Colours from nowhere

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1,741
Name
Brian
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Yes
#1
I recently took some shots in the popular and much photographed entrance to Kings Cross underground station in London.
I've been there before and on previous visits the backlit wall has been a continuously changing variety of colours.
When I got there I was a little disappointed to find that most of the wall was just plain white, with a small section lit in steady colours.
I was a little disappointed, but I took a few shots anyway of the plain white section of wall (the coloured part was out of this shot.)
To my great surprise, when I reviewed the images I found that, what appeared to be a plain white background showed these colours.
StationEntrance_02.jpg
I was probably there for 10-15 minutes, and at no time was I aware of any changes in the background colour which appeared to remain plain white the whole time.
Can anyone offer an explanation of how a seemingly white, backlit wall can display these colours when photographed?
The photo was taken with my Canon 6DII at 1/640, f5.6 at 1600 iso
 
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23,398
Name
Phil
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No
#2
Lots of light types don't actually output a steady 'white' colour but instead cycle through various colours the result of which is a steady white - a slower shutter speed (<1/60) would show the white that your eyes 'saw'
 
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Brian G
Messages
1,741
Name
Brian
Edit My Images
Yes
#4
Lots of light types don't actually output a steady 'white' colour but instead cycle through various colours the result of which is a steady white - a slower shutter speed (<1/60) would show the white that your eyes 'saw'
That's what I thought, but in the seven or eight shots I took (all with similar exposure settings) the range of colours is always the same - predominantly red and yellow. I would have expected, to make a white result, that all the colours of the spectrum, or at least the three primary colours, would need to be present.
That is quite lovely :D
Thank you - quite unintentional I can assure you!
 
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