Campervan - The new "must have" piece of equipment ?

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Steve
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#81
And the money you save will pay for a fair few nights in a hotel...
Agree - particularly the further south in Europe you go hotels can be REALLY cheap. I was paying £33 to stay in a hotel in the Spanish Pyrenees. Why subject yourself to driving a £40k van, or even worse - sleeping in a tent when you can do that. Photographer friendly too, could leave early for sunrises from the Anral Hotel in Escalona and arrive in late if shooting late in the evening. Pictures will follow in the fullness of time ;)

The UK is such a small area that if you are doing Glencoe over 2 days 1 night in a hotel and one in a car is fine. I sleep out between sunsets and sunrises in the car over the summer, its cheaper than driving home and back and pretty comfy if you take a douvet.
 
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#82
You don't need to spend mega money for a usable van. My T4 was £550 about 5 years ago & i've not put a whole lot of money into it.
i've been away in it most weekends since about April & there's just something magical about waking up to the sound of the sea :woot:

they do seem to be becoming a bit of a fashion accessory now which is pushing prices up. TBH i'm wanting something bigger now, the older we get the more comfort we crave..
i have an Iveco Daily that i was going to fit out but as we've had such a great summer it's just sat in the road unused. i think i'm going to go down the "buy a camper thats ready to go" route. :whistle:

i like the freedom a campervan/motorhome gives you. allows spontaneity. i'm also thinking i'll jst keep my T4 as it goes under a 2m barrier & fits in a parking space :thinking:

decisions decisions :thinking:



 
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#83
You don't need to spend mega money for a usable van. My T4 was £550 about 5 years ago & i've not put a whole lot of money into it.
i've been away in it most weekends since about April & there's just something magical about waking up to the sound of the sea :woot:

they do seem to be becoming a bit of a fashion accessory now which is pushing prices up. TBH i'm wanting something bigger now, the older we get the more comfort we crave..
i have an Iveco Daily that i was going to fit out but as we've had such a great summer it's just sat in the road unused. i think i'm going to go down the "buy a camper thats ready to go" route. :whistle:

i like the freedom a campervan/motorhome gives you. allows spontaneity. i'm also thinking i'll jst keep my T4 as it goes under a 2m barrier & fits in a parking space :thinking:

decisions decisions :thinking:



Im glad your pleased with it - my point was really a car does exactly the same thing and a large luxury car/SUV gives you more comfort etc with plenty of room to spend the night in.
 
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#86
i had an Audi S8, i now own a beater of a T4.
i've slept in both. I know which one i'd rather spend a weekend away in ;)
S8...drool. I am to be fair a light sleeper and don't sleep that well in a bed, sleeping in a car is fine for me, particularly over the summer months. Charging can be done in car, worst case for me, and cooking - portable stoves and washing pots in a tiny sink isn't my idea of fun.

I am glad they exist for those who like them but they are just not me (I am a car person) and reckon a big barge for my needs is a perfectly good way to go.

Indeed, no way I would want to use a car for sleeping in, been there done that, no car has seats that fold flat AND are as flat as an actual mattress quite honestly and the whole point is about using a camper vehicle and be self sufficient even if only for a day or two, ie be able to cook clean charge sleep etc etc.
Estate car or a big SUV and throw an airbed in the back, it's not bad actually. The self sufficincy thing - not my bag mind. A Landcruiser could make an excellent convert vehicle as opposed to a van. The V8 one would be terrific :D
 
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#87
Ah now we're throwing an airbed in? That's a different thing than just buying a lump of a car when its a better solution to buy a cheap van / car and convert it. Ive mentioned before about a berlingo, they're cheap, plentiful, quite reliable, a conversion is a home diy job and easy and it's all still insured as a car. That's my plan.
 
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#88
Ah now we're throwing an airbed in? That's a different thing than just buying a lump of a car when its a better solution to buy a cheap van / car and convert it. Ive mentioned before about a berlingo, they're cheap, plentiful, quite reliable, a conversion is a home diy job and easy and it's all still insured as a car. That's my plan.
I’ve done the air bed thing. The problem is they deflate and a car with a big comfy seat just works so well for me. That Lexus would do a lot of folk on here I reckon.

A Berlingo to be fair is great if you’re doing overnights that aren’t that far from home and not a lot of driving but for long journeys it cannot compete with a luxury car for refinement and comfort. I’d be fine doing overnights in a Berlingo doing Glasgow to Glencoe a lot but I wouldn’t want to drive it to Spain etc. That’s where the big fancy motors win, you can still sleep in the back, travel great distance in great comfort and use it as your only car.
 
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#90
Here’s a plusher alternative to a campervans. Ok you can’t cook in it but the rear recliner ottoman seat is just as good. Rear blinds too.

Proper engine too.

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201809130467887

And an economical version as a hybrid.

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201805136470782

For half the price of a new van you can get this, a ton of petrol to go places and some new gear.

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201809301013721

These things just go on and on without going wrong. Nothing Ford or VW made is as dependable as a Toyota or Lexus.

Plenty of room to sleep in, equipment etc concealed and hidden in a locked boot plus inbuilt satnav to help you find your way. Massive comfortable seats you can heat after a mornings cold shoot or cool you after a sweaty hike and they’ll keep you much more comfortable than the seats from a transverse mount engined van. Genuine refinement makes it a perfect companion to whisk you from the UK to the Alps.

This is a remarkably photographer friendly car and I should know. I drive it’s baby brother the GS.
Ghastly. All of them..........
 
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#92
You don't need to spend mega money for a usable van. My T4 was £550 about 5 years ago & i've not put a whole lot of money into it.
i've been away in it most weekends since about April & there's just something magical about waking up to the sound of the sea :woot:

they do seem to be becoming a bit of a fashion accessory now which is pushing prices up. TBH i'm wanting something bigger now, the older we get the more comfort we crave..
i have an Iveco Daily that i was going to fit out but as we've had such a great summer it's just sat in the road unused. i think i'm going to go down the "buy a camper thats ready to go" route. :whistle:

i like the freedom a campervan/motorhome gives you. allows spontaneity. i'm also thinking i'll jst keep my T4 as it goes under a 2m barrier & fits in a parking space :thinking:

decisions decisions :thinking:




In case you're wondering a T5 conversion goes under a 2m height barrier as well, and a T6 also would. Another point to consider is that the length of a SWB T5 or T6 is just less than 5m and it is therefore classed as a car on Calmac ferries to the Hebrides, and possibly elsewhere as well.
 
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#93
These are fantastic cars. A diesel van or a v8 saloon with big comfy heated and cooled seats.

The latter wins for me.

Silver wouldn’t be my first choice of paint but that butterscotch interior of the first. Droooool

To be honest there are no smilies to express my dislike of cars like that....
 
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Roger
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#94
To be honest there are no smilies to express my dislike of cars like that....
Luckily no one will ever make you drive one.

Isn't it great that we all get to choose the type of vehicle that suits our budget and requirements.
 

Nod

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#95
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#96
I'd go for a real motorhome and all the extra comforts they offer over a camper.
As I sit here typing this in my "real motorhome" watching Ramsey's Hotel Hell, being nice and warm and toasty, well fed, and in the knowledge that I can go for my end of evening pee without going outside following a few more glasses of wine, I am glad I am not in some rubbish hotel or a freezing car. I have owned a small camper and it was fine other than the fact that pegging down a drive away awning on longer summer trips was no better than having a car and a tent. Erecting an awning or tent was never a problem, the problem was pegging it down on parched ground.

In terms of cost, the initial outlay is substantial, but after the first year depreciation is low, and taking into account what you would otherwise pay for hotels and self-catering apartments, the costs even out. Your £40k could be paying for your next 10 years holidays, especially if you are away for months at a time like I am.

I would agree, though, that if you need to cover a lot of ground quickly, a luxury motor is better, but if you are not in a hurry, less so.
 
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#97
Go-Pod? https://www.go-pods.co.uk/

Quite a few of these micro-caravans about with that hook-up-and-go appeal. Double bed, cooker, sink, fridge, microwave, TV, heater, portaloo https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=17&v=mbnWFFcLTGY
Can you wash your mouth out with soap. Campervans are one thing, Steve’s love of 8-10 year old big luxury cars for kipping in the back of are another. Both acceptable in the context of a weekend mobile tog depending how far you travel. The suggestion that a caravan is acceptable to be discussed in polite company drags this thread to unacceptable lows.
 
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#99
Does silver do reflections better?
Depends how well you buff it. A decent polish and it will a bit but my preference is for a metallic white car.

I do a lot of travel in the summer (as that’s my favourite time of year) and a dark paint absorbs more heat etc etc. White keeps the cabin nice and cool.

With a decent wax it will reflect and pick up colours nicely.

And I agree. Caravans are the pits.

IMG_2869.JPG

Ps. This car is so comfortable to sleep in I nearly missed a sunrise and woke 5mins before it. Two nights in a row is no problem in this.
 
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Personally I would not want to sleep in a car due to lack of privacy and a sense of vulnerability due to that lack, especially if travelling alone. At least with a camper/motorhome you can draw blinds or move about in the vehicle.

I think the lack of a loo is more problematic for women too, if not on a camp site. We cant really just squat on the side of a layby in the middle of the night.
 
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Depends how well you buff it. A decent polish and it will a bit but my preference is for a metallic white car.

I do a lot of travel in the summer (as that’s my favourite time of year) and a dark paint absorbs more heat etc etc. White keeps the cabin nice and cool.

With a decent wax it will reflect and pick up colours nicely.

And I agree. Caravans are the pits.

View attachment 136459

Ps. This car is so comfortable to sleep in I nearly missed a sunrise and woke 5mins before it. Two nights in a row is no problem in this.
You’ve not deserted Mercedes have you Steve?
 
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Very interesting, I wonder what the costs were though.
I would guess a lot cheaper than a factory standard camper and with things put where you want them.

I think she lives more to the north of the UK and I think she said she went all the way to Dorset to buy the van before taking it to a converter.
To make that much effort possibly implies its an economic way to go about gaining a camper, plus of course its the size of a normal car for parking etc.

Somewhere on one of the recent videos she said she wanted a van as it felt safer than camping. I think women can be put off of landscape work as its often a style of photography done alone with lots of wandering about in isolated places. I can quite see why the physical security of a van is some part of its appeal and could help make the cost of a camper very good value, aside from the general convenience of one that anyone could appreciate.

Sadly, there are places I feel cautious about going to alone, as a woman photographer. I think its why there are less women landscape photographers, some places feel less accessible to us on personal safety grounds.

I bought a tent around 10 years ago and at least 3 blokes I know advised me it would be highly unsafe for me to camp alone, even in family camp grounds as they thought I would risk being attacked 'in just a tent' so its not just women being paranoid.

Plus of course a camper is much warmer (a massive plus), I was very impressed with the heater she had installed.
 
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That’s a very interesting point about safety. I certainly feel more safe in a car as opposed to a tent. I was attacked by a fox when I was in a tent. Having seen the film “deliverance” I knew to sleep with something blunt and heavy which certainly dealt with the Fox. That was in the Pyrenees though.

I doubt a woman alone in a place like Glencoe or Skye has anything to fear. Outdoorsy sorts tend to be helpful and law abiding. The worst you encounter is a dog walker (I have more fear about encountering someone with a dog going out than I do someone with a knife/gun/bat/bomb) when I’m in the Scottish highlands and Mountains in France or Spain. But I really do not like dogs.

You’ll be fine visiting here on your own, don’t give it a moments more thought and enjoy the autumn and places you want to go
 
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One of the things to be wary of when buying a camper from a converter is that typically the warranty for the base vehicle comes from the vehicle manufacturer, whilst the conversion warranty is from the converter. Lots of potential to say “it’s their fault not mine.”
 
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I doubt a woman alone in a place like Glencoe or Skye has anything to fear
Statistically you are right, but its about anxiety. It actually mostly men who seem to say women should feel afraid of being alone in places. Its meant well most of the time, but reinforces that even men think other men are a significant risk. Its nice you are taking a more positive position.

My family tend to be a bit wary as my Aunt was murdered (before I was born). It was actually her husband who killed her (statistically more likely than any stranger) but it makes threats seem that much more real, not so 'theoretical' as when seen on the news. She was only 26.

My father was so obsessed with safety (control?), its hard to go any isolated place without hearing him say in my head that women put themselves at risk by doing such things. If its been drummed into you since you were a kid, its hard to dump it, even if you know the odds are actually on your side. It will be even worse for kids of both sexes now and onwards as none of them are allowed out at all, cant even risk a photograph. I wonder if parents contemplate how much damage they are doing on some levels by keeping kids 'safe'?
 
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One of the things to be wary of when buying a camper from a converter is that typically the warranty for the base vehicle comes from the vehicle manufacturer, whilst the conversion warranty is from the converter. Lots of potential to say “it’s their fault not mine.”
Insurance is an issue too and I wish she had discussed that. Thomas Heaton said on his video that he had appaling problems trying to get his van insured at all, after it was converted. The risks are so high, insurers don't want to cover them.

I would love to know what sort of premiums people pay for conversions and indeed for campervans in general. How the premiums compare between the 2 types.
 
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Insurance is an issue too and I wish she had discussed that. Thomas Heaton said on his video that he had appaling problems trying to get his van insured at all, after it was converted. The risks are so high, insurers don't want to cover them.

I would love to know what sort of premiums people pay for conversions and indeed for campervans in general. How the premiums compare between the 2 types.
There are many insurers who specificially do this. Obviously it will also depend on the individual, what van they have etc.
 
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Statistically you are right, but its about anxiety. It actually mostly men who seem to say women should feel afraid of being alone in places. Its meant well most of the time, but reinforces that even men think other men are a significant risk. Its nice you are taking a more positive position.

My family tend to be a bit wary as my Aunt was murdered (before I was born). It was actually her husband who killed her (statistically more likely than any stranger) but it makes threats seem that much more real, not so 'theoretical' as when seen on the news. She was only 26.

My father was so obsessed with safety (control?), its hard to go any isolated place without hearing him say in my head that women put themselves at risk by doing such things. If its been drummed into you since you were a kid, its hard to dump it, even if you know the odds are actually on your side. It will be even worse for kids of both sexes now and onwards as none of them are allowed out at all, cant even risk a photograph. I wonder if parents contemplate how much damage they are doing on some levels by keeping kids 'safe'?
Anxiety is a different thing and a difficult thing to overcome. I know for instance most dogs won’t jump up and bite my throat out but I still cross the road whenever I see someone with one. I really don’t like them, I’m very apprehensive around dogs and I do not like coming into contact or being in close proximity with them - despite owners saying to me - it’s ok he won’t hurt you it doesn’t help.

So, I do get where you are coming from but please don’t worry I really doubt you’d come to harms way up here. Urban areas are more dicey it has to be said but rural areas here are very safe and you’d enjoy it I think
 

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Ive mentioned before about a berlingo,
I drive one for work, about 250 miles a day, I find it more than adequate, and plenty comfortable, for my large 6 foot frame, I think it would make a nice conversion TBH :)

Photographer Lynne Luxon-Jones
She's a damned fine photographer & member here under the name of Blondie606 (y)
 
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Re Insurance:

I was worried about insurance for mine for quite a few years. My Romahome had been insured by Co-op and before I upgraded to a T5 conversion I asked them if they would be prepared to insure the new one, to which the answer was "yes". A few months later, the answer had become "no". They no longer did business insurance for camper vans. But eventually they relented, putting me on an old policy which still included that cover.

I think you would get the same response from most standard vehicle insurance companies now - No, we don't do business insurance on camper vans.

However there is a whole range of specialist companies who do, including business cover, and cover for conversions as they develop. This year I got mine cheaper than the Co-op was offering. If anyone needs more info, I can search out the relevant magazine article. They did have a "best buy".
 
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Anxiety is a different thing and a difficult thing to overcome. I know for instance most dogs won’t jump up and bite my throat out but I still cross the road whenever I see someone with one. I really don’t like them, I’m very apprehensive around dogs and I do not like coming into contact or being in close proximity with them - despite owners saying to me - it’s ok he won’t hurt you it doesn’t help.

So, I do get where you are coming from but please don’t worry I really doubt you’d come to harms way up here. Urban areas are more dicey it has to be said but rural areas here are very safe and you’d enjoy it I think
I would never consider camping "wild" in an urban area, and from my experience it can be dodgy in the outskirts of towns and cities.. They tend to be the places where urban yobboes pinch a car, drive out to the countryside and torch it; and similarly I've had some frightening experiences near towns when boyos drive out after pub closing time to smoke dope, listen to loud music, do wheelies and try to impress their girlfriends. And don't mention doggers.......
 
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Oh go on then........

Quite a few years ago, I arrived after dark at a nature reserve car park in south Wales. I thought it a bit odd that there were so many cars parked there but blotted it out of my mind, got on with cooking and preparing for sleep etc. Cars were coming and going. By about 10 pm I was getting really uneasy when I heard another car arrive, drive round, stop, drive round, etc, then park near my van. My anxiety levels were really peaking at that point. Car door opens, someone gets out, walks towards my van.....and suddenly someone slams their fist on my side window. I was terrified!

I can only imagine that it was a vigilante trying to clear the car park of doggers. Any way, I quickly threw a few clothes on, started the van up and just drove, for maybe an hour, till I was more relaxed and found another pull-in where I could spend the night.

Then there was the night in a car park near Malvern recently......just too much coming and going all night for it to have been anything else.

I've never partaken, guv, you understand......it's just a risk you have to be prepared to take.
 
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I would love to know what sort of premiums people pay for conversions and indeed for campervans in general. How the premiums compare between the 2 types.
370 quid per year including tax and European breakdown cover for a purpose built motorhome. Limited to 8000 miles. The converted Mazda Bongo was about the same (a while ago), once I learned to avoid mainstream insurers. Getting quotes wasn't a problem, they didn't care that it was a converted MPV, but they all wanted to start my NCD from scratch.
 
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