Canon EOS M Series Cameras

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Michael
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Yeah I definitely think the one I uploaded is a TS. On the spider above, how to distinguish between a Cross spider and your average Orb weaver [I tend to call all of this type of spider a weaver, they're everywhere right now too!] - before anyone says 'it'll look angrier' :D but seriously how to tell?
Yes, that one you posted is a Small Tortoiseshell. Garden cross spider is the most common orb web spider. Thankfully there is a great uk spider group on facebook full of experts for when I can't remember what they are called!

Here is a much smaller one, again m50 and sigma 105

Garden Cross Spider
by Michael Johnson, on Flickr

And this is a metallina sp

Metalina sp
by Michael Johnson, on Flickr
 
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12,968
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Keith
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Yes, that one you posted is a Small Tortoiseshell. Garden cross spider is the most common orb web spider. Thankfully there is a great uk spider group on facebook full of experts for when I can't remember what they are called!

Here is a much smaller one, again m50 and sigma 105

Garden Cross Spider
by Michael Johnson, on Flickr

And this is a metallina sp

Metalina sp
by Michael Johnson, on Flickr

Nice one, cheers. I'm seeing both of these and the larger ones I just call Orb weavers - some of them casting great webs around the bushes and it's fun to watch them stringing up prey on them - especially if it's a wasp!
 

Cobra

Mr. Floyd
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Dale.
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Hmmm, Canon are saying the M6II is a replacement for both the M6 and the M5.
Not impressed if that is correct as I hate bolt on EVFs.

Mind me asking where this was said please? I'm waiting on the M5Mk2 but if it's not coming, I'll just go for an M50. M6M2 looks impressive but it needs an EVF.
 

Cobra

Mr. Floyd
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Every now and again, you get lucky (y)
M50, Canon ring flash, Canon 100 macro lens.


051
by Cobra, on Flickr

I'm not sure why these guys are all over the viginia creeper berries, they aren't even ripe yet


039
by Cobra, on Flickr
 
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12,968
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Keith
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Every now and again, you get lucky (y)
M50, Canon ring flash, Canon 100 macro lens.


051
by Cobra, on Flickr

I'm not sure why these guys are all over the viginia creeper berries, they aren't even ripe yet


039
by Cobra, on Flickr
Nice, I got some bees in flight images down the river last week but none of them were sharp, SS at 1/500 was too slow even - didn't have the flash with me.

Wasps are all over everything atm, every time I open the back door I'm attacked by one of the little feckers, have to practice my Bruce Lee moves :D
 

Cobra

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have to practice my Bruce Lee moves :D
There's nothing like a wasp or spider web in your face to improve your Kung Fu moves 10 fold :D

SS at 1/500 was too slow even
M50 doesn't seem to sync above 200th I'd prefer 250th TBH but you can't have everything :D

Cheers Keith (y)
 
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Keith
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There's nothing like a wasp or spider web in your face to improve your Kung Fu moves 10 fold :D


M50 doesn't seem to sync above 200th I'd prefer 250th TBH but you can't have everything :D

Cheers Keith (y)
Using flash you don't need such high SS though, I meant without you do need it to try freeze the action/flight. To freeze a bee in flight it's probably more like 1/2000 so natural light better be real good. When shooting macro with off cam flash I'm often down to 1/80th - 1/125th to keep ISO low and get sharp images even of moving bugs - I think flash speed is something ridiculous like 1/10,000th so it over rides SS in most cases. You can get blurring if you go too low with something very fast moving of course, trial and error to see what works best for different subjects
 
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Cobra

Mr. Floyd
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When shooting macro with off cam flash I'm often down to 1/80th - 1/125th to keep ISO low and get sharp images even of moving bugs
TBH I always shoot at 200th with the flash ( either 580exII or the ring flash) I hadn't thought of dropping it by ( circa) half but I'll certainly give it a go now.
Thanks for the tip (y)
 

Cobra

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I found it interesting the way the spider had folded a leaf over the top of it, and "locked it" with a few web strands.


061
by Cobra, on Flickr

Just a random wasp.


054
by Cobra, on Flickr

As always M50 canon 100 mm 2.8 macro lens and this time 580exII flash.
1/200th f/11 200 iso
 
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I found it interesting the way the spider had folded a leaf over the top of it, and "locked it" with a few web strands.


061
by Cobra, on Flickr

Just a random wasp.


054
by Cobra, on Flickr

As always M50 canon 100 mm 2.8 macro lens and this time 580exII flash.
1/200th f/11 200 iso
Nice work, it's amazing watching them wrap up larger prey like this. I have one from a couple years back of a large orb weaver also wrapping up a still alive wasp, and another of one in the midst of wrapping a daddy long legs
 

Cobra

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Cheers Keith (y)

I have one from a couple years back of a large orb weaver also wrapping up a still alive wasp
I'd missed the action, by about an hour, that was quite a large orb weaver that I'd actually shot earlier.
Went back for a second look a little later, and there it was with lunch!
That'll teach me to go in for coffee mid shoot :D
 
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Cheers Keith (y)


I'd missed the action, by about an hour, that was quite a large orb weaver that I'd actually shot earlier.
Went back for a second look a little later, and there it was with lunch!
That'll teach me to go in for coffee mid shoot :D
It often happens me, butterflies usually the ones to troll me. I'll be in the garden snooping about for life for over an hour and nothing ... go inside for a cuppa, look out the kitchen window and find 2-3 butterflies doing a mating dance on one of the hedges, grab cam, leg it back out ... gone ... not a sign :D
 

Cobra

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Jumping spider?

It was easy enough getting down to its level, getting back up however, was a totally different matter :D

M50 Canon 100mm macro lens, 31mm extension tube and "fill flash"


023
by Cobra, on Flickr
 
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Jumping spider?

It was easy enough getting down to its level, getting back up however, was a totally different matter :D

M50 Canon 100mm macro lens, 31mm extension tube and "fill flash"


023
by Cobra, on Flickr
How to tell if it's a jumping spider when that close? : "I wonder is this one'a a jum .... ARGH! where'd he go!?!" :ROFLMAO:
 
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OK so its a "non jumping spider" then :D
I have no clue, but if it jumps down my top it'll be a squished spider very quickly :D It look like it could be a type of jumper, and I have seems similar ones leap - they tend to be on walls/pillars more so than in bushes - the ones I've come across at least. But I'll leave the ID to someone who might know better
 
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I have dozens of them, and that's where they usually are, on the garage wall.
This one ( and its mates) were hiding in the cracks of a block "edging"
They build their little cocoons around our front windows, particuarly the one across from the garage as the bins are also in that area. Little pounce traps - people often think they are nests for eggs but the spiders hide in them waiting to pounce on flies or moths that land nearby on the windows. If you check any windows near your garage I bet you'll see some, little tiny yellow balls right at the edge by the window frame, and if you poke one a spider may well come running out

I remembered we have one in our outside rubbish cupboard ... MP-E65mm again, guessing around 2.5x macro (uncropped)
I'm going to try for all the eyes looking directly at me tomorrow :eek:


Spider
by Mike.Pursey, on Flickr
That lens is insane, must be tricky to keep anything in focus!
 
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That lens is insane, must be tricky to keep anything in focus!
It's a lot easier to use on a mirrorless body than a DSLR as you get focus peaking plus you can magnify through the viewfinder.
I don't think I have used it more than a handful of times at 5x though as the subject has usually long gone by the time I have worked up to that magnification as it would just about be touching the critter.
 
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It's a lot easier to use on a mirrorless body than a DSLR as you get focus peaking plus you can magnify through the viewfinder.
I don't think I have used it more than a handful of times at 5x though as the subject has usually long gone by the time I have worked up to that magnification as it would just about be touching the critter.
I can get close to 3:1 with a Raynox 250 attached to a tele lens and shooting at 250mm [2.8:1], and it just gets insane, especially without a tripod [which I never use for macro] - even your own breathing can throw focus way off. Can only imagine 5x. I tend to use it more between 80-120mm, much easier to keep subjects in focus and frame them easier too. But, nice to have the options for really teensy things
 
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I have a Raynox 250 as well, it fits the MP-E but I have never bothered trying it. Besides, I found the Raynox works best on longer lenses (works very well on my 135mm f2/8). I never use a tripod either which is why the IBS in my Pentax gear is so useful as I also prefer natural light where possible.
 
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Yeah Raynox is best for lenses above 70mm in my experience, with 1:1 being around the 100mm mark [for the 250, it'll be longer for the 150 - you can also stack them] I've been using them years. Bought and sold at least 5 of them at this stage :D I'll not use it for a bit, sell it, a week later I'm searching for used ones again, guess I'll always have one. It's about the best macro attachment I've ever tried, and I've tried all sorts from reverse rings to macro tubes to cheaper glass attachments - I'd recommend anyone thinking on cheap macro filter sets to just skip and get a Raynox for sure. It doesn't affect IQ like shoddy no name cheap ones can, some even say the Raynox can improve IQ on some lenses [like cheap kit lenses, bit like the tele I use]

For lenses below 50mm you're best bet is macro rings, the sets that come with a 10mm and 16mm work pretty well, you can get sets for about £20 that maintain AF and aren't badly mad. Meike do a decent set, I've had those in the past, used to use them with a Fuji 35 1.4 lens and it worked really well.
 
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Cobra

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If you check any windows near your garage I bet you'll see some,
Its next doors garage, that boarders my property they may get upset if I start raking around their garden :D

little tiny yellow balls right at the edge by the window frame,
But yes I know what you mean (y)

Yeah Raynox is best for lenses above 70mm in my experience, with 1:1 being around the 100mm mark [for the 250, it'll be longer for the 150 -
I have a 250 raynox, I tried it on my 100mm and gave up :D
 
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Keith
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I have a 250 raynox, I tried it on my 100mm and gave up :D
You're sticking it onto an already 1:1 macro though, the Canon 100mm 2.8 L right? Using the Raynox calculator that tells me you are getting 2.6:1 magnification, and if you're not used to such extreme it is insanely difficult to nail shots at that.

Raynox calculator: http://extreme-macro.co.uk/raynox-adapter-techniques/
 

Cobra

Mr. Floyd
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Keith
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Indeed (y)


I noticed :D



Thanks I'll have a proper read in a bit (y)
To find the calculator just scroll down the page. All you need is to input the FL in mm, the closest focus distance of the lens and the magnification ratio - I use B&H all the time for this, they have full specs on most modern lenses at least.
 
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