Can’t get on with my D850.Thinking of going back to D750

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Peter Francis
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#1
Need some advice.For a start I’m no pro by any means but I had a D750 and was ok with it.Because I was mainly into landscape and timelapses I bought a D850.Obviously the 4K and 8k timelapses together with the higher MP count was the biggest draw.
Unfortunately many of the images I’ve taken have been a little out of focus especially the ones using a zoom lens.I don’t particularly like taking a tripod everywhere with me.I have about 6 Nikon lenses so don’t really want to switch from Nikon.
I’ve learned the hard way that MP isn’t everything so my question is which Nikon should I go for next?
 
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droj
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#3
I’ve learned the hard way that MP isn’t everything so my question is which Nikon should I go for next?
You're obviously of the prevalent mindset that you can buy your way out of trouble. What about addressing the actual issue and finding out whether it's you or the camera that's at fault? Otherwise, what'll happen? What if it is the camera? Will you offload it and it's possible issue to a buyer w/o stating the handicap? Are ethics factored into your convenience?
 
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peter fran
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Peter Francis
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#4
Thanks for the replies.Don’t get me wrong I’ve taken some great photos with the D850 but I think it’s because of the higher resolution my mistakes show up more that’s all.I think I took the plunge a bit too early for this camera.I don’t really need the extra pixels if I’m being honest too and my pc is struggling a bit with the larger file size.I’m still learning and made a silly impulse buy
 
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Steve
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#5
Hi Peter, I recently moved from the D610 to the D800 and am having similar issues to some extent, although my hit rate is getting better the more I use the camera. One thing I learned quite early on is that handling technique is everything with these mega-pixel monsters - they demand respect and it takes time and thought to get the best out of them.

Have you used the auto-AF adjustment feature to make sure that the lens/body combination is truly in tune? I was getting really frustrated with the D800 until I checked and adjusted the setting for my lenses ... and it's not automatic on the D800! It made a big difference and probably stopped me going back to the D610 (or even D500).

Persevere, my friend, it is well worth it :)
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#6
Out of focus or suffering from slight camera shake? Might even be the super high MP of the 850 showing up any slight deficiencies in the lenses.
 
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Pete
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#7
Need some advice.For a start I’m no pro by any means but I had a D750 and was ok with it.Because I was mainly into landscape and timelapses I bought a D850.Obviously the 4K and 8k timelapses together with the higher MP count was the biggest draw.
Unfortunately many of the images I’ve taken have been a little out of focus especially the ones using a zoom lens.I don’t particularly like taking a tripod everywhere with me.I have about 6 Nikon lenses so don’t really want to switch from Nikon.
I’ve learned the hard way that MP isn’t everything so my question is which Nikon should I go for next?
What lenses are you using?
The D850 is amazing & demanding in equal measures..
 
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Steven
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#8
Here's the thing... your images are not likely to be any worse with the D850. It's just that often you're not getting the full benefit of the greater resolution for various reasons. I.e. if you take a slightly blurry image (camera shake) it is equally blurry on any FF sensor... it just looks worse on the D850 if you view it at the same pixel magnification (i.e. 100%, and larger on the monitor).
Even when you do not get the full benefit of the increased resolution you still get some benefit (increased sampling/data/accuracy). But it's up to you as to whether the larger file sizes are worth it. And sometimes you get even more of the potential benefits... that's why I use the D850.
 
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Alan
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#9
Thanks for the replies.Don’t get me wrong I’ve taken some great photos with the D850 but I think it’s because of the higher resolution my mistakes show up more that’s all.I think I took the plunge a bit too early for this camera.I don’t really need the extra pixels if I’m being honest too and my pc is struggling a bit with the larger file size.I’m still learning and made a silly impulse buy
The first time I remember reading things along this line was when the Canon 50D came out.

I think it's worth keeping in mind what the final picture is going to be used for and how it'll be viewed. If it's going to be viewed as a whole picture on screen or as a relatively large print the chances are that any slight misfocus or camera shake wont be visible to most people. However, if you're going to print very large prints and view them closely, crop like a mad thing and print large or view closely or pixel peep at high magnification you're going to have to take the picture using kit and technique that'll stand up to that sort of viewing.

Taking and viewing D850 pictures in the same way as you'd take and view D750 pictures should only give you the same or actually better results (because you're effectively down sizing D850 pictures which could help) unless there's something wrong like lenses needing MA to the body.
 
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wayne clarke
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#11
Theres a few possibles, one is an issue with the camera, the second is cameras like this show up the limit of lens very quickly, the last is that any slight movement blur you might not notice normally tends to show up more at these MP's
Have you tried the obvious tests of comparing the same shot hand held and tripod (same settings) or shooting higher shutter speeds, finally try borrowing a good lens and comparing.
I think as you start going up the resolution you need to modify they way you work a little to get the best out of a camera.
 
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Kell
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#13
Last time I spoke to a pro about his Nikon, he said some cameras and lenses need calibrating to each other.

He said sometimes hey work together perfectly, and sometimes they don't.

He had no trouble with his previous lens and camera, but when he bought a new body, it didn't play nicely with the old lens.

He sent it all back to Nikon and they sorted it for him. No problems since.

I can't give you any more info than that, as it was an off-hand conversation and not something I'd come across before as I don't really follow Nikon stuff.
 
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John
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#14
Hello. I'm a twin D850 shooter now. I use my old D750 as back up. Shot my wedding season with the pair.

For me, the key was calibrating the lenses to the body. I used Reikan Focal - https://www.reikanfocal.com/ Since I've calibrated my 35, 50 and 85mm primes, I rarely miss focus.

I've also got the Tamron 15-30 G2 wide angle and its tack sharp. My old Tamron 24-70 and 70-200 G1s (which I got with my D750), the images aren't bad at all but not at sharp as my primes but I haven't calibrated them.

Definitely have a go at calibrating first. I tend to shoot mostly manual and leave my shutter speed up (unless I'm deliberately slowing it down) and bump the ISO to compensate and then apply noise reduction later in post when light is poor.

I shot this in Dubai (linked from my personal FB page) from the £20k a night Presidential Suite at the Walfdorf Astoria.
Think this was about 7 or 8 images shot with the 50mm. Processed in Affinity Photo on iPad because the wife wouldn't let me take my laptop.



Granted that was created with a tripod but check out these... handheld, taken indoors with limited light.

 
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peter fran
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Peter Francis
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#15
Thanks all.I’ve decided to persevere with the D850.The lenses I have are 2 Nikon art primes.50mm and the 20mm.Tamron 150-600mm SP,Tamron 90mm macro 1:1 and a 10-20mm sigma hsm.
 
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Steve
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#19
Suggestions above to calibrate with your D850 are sound ... also think about your technique, if you don't like using a tripod would a monopod help, or a beanbag, or resting against/on something?
Also try using a shutter speed of 1/focal length or faster and I bet they are all fine unless the focus is out.

Long lens's demand the most shake free technique.
 
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Lloyd
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#21
You're in good company. I experience exactly the same when I first got my D850. I'm just about now getting some shots with it I am happy with. It's a hoofin' great megapixel camera that's unforgiving where lens quality and technique is concerned, but rewarding when it all clicks.

Here's a shot from last week taken in quite challenging conditions. I'm happy with the sharpness considering it's shooting wide open for that lens (the 24-85mm f4). I've got a Samyang 14mm f2.4 turning up tomorrow and so that should make a big difference!

_8504196
by LJR69, on Flickr
 
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