Double DIN car radio with good satnav

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Garry Edwards
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#1
I fancy treating myself to a double DIN car radio with Satnav, and the most important feature for me is the satnav, because although the rubber-sucker one that I already have is fine, I'm sick of it falling off the windscreen, needing to take it off to avoid theft and the trailing wires, so would appreciate some recommendations.

My car is an old Shogun off-road workhorse (most of the contributors to the diesel car thread will love me:) that has double-DIN capability. Here are my requirements:
1. A good Satnav. Is the Satnav as good as in the normal stand-alone satnavs?
2. With big, high cars it can be difficult to stick to the speed limits, especially as I drive a lot of different vehicles. Do the Satnavs come with speed limit warnings, camera warnings and so on?
3. I will want to plug in a reversing camera, especially as I'm always backing up to trailers. Hopefully this will be a tidier solution than a separate monitor for the reversing camera.
3. A big screen that darkens at night.
4. Be able to take phone calls, Android smartphone.

Any advice will be appreciated, thanks.
 
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Garry Edwards
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#3
Thanks for your reply. I've looked up waze, which looks useful - does it have the same features and capability of a dedicated satnav?
 
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Chris
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#4
Can't comment on the sat nav as mine is now built in but when I had a tom tom this https://www.pocketgpsworld.com/ provided and still does up to date speed cameras and you can set warnings.
It used to be free but now I think you have to pay.
I got lifetime membership in the beginning for reporting a speed camera which was not on their database but unfortunately the system in my Toyota cannot be updated except by Toyota which is a pain.
 
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Suz
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#5
The advantage of Waze is that the maps are always up to date. The disadvantage is what happens when you're out of mobile data coverage. Some lose maps so without the dedicated on board maps you can be a bit stuffed. You want one that has the sense to download the maps for the current route and fill in any gaps while you're going along and if you deviate from the route. You may also find if you need to set a new route you can't do it until you have suitable mobile coverage. It just depends on the places you use the routing and maps in.
 
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#6
Navmii has the maps built in to the app so it takes more space but doesn’t need a data connection. If it’s available it has traffic and google search.
I use an iPhone connected to a pioneer double din from a few years back
There are various phone integrations for Android but I use iOS so won’t comment.
You’ll have to connect with a wire so you’re back with some mess and a holder all the same.
I know there are double din units on amazon etc that run android natively so might be worth a look
 

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Hugh
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#7
I think some of the Android ones will let you load things like CoPilot which is a very good satnav.
 
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Ned
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#8
Anything with Apple / Android CarPlay is the way to go (if you can find one that does it via Bluetooth then even better).

Basically inbuilt satnavs are defunct nowadays, Google maps, Apple maps or Waze are always up to date and have very good traffic routing.

Assuming you have a smartphone, of course... and even if you don’t you can borrow someone’s defunct old one and use that with a free/cheap SIM card.
 
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#9
The advantage of Waze is that the maps are always up to date.
I use Google maps from my phone via android auto and honestly I can't think of a time lack of data was a problem. I think these days once you plug in a destination it caches a certain amount of data in advance.

Obviously you need data for the initial search and for traffic updates.

Done over 8000m with it now since Feb.
 
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Garry Edwards
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#11
Thanks for the replies, I think that I now understand the benefits and limitations better.
The concern for me is that I'm frequently in places where there is zero mobile phone signal - in fact I've just got back from 2 days in one of those places, and so would clearly need to keep a conventional satnav in the car, just in case.

It's clear that I need to get one that has maps installed.
What I don't understand is what benefits, if any, exist in buying one of the more expensive makes/models as opposed to one of the cheaper ones, there seems to be a vast range of prices.
 
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#12
Features and sound quality increase as price goes up, so if you want to time align your speakers and set the crossovers then you need to go up the ranges, they have better amps in them too and outputs for external amplifiers.

If you just want something to replace what you have then anything from a decent brand with the features you want will be fine and almost certainly sound better than what you already have.
 
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#13
Beware of Android devices like Pumpkin systems available on Ebay and Amazon. Some of them have a very high standby current and if you don't use your vehicle regularly will drain your battery.
I have spent hours trying to find a parasitic drain on my car battery off over 250ma. I eventually found out it was my Pumpkin android stereo, which I subsequently removed and binned.
I'm now looking at a Kenwood double din with built in satnav and DAB radio,
 
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#14
Thanks for the replies, I think that I now understand the benefits and limitations better.
The concern for me is that I'm frequently in places where there is zero mobile phone signal - in fact I've just got back from 2 days in one of those places, and so would clearly need to keep a conventional satnav in the car, just in case.

It's clear that I need to get one that has maps installed.
What I don't understand is what benefits, if any, exist in buying one of the more expensive makes/models as opposed to one of the cheaper ones, there seems to be a vast range of prices.
Some apps like Co-Pilot download the maps in advance so you subsequently don’t need a mobile signal to use them.
 
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Ned
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#15
Some apps like Co-Pilot download the maps in advance so you subsequently don’t need a mobile signal to use them.
And you can download offline apps on Google maps too.

I used to use copilot but now use google maps (or occasionally Apple maps) as i find the traffic routing better.
 
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Phil
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#17
About a year ago I tested a load of the iOS satnav apps and found that Tomtom had the most up to date traffic and road closure information. It also stores the maps on the device, so no problem if you are without signal. The disadvantage is that it is a paid app, but the time when it picked up a road closure (and no other app did) where a colleague who set out minutes ahead of me was stuck for five hours on a major A road meant it is more than worth the money.

One area I will mark TomTom down is on business / POI search, nothing matches Google for that, so I also have Google maps on my phone for this need.

Ps. I have found that this is the best phone holder. I have had two for around the years and the only time the suction gold is in the summer and the car has gotten very hot. But once you reattach it is good to go.

OsoMount 360 Grip Mount - Black - Universal in Car Holder for iPhone 6/ 6 Plus / 5s /5c /4/4s Samsung Galaxy S5 /S4 /S3 / Note 4/3 & Other Smartphones https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00BFWQQEG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_xVp7CbKPBGDPA
 
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#18
Navmii has all the maps on the device at all times. It's free!
You can pay for various upgrades to get rid of ads, speed cameras and silly voices etc. if you want.
If there's a data signal then you get the advantages of live traffic updates.
It's not perfect but I'd give it a whirl.
 
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Phil
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#19
About a year ago I tested a load of the iOS satnav apps and found that Tomtom had the most up to date traffic and road closure information. It also stores the maps on the device, so no problem if you are without signal. The disadvantage is that it is a paid app, but the time when it picked up a road closure (and no other app did) where a colleague who set out minutes ahead of me was stuck for five hours on a major A road meant it is more than worth the money.

One area I will mark TomTom down is on business / POI search, nothing matches Google for that, so I also have Google maps on my phone for this need.

Ps. I have found that this is the best phone holder. I have had two for around the years and the only time the suction gold is in the summer and the car has gotten very hot. But once you reattach it is good to go.

OsoMount 360 Grip Mount - Black - Universal in Car Holder for iPhone 6/ 6 Plus / 5s /5c /4/4s Samsung Galaxy S5 /S4 /S3 / Note 4/3 & Other Smartphones https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00BFWQQEG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_xVp7CbKPBGDPA
Ps. I have just checked and TomTom is available with a trial, allowing 50 miles of navigation per month. So you can try it out on your couch for as long as you want and then go out on some short journeys.

A couple off other features that not many apps have are the animated lane guidance and a good list of speed and traffic signal cameras
 
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Graham
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#20
I fancy treating myself to a double DIN car radio with Satnav, and the most important feature for me is the satnav, because although the rubber-sucker one that I already have is fine, I'm sick of it falling off the windscreen, needing to take it off to avoid theft and the trailing wires, so would appreciate some recommendations.

My car is an old Shogun off-road workhorse (most of the contributors to the diesel car thread will love me:) that has double-DIN capability. Here are my requirements:
1. A good Satnav. Is the Satnav as good as in the normal stand-alone satnavs?
2. With big, high cars it can be difficult to stick to the speed limits, especially as I drive a lot of different vehicles. Do the Satnavs come with speed limit warnings, camera warnings and so on?
3. I will want to plug in a reversing camera, especially as I'm always backing up to trailers. Hopefully this will be a tidier solution than a separate monitor for the reversing camera.
3. A big screen that darkens at night.
4. Be able to take phone calls, Android smartphone.

Any advice will be appreciated, thanks.
Thought this may be of interest to you: https://www.pistonheads.com/news/ge...ast--google-maps-to-warn-of-speed-traps/40278
 
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Garry Edwards
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Garry Edwards
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#21
Thanks for that, it is interesting.

But, based on the helpful replies I've received, I've decided not to go for one of these, as I feel that it would be a step backwards rather than forwards. Before starting this thread I wrongly assumed that the radios included an actual satnav.

A satnav based on a separate smartphone may work perfectly well for most people, especially when maps are included for when there is no mobile signal, but it wouldn't work for me because I do a lot of driving in areas where there is no mobile phone coverage.

Some time ago I found myself in a position where I needed to give my grid reference to air ambulance. That information came from my satnav, and was invaluable because, although I had a phone signal via 999, there was no 'normal' phone signal, as I found out when I tried to ring the farm to say that I had been delayed. That situation will hopefully never occur again but it's a risk too far for people in remote areas.
 
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#22
I remember a long time ago I had one which I think was canned navsure? It had a pop out screen as it was a single din but I'm sure it had its own GPS antenna and built in upgradable maps. Played dvds as well plus reverse camera I think.

There must be similar stuff on the market?
 
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Brian
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#24
I've got a double din android unit in my Insignia, it came with mountings/surround so it looks like a factory unit.

In the past I used it with CoPilot which has the UK map downloaded (so no mobile data required) but changed across to using Waze as it gave traffic guidance etc


installed.jpg
 
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#25
A satnav based on a separate smartphone may work perfectly well for most people, especially when maps are included for when there is no mobile signal, but it wouldn't work for me because I do a lot of driving in areas where there is no mobile phone coverage.

As previously mentioned there are navigation apps (like copilot) that download all the maps to your phone when installed. That means you don’t need mobile coverage to subsequently use them.
 
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Phil
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#26
Thanks for that, it is interesting.

But, based on the helpful replies I've received, I've decided not to go for one of these, as I feel that it would be a step backwards rather than forwards. Before starting this thread I wrongly assumed that the radios included an actual satnav.

A satnav based on a separate smartphone may work perfectly well for most people, especially when maps are included for when there is no mobile signal, but it wouldn't work for me because I do a lot of driving in areas where there is no mobile phone coverage.

Some time ago I found myself in a position where I needed to give my grid reference to air ambulance. That information came from my satnav, and was invaluable because, although I had a phone signal via 999, there was no 'normal' phone signal, as I found out when I tried to ring the farm to say that I had been delayed. That situation will hopefully never occur again but it's a risk too far for people in remote areas.
Hi Garry, I am struggling to understand your requirement that differentiates between a mobile phone without signal and a satnav. As far as I am concerned they are basically the same, except the specific functions of the unit.

Regarding GPS locations, a mobile device could still give you these without a mobile signal. If you had OS mapping installed it could also give OS grid reference. Heres a screenshot of the inbuilt compass app on iOS running in airplane mode:-
 
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