Camera straps

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15
Name
Charles
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#1
After great advice on here I'm taking my Nikon D7500 and 16-85 lens on a trip to India later this year and in the interests of comfort, convenience and security want to get a strap that will meet those needs. I've looked at many YouTube reviews but would be grateful for any suggestions that members here might have.
 
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395
Name
Mike
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#2
I personally find a simple hand strap (like used on video cameras) to be best.
It keeps the camera readily to hand & secure, yet allows me to put it back in the bag quickly too...
 
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3,452
Name
Ian
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#3
I personally find a simple hand strap (like used on video cameras) to be best.
It keeps the camera readily to hand & secure, yet allows me to put it back in the bag quickly too...
This. Peak Design Cuff or Clutch would do the trick.
 
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#4
I use the black rapid sport type (sling/slide)

Find it really comfortable and leaves both hands free but keeps camera readily available, I use it with d500-70-200 for football and move around a lot.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#5
I use THESE on my SLRs and a couple of my CSCs. Spread the weight on my neck or shoulder to reduce the apparent weight.
 
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#6
I personally find a simple hand strap (like used on video cameras) to be best.
It keeps the camera readily to hand & secure, yet allows me to put it back in the bag quickly too...
I got a nice one from here https://gordyscamerastraps.com/ - very strong but a bit pricey.
If you have it properly over your wrist you can't drop it or suffer an opportunist grab and run.
 
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Bazza
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#7
I recently bought a Peak design Slide strap. I had the exactly the same concerns as you, but against getting the hand strap cuff/clutch which I also considered but thinking of the weight of say even a 24-70mm lens on the hand all day put me off. Since having the slide strap I was amazed the difference in comfort it had against the Nikon one that comes with the camera.

Don't get me wrong the Clutch is still in my thoughts for using in the street and even may still get that as well when using say a 50mm lens(not so heavy)
 
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2,003
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#8
I use THESE on my SLRs and a couple of my CSCs. Spread the weight on my neck or shoulder to reduce the apparent weight.
I've been using these Op/Tech Pro straps since my main camera was an F100. They do the job well, are well priced, and secure (but easy to detach when you need to). I don't like using a hand strap with anything too big to slip into a jacket pocket.
 
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2,877
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Richard
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#11
I use a Joby Pro Sling strap. It's an across the body style strap so takes all the weight off your neck and leaves both hands free. I use it to carry an EOS 80D and a Sigma 120-400mm lens and it's comfortable all day. Similar style to a Black Rapid strap but much cheaper
 
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13,499
Name
Keith
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#12
I use the black rapid sport type (sling/slide)

Find it really comfortable and leaves both hands free but keeps camera readily available, I use it with d500-70-200 for football and move around a lot.
I used one of these for years, great strap, though I imagine much cheaper rip offs of it are just as good. I haven't used any strap in a long while now.
 
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#13
I used one of these for years, great strap, though I imagine much cheaper rip offs of it are just as good. I haven't used any strap in a long while now.
Yeah I did toy with the “unbranded” version but you can pick them up nearly new for about £20/£25 original, i would love to know if the £12 copy is any good
 
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Keith
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#14
Yeah I did toy with the “unbranded” version but you can pick them up nearly new for about £20/£25 original, i would love to know if the £12 copy is any good
Are they that cheap now? When I bought mine it was closer to £80!
 
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#16
Are they that cheap now? When I bought mine it was closer to £80!
Second hand, i got mine for £24 i think from the bay, virtually unused
 
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371
Name
Keith
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#17
I have used Optech straps and accessories for years.
 
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212
Name
Tony
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#18
I use the grip system, I have a mount on the bottom of each camera with hand strap, belt holder, across body strap and a plate on tripod and monopod. With the hand strap I can still belt mount it or put it on the cross body strap, saving having to change setups for different situations.

I won a FB comp from this company, that is how I got to know about bgrip (maybe would not have tried it otherwise).
https://www.cameraclean.co.uk/products.php?cat=b-grip+camera+support+systems

Have since added to it and will keep using the system for as long as I have a camera!

T
 
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8,486
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wayne clarke
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#19
Can I just add a small word of caution here. Many camera tripod screws are not drilled into the camera body (as you might expect) they are in fact a small plate attached to the camera by three tiny grub screws. Personally I wouldn't risk hanging the camera and lens off that.
On a tripod a camera has gravity and static load working for it, hanging upside down while we scrable about it's putting the whole static and dynamic loading on the mount. Thats part of the reason most long heavy lens have a mount of their own.
 
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212
Name
Tony
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#21
Can I just add a small word of caution here. Many camera tripod screws are not drilled into the camera body (as you might expect) they are in fact a small plate attached to the camera by three tiny grub screws. Personally I wouldn't risk hanging the camera and lens off that.
On a tripod a camera has gravity and static load working for it, hanging upside down while we scrable about it's putting the whole static and dynamic loading on the mount. Thats part of the reason most long heavy lens have a mount of their own.
I had never even thought of that, I assumed the tripod thread would be fixed to a frame on the other side!

Does anybody have info on how these are fixed (specifically canon)?
 
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395
Name
Mike
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#22
I had never even thought of that, I assumed the tripod thread would be fixed to a frame on the other side!

Does anybody have info on how these are fixed (specifically canon)?
The only cameras I've taken apart to that level (A Pentax SLR & several compacts), did indeed have the tripod port added as a separate part with tiny fixing screws, BUT it was on the inside of the baseplate. Screwing a mount onto the hole basically clamped it in place and the tiny machine screws just stop the block from rotating.

If it failed it would involve pulling the block through the baseplate, requiring somewhat more force than just stripping the threads would need.
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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33,187
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#23
I took a Nikon 1 series (IIRC) to pieces and it was as Mike describes above. The camera involved had a metal chassis and the tripod socket was seated in a cast recess on the inside of the chassis.
 
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6,492
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Graham
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#25
I took a Nikon 1 series (IIRC) to pieces and it was as Mike describes above. The camera involved had a metal chassis and the tripod socket was seated in a cast recess on the inside of the chassis.
Exactly. It's designed to fail safe. I've never seen it any different on any serious camera. Same is true for the strap lugs at the top from what I've seen.
 
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4,811
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Dave
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#26
I'm a great fan of the FREE ones you get with every camera !!!

I did once buy a nice/comfy one and it came apart within a couple of years, thankfully not dropping the camera, whereas the FREE Nikon (in my case) ones I have are still in great condition 3+ years on

I honestly don't know why anyone bothers with anything else

Dave
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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33,187
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#27
Comfort!
 
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6,492
Name
Graham
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#30
I'm a great fan of the FREE ones you get with every camera !!!

I did once buy a nice/comfy one and it came apart within a couple of years, thankfully not dropping the camera, whereas the FREE Nikon (in my case) ones I have are still in great condition 3+ years on

I honestly don't know why anyone bothers with anything else

Dave
I don't find the standard ones that comfortable but the main reason I don't use them is that I don't want a strap fitted when I'm using the camera on a tripod. Standard straps are a pain to fit and remove. BR straps or Peak straps can be removed in seconds.
 
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2,877
Name
Richard
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#31
I'm a great fan of the FREE ones you get with every camera !!!

I did once buy a nice/comfy one and it came apart within a couple of years, thankfully not dropping the camera, whereas the FREE Nikon (in my case) ones I have are still in great condition 3+ years on

I honestly don't know why anyone bothers with anything else

Dave

Comfort. I can honestly say my camera strap was the best photography related thing I bought last year, by far. Carrying a 400mm lens around my neck for 12 hours while I walk 10-12 miles around a race track was not fun. Now the camera is across my body I don't have any neck pain at the end of the day.
 
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730
Name
Col
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#32
I'm a great fan of the FREE ones you get with every camera !!!

I did once buy a nice/comfy one and it came apart within a couple of years, thankfully not dropping the camera, whereas the FREE Nikon (in my case) ones I have are still in great condition 3+ years on

I honestly don't know why anyone bothers with anything else

Dave
Health issues in my case! I have a spinal condition that affects my sacral spine and neck/shoulders and tend to find that the ones supplied with cameras don't work for me, i got a BR sport for my 30th a few years ago and it has been a god send really because it takes the load off my neck (shoulders tend to cope a lot better with it) and spreads it a lot more evenly. Only slight ball ache is when using it in conjunction with a rucksack, it will sit under the shoulder strap but it does lead to fiddling with it a lot more regularly to get it to sit right again.

I do take your point about some third party straps not lasting though, i have seen a few instances of various ones falling to bits/the connectors being a weak point etc which the free ones that come with cameras don't seem to struggle with
 
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1,416
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#33
I'm a great fan of the FREE ones you get with every camera !!!

I did once buy a nice/comfy one and it came apart within a couple of years, thankfully not dropping the camera, whereas the FREE Nikon (in my case) ones I have are still in great condition 3+ years on

I honestly don't know why anyone bothers with anything else

Dave
i have to agree with others, i thought it wouldn't make much difference, but having that hanging around your neck, it's just awkward, didn't realise how much till I picked up a sling type and the camera with 70-200 or 200-500 just hangs nicely by my side.

so comfort by a long way.
 
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4,775
Name
Dave
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#34
Hanging a heavy camera round your neck only results in neck ache. Hang it from a shoulder or put the strap across your body if the lens is a reet biggun.

When I used supplied straps I fitted them 'inside out' so the grippy side was uppermost on my shoulder and the strap would slide across my body, but that made them slide off my shoulder. When I switched to old school straps (with added swivels to stop tangles from twisting) I found they stay on my shoulders and, surprisingly, don't cut into my shoulder even after six or more hours with a 70-200 on the camera. Better still they don't have logos on them. (y)

But as always, each to their own. :)
 
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212
Name
Tony
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#35
I asked Canon UK, they did not know but referred it to canon EU! This is the response...

"Thank you for your query regarding the use of the tripod bush for the connection of a strap.
As you are aware, each camera comes with a strap that tend to attach to the lugs on the sides of the camera body. The lugs and straps are the recommended means of using a strap on the camera and is the best way of attaching a strap.
The tripod bush is designed purely to allow the attachment of a tripod / monopod and there are no specifications as to how much load they can safely take. This means if you wish to use a third-party strap that uses the tripod mount, you have to do so at your own risk.
I am sorry that I am not able to be of any more assistance in this query."


I am sure it will be fine, going to add an extra tether just in case! I would have thought that cameras would have been tested for this as the bottom fixing straps are more common in the market nowadays!

T
 
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958
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#36
After great advice on here I'm taking my Nikon D7500 and 16-85 lens on a trip to India later this year and in the interests of comfort, convenience and security want to get a strap that will meet those needs. I've looked at many YouTube reviews but would be grateful for any suggestions that members here might have.
Security is more important than comfort.

You may want a boring plain strap with no manufacturer's name on it. I would not want a camera strap that screams Nikon or Canon thus adverting to thieves that I got a top brand camera.

You may want to consider hanging your camera from the oppose shoulder, ie: if your camera is on your right side, you want the strap to go around your neck and rest on the left shoulder (Similar to women sometimes would carry their handbag with the strap across the chest). If your camera was hanging from the same shoulder, it is a lot easier for a thief to grab it off and run off. But if strap was around your neck and resting on oppose shoulder, it delays the thief.

I would rather have to put up with the discomfort and difficulty, and get used to it, than to believe there had to be a more comfortable and convenience strap somewhere on the market.
 
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1,391
Name
Lee
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#37
I would rather have to put up with the discomfort and difficulty, and get used to it, than to believe there had to be a more comfortable and convenience strap somewhere on the market.
That what my Qstrap does, it goes across your chest and the attachment is a loop so can slide up or down as needed.

I do wonder about the other comments though about the mounting plate. Maybe it's worth an extra teather.
 
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#38
Can I just add a small word of caution here. Many camera tripod screws are not drilled into the camera body (as you might expect) they are in fact a small plate attached to the camera by three tiny grub screws. Personally I wouldn't risk hanging the camera and lens off that.
On a tripod a camera has gravity and static load working for it, hanging upside down while we scrable about it's putting the whole static and dynamic loading on the mount. Thats part of the reason most long heavy lens have a mount of their own.
I sometimes worry about the camera being too heavy for one of those sling straps, not because of what you said as I did not know that, but mainly because I would rather prefer to assume there could be something wrong with the idea. After all, the tripod hole at the bottom of the camera was designed for tripods not for sling straps. That being said, considering I do have a sling strap, I prefer to mostly cup my hand under the camera and give it a little bit of a lift, to use my arm as a support for the sling strap, let the camera spend a bit of time being carried by my arm in addition to being carried by a sling strap. I mostly let go of it when I needed both hands, like to open a bottle of water, to open a sandwich wrapping, to write notes, or whatever, then mostly go back to holding my camera when walking around.

Does it help? Does giving the camera a bit of a support from my free hand help ease off the pressure on the tripod mount? Aside from this, I do find it help ease off the pressure the strap is on my neck. :)

I have noticed a few photographers let their cameras hang totally by the sling strap while they walk around with their hands in their pockets.
 
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8,486
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wayne clarke
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#39
I sometimes worry about the camera being too heavy for one of those sling straps, not because of what you said as I did not know that, but mainly because I would rather prefer to assume there could be something wrong with the idea. After all, the tripod hole at the bottom of the camera was designed for tripods not for sling straps. That being said, considering I do have a sling strap, I prefer to mostly cup my hand under the camera and give it a little bit of a lift, to use my arm as a support for the sling strap, let the camera spend a bit of time being carried by my arm in addition to being carried by a sling strap. I mostly let go of it when I needed both hands, like to open a bottle of water, to open a sandwich wrapping, to write notes, or whatever, then mostly go back to holding my camera when walking around.

Does it help? Does giving the camera a bit of a support from my free hand help ease off the pressure on the tripod mount? Aside from this, I do find it help ease off the pressure the strap is on my neck. :)

I have noticed a few photographers let their cameras hang totally by the sling strap while they walk around with their hands in their pockets.
I'm no expert but I would assume the less load the better. That said a mate happily dangles a brace of Canon 7ds with lenses off one of those shoulder holster strap thingies he got off ebay, he hasn't had any issues I know of, and lots of people use them so maybe I'm just over cautious. I have seen a few cameras with the tripod screws ripped out though, mostly when a tripod has taken a dive.
 
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#40
In my film shooting decades I never used straps using multiple bodies. In the digital era I went through an assortment of OP/TECH and then Peak Design straps. Having never received the replacement Peak Design Anchors, all mine are V3, I gave up and went back to basics. I have a loop of paracord through the eyelets on the bodies and quick release plates. That way I can attach any strap with snap hooks to any of the loops.
 
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