuff but a lot more faff than a nest system). The middle options are probably to get a second router and create a wifi access point where it basically connects to the network and bounces the signal out from its location, or depending what your wifi dongle is like on the main pc look to upgrade it for one with bigger aerials etc and see if that helps.

    ethernet cable outside is perfectly fine, just make sure you get external grade stuff as its much more weather resistant and durable than internal spec stuff, it just doesn't bend as easily
     
  5. seaodyssey

    seaodyssey

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    1,055
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    Pete
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    I have 4 1200 Netgear power line adaptors, now sitting in a box and I have gone back to Netgear 200 PL which are rock solid, but slower. The PL1200 drop out due to power saving not working correctly. Apparently if you get some software from Develo ? for their 1200 PL adaptors you can disable the power saving on the netgear as they use the same chip. I have yet to try it out. There are more details on an internet forum somewhere if you google it.

    Pete
     
  6. nuttyboy78

    nuttyboy78

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    799
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    nutty
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    Yes
    If the powerline adapters worked before and don't now, the easiest option would be to buy new ones.

    As said above, the best option would be Ethernet cables. If that's not possible, you can convert any old router you have lying about into a WAP that will boost your signal. I have used all 3 options when connecting up the various rooms in my house (4 TVs and a home cinema) and I will always prefer Ethernet as it causes the least problems.
     
  7. GeeJay57

    GeeJay57

    Messages:
    1,761
    Name:
    Glenn
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    Yes
    FWIW, we have a lot of trouble getting WiFi through into the study, so our Mac is connected to the router via TP-Link power line adaptors and currently getting about 26Mbps. On a good day, we get 35Mbps from an iPad or laptop sitting next to the router.
     
  8. Byker28i

    Byker28i

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    21,148
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    This, I've just done this for my neighbour. External cat 5 is stiff so it's easier to terminate it into cat 5 wall socket as you just punch the wires in. Then use patch leads from these. Much neater solution
     
    bbg404 likes this.
  9. bbg404

    bbg404

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    1,261
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    Ben
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    I think I’m going down the cat5e cable route just looking at the cables on line I’ll either buy them and do it my self or pay someone to come out and do a neater job but I’ve just borrowed a cable long enough to temp run roughly inside the house and boom I’m back to full speed!

    Thanks for all the input
     
  10. gremlin16

    gremlin16

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    1,674
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    Yes
    BT line adapters here and they work a treat.
     
    Mikesphotaes likes this.
  11. tijuana taxi

    tijuana taxi

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    9,651
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    Rich
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    Have you tried the new'ish BT Smart Hub, seems to give a good wi-fi performance throughout the house

    I used to need BT Powerline adapters with my old hub, think it was a 3, but the new hub meant they were no longer required.
     
  12. bbg404

    bbg404

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    1,261
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    Ben
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    Interesting ..... might give BT a call see if i can get a deal on one.
     
  13. gremlin16

    gremlin16

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    1,674
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    Yes
  14. neil_g

    neil_g

    Messages:
    31,086
    Name:
    Neil
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    No
    Careful if you use a vpn for work etc. They seem horribly unreliable at getting a connection going.
     
  15. andy1868

    andy1868

    Messages:
    1,224
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    Andy
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    Yes
    From experience, I would just go down the cat 5 route if it isn’t too difficult/costly. If it’s external be sure to use external grade, if done properly it’ll probably give decades of reliable service. If you want to future proof yourself a little more Cat 6 may be a better idea but you probably won’t notice any difference at the moment. Powerline adapters are great when they work but in my experience they get tired and need replacing, network cards tend to last the age of the PC as does WiFi but then that can pose other problems.

    I’ve spent 11 years in IT/network support and couldn’t count how many power line adapters that I’ve seen go bad, yet I don’t remember replacing a single cat 5 cable itself that hasn’t been damaged by external factors. Sure, sometimes the ends go knackered with wear and tear but they’re a quick and cheap fix.
     
    Eloise likes this.
  16. onomatopoeia

    onomatopoeia

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    4,128
    Name:
    Mark
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    Yes
    Cat5e will do gigabit at the lengths used in a domestic setup, even the cheap CCA stuff can sustain it, so the extra faff involved in installing cat6 to get 10G is rarely required.

    Powerline is a dreadful bodge, unreliable (the adapters break a lot - three weeks was the record for us) and slow, because twin and earth carrying a noisy 240V signal is never going to be the best physical layer for network data.
     
    andy1868 likes this.
  17. bbg404

    bbg404

    Messages:
    1,261
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    Ben
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    Yeah I think I’ll go for the cable install after all I want the main pc running as fast as possible physically and internet wise so the best connection for uploading and downloading and website updates is essential
     
    andy1868 likes this.
  18. Eloise

    Eloise

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    1,553
    Name:
    Eloise
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    Yes
    Cat5e is rated to do even 10GbE up to 45m.

    Its probably worth (if you can manage it) putting wall plates at either end, that gives a fixed point and then use a patch cable. Gives the more reliable connections and stronger physically - any wear will be on a £5 patch cable.

    Also given the relative work involved, you might want to run 2 cables at the same time.
     
  19. Byker28i

    Byker28i

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    21,148
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    Yes
    Yup as I said earlier, it's also so much easier to terminate external grade cable in wall plates as they just punch in.
     
    Eloise likes this.
  20. B1ts

    B1ts

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    1,891
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    No
    As per Neil and others cable is still the way to go whenever possible imho.
     

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