Chinese tripods?

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Nightmare
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#42
Still not convinced, and won't unless I try one and really like it. Lately I've not used columns at all beyond base level, cut them down or disabled them completely for various reasons so I may have hard time with it as the sole means of getting setup.

I found an old Manfrotto 134B monopod that I bought used 10y ago and not used since. {the plan was to turn it into voice activated light stand :) } Leg locks have some minor scrapes exposing metal in a few places, but no MgO powder is visible. I'm not decided on testing it sea water and waiting for failure as it may take a little longer than I want.
For 30-40 I might just try that old 055 as design seems agreeable as long as I can cut down or eliminate that super long centre column.
 
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john
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#43
Are you saying the copies are more expensive than the originals?
You can't really call yourself a penny pincher if you can afford the spend £375 on one tripod, and you also have 3 others.
Think you're trying to kid yourself...:p
£375 is only about 2 weeks income, give or take, for something that will last longer than I will. Sounds like good value to me.
To be fair two of my other Gitzo tripods were bought when I was working and had a slightly higher income but greater expenses + I was putting one weeks earnings a month into savings. Don't forget my other interests such as R/C Aircraft, Archery + a LOT of Malt Whiskey, beer etc.

As to the prices compared to the copies? Well - Gitzo GT3320BS £189, GT2531 £200, GM2541 (monopod) £90, GT4542LS £375, used G1550T £140, used (now sold) G1329Mk2 + G1318 centre column £100. OOPS! Forgot my ex GT3530LS bought new at £300 - sold due to the GT4542LS. All bought from bricks and mortar camera shops or Gitzo UK except the G1550T which was E Bay.

As I said I can't afford the copies.
 
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Alan
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#44
I have a centre column bracket on my Benbo which reduces the drunken bagpipes effect. If anyone is considering a Benbo and is put off by the handling this additional little gizmo may help.
 
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wayne clarke
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#47
I've had a manfrotto tripod and monopod for at least 10 years, been in the sea and countless rivers, no problems at all.
Look at Benbo if you can find them, built like a tank. Failing that pick up a theodolite tripod. Solid as a rock, you just need to fit a plate for a tripod head (dead easy) I've got two I scrounged, but they are not mega expensive new. They dont fold up small though.
 
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#49
only about 2 weeks income, give or take, for something that will last longer than I will.
Cool, I also need a new Mac, new car, upgrade my ageing 5D3s (that's whole new system as EF-mount is soon to be pronounced dead) and did I mention a house? :)
 
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#50
[QUOTE="Just to clarify do you collect them or did 3 of them fail?[/QUOTE]

No I have different tripods for different uses. I wouldn't want to use my 4 series Systematic for travel, but I wouldn't want to use my 800 F5.6 L IS on my travel tripod! You get the picture:)
 
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#52
Cool, I also need a new Mac, new car, upgrade my ageing 5D3s (that's whole new system as EF-mount is soon to be pronounced dead) and did I mention a house? :)
I don't like Mac's, but each to their own. New car - Why? My car was bought at 18 months old with 11K miles on it at half the price of a new model + still had half of it's warranty remaining. EF dead? We will see, I was very underwhelmed by the EOS R. House? Well yes we all have to compromise here, I have to make do with a 4 bedroom semi-detached, but as I am currently single it is adequate.

Anyway this is getting silly. I was just suggesting that you scour the new/used market. If you want something "like" a Gitzo Systematic then get one! You may have to hunt around a bit but I have found them cheaper than the imitations.
 
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#53
If you are hard on tripods and are working to a budget then have you thought about looking on eBay for some old video camera tripods? I use these for work (for static 'locked off' night-vision video cameras outdoors) and, whilst they lack the finesse and light-weight of modern carbon fibre tripods, they seem quite sturdy and can be bought for around the £30 to £40 mark for a complete and mint-ish one in fully-working condition with mounting plate. Perhaps have a look at something like a used Velbon D700 and see if it might suit your needs? If it breaks you can just scrap it or keep it for spares and buy another.

Also, if you use a tripod outdoors and get it wet, covered in dew, etc., then when you get home put it up to full height and dry it off fully before packing it away and storing it. This should reduce the onset of corrosion and prolong its working life. In short; look after your kit and it will usually look after you by lasting longer and being reliable. (y)
 
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#54
EF dead? We will see
I've spoken to canon and unofficially was told anything beyond 5dm5 even if that is released (likely), would be extremely wishful thinking. They are investigating all their rd into RF lenses and bodies are only an afterthought for now. They have nearly half of the lineup out already and more on the way.


Anyone with lots of EF gear will suddenly have to absorb big depreciation at some point not far into the future. I may keep 100macro and 400 5.6 for use with adapters but realistically most are due for like for like replacement within next 1.5-2 years, and even that may prove to be too slow.

Also when I said new car I probably meant something decent just barely meeting euro6....
 
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Jeremy Moore
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#56
I think most people who get a Benbo/Uni-loc really dislike them at first; and don't spend the time getting used to it. I think that's contributed to the lack of popularity... that and the size/weight.

I used a Benbo mK1 then a Trekker for many years. I found them an absolute doddle to use and it was only the weight that eventually turned me away from them (and the height of the Mk 1). Oh, and people used to think I was carrying bagpipes when I had it in my bag........
 

nandbytes

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#57
I've spoken to canon and unofficially was told anything beyond 5dm5 even if that is released (likely), would be extremely wishful thinking. They are investigating all their rd into RF lenses and bodies are only an afterthought for now. They have nearly half of the lineup out already and more on the way.
Anyone with lots of EF gear will suddenly have to absorb big depreciation at some point not far into the future. I may keep 100macro and 400 5.6 for use with adapters but realistically most are due for like for like replacement within next 1.5-2 years, and even that may prove to be too slow.

Also when I said new car I probably meant something decent just barely meeting euro6....
As soon as their sensor tech AF catches up with their DSLRs they'll start killing it or rather leave it to die.
Having spoken to some people who work on sensor AF tech, canon's dual-pixel AF while very good and is very processor intensive. They have one of the weaker processors in the industry so once they catch up there, they'll have AF tech on level of DSLRs or Sony mirrorless.
 
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#58
As soon as their sensor tech AF catches up with their DSLRs they'll start killing it or rather leave it to die.
Having spoken to some people who work on sensor AF tech, canon's dual-pixel AF while very good and is very processor intensive. They have one of the weaker processors in the industry so once they catch up there, they'll have AF tech on level of DSLRs or Sony mirrorless.

Now there's a tangent!
 
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#60
Even if EF lenses are discontinued, that doesn't mean they'll instantly stop working and compel you to replace them all!

It's a bit like computers, when PCs first became popular in the late 90s we had to upgrade or replace them pretty much every year as they would no longer cope with improvements in operating systems and the latest programmes (aps as people now seem to call them).

However, the need to replace or upgrade became less frequent because eventually computers did what we wanted them to do, and did it fast enough not to be a nuisance to our workflow. These days, a good spec computer will probably not need upgrading or replacing for several years.

I believe the same has happened with DSLRs... just how good do we want or need something to be? Something like a Canon 5D iv or Nikon D850 will do most jobs and deliver great looking results. How much can that be improved to the extent you'll instantly want to upgrade?

So, as a camera manufacturer, what would you do to maintain camera sales? You'd probably develop an alternative system and hope the 'buzz' surrounding it will make people believe they need to change. Will that result in a massive difference in image quality or usability? Probably not for a number of years, but people will believe they need to change, so sales will happen.

So I'll be sticking with my EF lenses for a while to come yet, whether they're discontinued (or more likely just allowed to stagnate development-wise) or not. As the saying goes, there's many a good tune been played on an old fiddle. ;)
 
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Raymond
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#61
Even if EF lenses are discontinued, that doesn't mean they'll instantly stop working and compel you to replace them all!

It's a bit like computers, when PCs first became popular in the late 90s we had to upgrade or replace them pretty much every year as they would no longer cope with improvements in operating systems and the latest programmes (aps as people now seem to call them).

However, the need to replace or upgrade became less frequent because eventually computers did what we wanted them to do, and did it fast enough not to be a nuisance to our workflow. These days, a good spec computer will probably not need upgrading or replacing for several years.

I believe the same has happened with DSLRs... just how good do we want or need something to be? Something like a Canon 5D iv or Nikon D850 will do most jobs and deliver great looking results. How much can that be improved to the extent you'll instantly want to upgrade?

So, as a camera manufacturer, what would you do to maintain camera sales? You'd probably develop an alternative system and hope the 'buzz' surrounding it will make people believe they need to change. Will that result in a massive difference in image quality or usability? Probably not for a number of years, but people will believe they need to change, so sales will happen.

So I'll be sticking with my EF lenses for a while to come yet, whether they're discontinued (or more likely just allowed to stagnate development-wise) or not. As the saying goes, there's many a good tune been played on an old fiddle. ;)
I do the same with phones, keep it until i find it annoying, usually as a result of the battery being crap or the OS now too much for the old CPU to handle.

Camera wise....I tend to upgrade with each gen, but for Canon that means every 4-5 years with the 5D series, which is fine. This is the first time I changed bodies in this short amount of time (2 years).

Tripod wise I have had the Manfrotto since i ever started, Canadian i met online from like 2002 recommended to me, the 055Pro, still have it, still like new. Recently bought a Gitzo for weight reasons but i still really like the heft of the Manfrotto.
 
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Jeremy Moore
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#62
Even if EF lenses are discontinued, that doesn't mean they'll instantly stop working and compel you to replace them all!

It's a bit like computers, when PCs first became popular in the late 90s we had to upgrade or replace them pretty much every year as they would no longer cope with improvements in operating systems and the latest programmes (aps as people now seem to call them).

However, the need to replace or upgrade became less frequent because eventually computers did what we wanted them to do, and did it fast enough not to be a nuisance to our workflow. These days, a good spec computer will probably not need upgrading or replacing for several years.

I believe the same has happened with DSLRs... just how good do we want or need something to be? Something like a Canon 5D iv or Nikon D850 will do most jobs and deliver great looking results. How much can that be improved to the extent you'll instantly want to upgrade?

So, as a camera manufacturer, what would you do to maintain camera sales? You'd probably develop an alternative system and hope the 'buzz' surrounding it will make people believe they need to change. Will that result in a massive difference in image quality or usability? Probably not for a number of years, but people will believe they need to change, so sales will happen.

So I'll be sticking with my EF lenses for a while to come yet, whether they're discontinued (or more likely just allowed to stagnate development-wise) or not. As the saying goes, there's many a good tune been played on an old fiddle. ;)

You might be going on a complete tangent but I agree with you 100%.
 
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#63
Rollei got back and as expected it's totally useless to me (send complete tripod to Germany at own expense, then expect to be told sorry your fault). In the mean time I need to buy another so there is no point at all.
Is it possible to 3d print the bits or machine them from Al as I have quite a collection of plastic to replace?
Will keep an eye for 055...

Even if EF lenses are discontinued, that doesn't mean they'll instantly stop working and compel you to replace them all!

It's a bit like computers, when PCs first became popular in the late 90s we had to upgrade or replace them pretty much every year as they would no longer cope with improvements in operating systems and the latest programmes (aps as people now seem to call them).

However, the need to replace or upgrade became less frequent because eventually computers did what we wanted them to do, and did it fast enough not to be a nuisance to our workflow. These days, a good spec computer will probably not need upgrading or replacing for several years.

I believe the same has happened with DSLRs... just how good do we want or need something to be? Something like a Canon 5D iv or Nikon D850 will do most jobs and deliver great looking results. How much can that be improved to the extent you'll instantly want to upgrade?

So, as a camera manufacturer, what would you do to maintain camera sales? You'd probably develop an alternative system and hope the 'buzz' surrounding it will make people believe they need to change. Will that result in a massive difference in image quality or usability? Probably not for a number of years, but people will believe they need to change, so sales will happen.

So I'll be sticking with my EF lenses for a while to come yet, whether they're discontinued (or more likely just allowed to stagnate development-wise) or not. As the saying goes, there's many a good tune been played on an old fiddle. ;)
If you are happy to not upgrade for years when that happens and accept your investment will be worth zero when you do, which means 100% outlay for new gear instead of upgrade costs.... Well that's one way to go about it. I'm not willing to scrap my investment value
 

nandbytes

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#64
I'm not willing to scrap my investment value
exactly the reason I sold my a-mount gear 4 years ago. Now they are really hard to sell and not worth as much. Its false economy to hold on the upgrades if you want to save money.

On the other hand EF has a very large user base so the market won't disappear and hence depreciate as quickly as others.
 
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#65
On the other hand EF has a very large user base so the market won't disappear and hence depreciate as quickly as others.
I'd agree with that to an extent, try and find a cheap Canon FD fit 'L' lens, and how long ago did they discontinue the FD mount?

Combine that with the uncertainty over Brexit and is now really the time to spend lots of money? Short term, if the pound crashes and buying power worsens and availability becomes temporarily scarce, then perhaps... but long-term, who knows? An import duty free trade deal with Japan or the US might change things significantly, but who knows how things are going to pan out? I reckon the only glass worth thinking about investing in at the moment is probably a crystal ball! :cautious:
 
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Raymond
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#67
Prices for old gear only goes 1 direction, especially a system coming to its end.

Sure there is a large user base, however, there will also be an abundance of gear that will come on the market so as those people upgrade to the new system, the market will be saturated with more used gear. I think the ones that feel the bite first are the lower end, the consumer zooms and bodies. When I sold my 85L, the staff had never seen one through the store as it's not a lens they stock. So prices for the high end L will keep their prices the longest.

That said, it will still go 1 way, and that is down.
 
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#68
I'd agree with that to an extent, try and find a cheap Canon FD fit 'L' lens, and how long ago did they discontinue the FD mount?

Combine that with the uncertainty over Brexit and is now really the time to spend lots of money? Short term, if the pound crashes and buying power worsens and availability becomes temporarily scarce, then perhaps... but long-term, who knows? An import duty free trade deal with Japan or the US might change things significantly, but who knows how things are going to pan out? I reckon the only glass worth thinking about investing in at the moment is probably a crystal ball! :cautious:
FD glass was dirt cheap just 10 years ago. 300/2.8l cost me pennies. Then Sony started their mirrorless line and it all started to change.
Still, it doesn't cost close to its new counterpart.
Rather you should think in terms of inferior old model depreciation such as 100-400 mk1, 35 1.4 mk1 and 24 TSE mk1. The old 24-70 is quite a bit cheaper and so is 28-70L...
The FD have manual aperture so could be very attractive to video users. EF glass may not have that appeal and will be simple old adapted Vs new native competition.
In any case it's a value losing proposition. For now I'm holding any EF purchases and will be looking to start the transition either to Sony or RF.
 
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Raymond
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#70
FD glass was dirt cheap just 10 years ago. 300/2.8l cost me pennies. Then Sony started their mirrorless line and it all started to change.
Still, it doesn't cost close to its new counterpart.
Rather you should think in terms of inferior old model depreciation such as 100-400 mk1, 35 1.4 mk1 and 24 TSE mk1. The old 24-70 is quite a bit cheaper and so is 28-70L...
The FD have manual aperture so could be very attractive to video users. EF glass may not have that appeal and will be simple old adapted Vs new native competition.
In any case it's a value losing proposition. For now I'm holding any EF purchases and will be looking to start the transition either to Sony or RF.
I got £490 for my 24-70L mk1 from a store which i thought was excellent as I've had that for 10 years, I think I paid about £900.
 
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Alan
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#72
exactly the reason I sold my a-mount gear 4 years ago. Now they are really hard to sell and not worth as much. Its false economy to hold on the upgrades if you want to save money.

On the other hand EF has a very large user base so the market won't disappear and hence depreciate as quickly as others.
One thing that niggles at me is that it's fine buying old manual lenses as they'll live for decades with just the occasional strip down, clean and lubrication but with more modern AF lenses the electronics will fail and the ribbon cables will crumble and there are multiple reports of crumbling cables in Canon and other make lenses. Older style AF lenses may still be useable as MF lenses if they're beyond economic repair if there's an aperture ring but newer fly by wire AF lenses must surely have a reduced life as when the electronics and cabling fail they'll probably be bricks that'll possibly cost too much to repair in years to come.

I don't know how old an AF DSLR lens I'd buy but I don't think I'd be interested in one with a question mark over it because of its age or the reliability of the lens in general.
 

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#73
One thing that niggles at me is that it's fine buying old manual lenses as they'll live for decades with just the occasional strip down, clean and lubrication but with more modern AF lenses the electronics will fail and the ribbon cables will crumble and there are multiple reports of crumbling cables in Canon and other make lenses. Older style AF lenses may still be useable as MF lenses if they're beyond economic repair if there's an aperture ring but newer fly by wire AF lenses must surely have a reduced life as when the electronics and cabling fail they'll probably be bricks that'll possibly cost too much to repair in years to come.

I don't know how old an AF DSLR lens I'd buy but I don't think I'd be interested in one with a question mark over it because of its age or the reliability of the lens in general.
Well if you want AF lenses with the least number of things that can break then screw driven lenses are quite robust. Like the old Minoltas or Nikon F lenses.

This is really going of tangent since I don't think this is really OPs concern.
His main issue is losing a larger chunk of his investment in glasses than he'd like to.
 
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#74
One thing that niggles at me is that it's fine buying old manual lenses as they'll live for decades with just the occasional strip down, clean and lubrication but with more modern AF lenses the electronics will fail and the ribbon cables will crumble and there are multiple reports of crumbling cables in Canon and other make lenses. Older style AF lenses may still be useable as MF lenses if they're beyond economic repair if there's an aperture ring but newer fly by wire AF lenses must surely have a reduced life as when the electronics and cabling fail they'll probably be bricks that'll possibly cost too much to repair in years to come.

I don't know how old an AF DSLR lens I'd buy but I don't think I'd be interested in one with a question mark over it because of its age or the reliability of the lens in general.
Spot on. The old big "white" tele's are not serviceable any more and in many cases the only solution is to salvage part from scrapyard; a part that may be on its last legs too.
Their value is not looking good already.
It's may be less likely to break in smaller lenses, but as you mentioned simple oxidation over time will take its toll... Full metal design - as discussed about tripods - may just prove the most reliable in the long run. Those old Arri PL, Zeiss and Angeniuex lenses still cost an absolute fortune
 
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Dominic
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#75
I have a centre column bracket on my Benbo which reduces the drunken bagpipes effect. If anyone is considering a Benbo and is put off by the handling this additional little gizmo may help.
I need one of these really. My problem with the benbo is, adjusting the centre column angle when on a smooth floor e.g. laminate, lino, tile.
The legs have a tendency to go wherever they want to. The attachment you have would solve this problem. Other than that, the benbo (I have the large classic version) is a good solid, well built, versatile tripod.
 
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Alan
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#76
I need one of these really. My problem with the benbo is, adjusting the centre column angle when on a smooth floor e.g. laminate, lino, tile.
The legs have a tendency to go wherever they want to. The attachment you have would solve this problem. Other than that, the benbo (I have the large classic version) is a good solid, well built, versatile tripod.
I don't know where you get them from, I had a quick look on the Paterson website and I couldn't see them so maybe you have to contact them?

I agree about the solidity. I haven't used mine in a long time but when I did it wasn't molly coddled and has survived everything the outdoors offer and of course these tripods allow positioning that a conventional up/down centre column through the centre tripod doesn't.
 
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Mike
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#78
I don't care if it is carbon or aluminium. It must not have any magnesium or any other reactive substances inside
Sorry to be pedantic but Aluminium is reactive. Aluminium is directly below magnesium in 'metal activity series' listings. It just forms a fairly inert oxide layer that protects the metal underneath, get a little mercury on the surface (which disrupts the oxide layer) and it will corrode through fairly rapidly.

All my tripods have been brought used, making the costs more reasonable.
 
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#80
Sorry to be pedantic but Aluminium is reactive. Aluminium is directly below magnesium in 'metal activity series' listings. It just forms a fairly inert oxide layer that protects the metal underneath, get a little mercury on the surface (which disrupts the oxide layer) and it will corrode through fairly rapidly.

All my tripods have been brought used, making the costs more reasonable.
Damn, I’ve been successfully resisting pointing this out ;).
 
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