Concerned mum wants law changed

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Mark
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I remember when I was working in catering a good few years ago, I was serving a meal to a very high ranking Police Officer. He asked if we had any Cigars, and I replied no. He jokingly replied, "maybe you should get some in". I said I thought you had to have a Licence to sell Tobacco. He scratched his head and said, "I am not sure, I will have to ask my staff on the regulations regarding Tobacco".

I was gobsmacked that he did not know, but there again even he can't know everything.
There's a common misconception that constables should know every single law that exists, which is pretty much impossible - even barristers specialise.

They know the areas of law that they need to on a daily basis, which will vary according to the area that they work in.
Probably the most knowledgeable people on the force are the custody sergeants and inspectors because they have to approve what arrestees are locked up for.
 
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jonbeeza
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Jon
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There's a common misconception that constables should know every single law that exists, which is pretty much impossible - even barristers specialise.

They know the areas of law that they need to on a daily basis, which will vary according to the area that they work in.
Probably the most knowledgeable people on the force are the custody sergeants and inspectors because they have to approve what arrestees are locked up for.
Yes, that would make sense.
 
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There's a common misconception that constables should know every single law that exists, which is pretty much impossible - even barristers specialise.

They know the areas of law that they need to on a daily basis, which will vary according to the area that they work in.
Probably the most knowledgeable people on the force are the custody sergeants and inspectors because they have to approve what arrestees are locked up for.
This is true, a friend of mine was a copper with a rural beat, but it included the home of the then Northern Ireland Secretary James Prior. A Met firearms officer fancied a move to rural Suffolk. Our friend said it was like having a newbie with him as he acclimatised himself to "Rural" laws from the "City" centered laws he was used to enforcing.
 
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