Beginner exposure

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7,484
Name
Ken
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What type of subjects?
 
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Ian
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You can get more light by creating more light. If your photos are inside, this is possible with additional normal light sources like lamps. You could also use additional light sources like flash - either dedicated units, or smaller units that mount on your camera. In fact, your camera may have a pop up flash.

You can get more light by opening the aperture, also known as the f number. Your camera manual should tell you how to do this. If it doesn't, you may have an automatic camera that doesn't allow you to change it. Also, lens apertures will only open so far, so once it's open as wide as it will go you're out of luck getting more light unless you use a different (usually more expensive) lens that has a wider aperture.

You can get more light by slowing the shutter speed. Your camera manual should tell you how to do this. If it doesn't, you may have an automatic camera that doesn't allow you to change it. Slower shutter speeds have a side effect of introducing blur through either subject movement or camera movement. Most people use a tripod to fix the latter. Nothing you can do apart from the former other than tell it to be still which works with some subjects, but not others.

You can kinda get more light by dialling up your ISO. Your camera manual should tell you how to do this. If it doesn't, you may have an automatic camera that doesn't allow you to change it. This doesn't actually let more light in, it just makes the sensor better able to deal with the limited light available. The side effect to this is noise, or grain in the image. This can be desirable or not depending on you, and the camera.

Finally, there is usually an "exposure compensation" feature (back to your manual) that allows you to "tweak" and exposure up or down with a simple dial and without having to worry about the above three options.

Hope this helps!
 
OP
M
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8
Name
sello
Edit My Images
Yes
You can get more light by creating more light. If your photos are inside, this is possible with additional normal light sources like lamps. You could also use additional light sources like flash - either dedicated units, or smaller units that mount on your camera. In fact, your camera may have a pop up flash.

You can get more light by opening the aperture, also known as the f number. Your camera manual should tell you how to do this. If it doesn't, you may have an automatic camera that doesn't allow you to change it. Also, lens apertures will only open so far, so once it's open as wide as it will go you're out of luck getting more light unless you use a different (usually more expensive) lens that has a wider aperture.

You can get more light by slowing the shutter speed. Your camera manual should tell you how to do this. If it doesn't, you may have an automatic camera that doesn't allow you to change it. Slower shutter speeds have a side effect of introducing blur through either subject movement or camera movement. Most people use a tripod to fix the latter. Nothing you can do apart from the former other than tell it to be still which works with some subjects, but not others.

You can kinda get more light by dialling up your ISO. Your camera manual should tell you how to do this. If it doesn't, you may have an automatic camera that doesn't allow you to change it. This doesn't actually let more light in, it just makes the sensor better able to deal with the limited light available. The side effect to this is noise, or grain in the image. This can be desirable or not depending on you, and the camera.

Finally, there is usually an "exposure compensation" feature (back to your manual) that allows you to "tweak" and exposure up or down with a simple dial and without having to worry about the above three options.

Hope this helps!
thank you very much, just the information i needed since now am working with artificial lighting and triggers
 
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6,490
Name
Ian
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One last thing. If you are using flash, then the shutter speed is often* largely irrelevant in controlling the light coming into the camera because the superbright flash delivers a ton of light in an extremely short time. Just make sure your shutter speed is no faster than the sync speed (manual time again) and you'll be ok. Control the amount of light with aperture and flash power.

*at slower speeds you risk the ambient light being revealed as well as the flash illumination which may or may not be something you want
 
OP
M
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8
Name
sello
Edit My Images
Yes
One last thing. If you are using flash, then the shutter speed is often* largely irrelevant in controlling the light coming into the camera because the superbright flash delivers a ton of light in an extremely short time. Just make sure your shutter speed is no faster than the sync speed (manual time again) and you'll be ok. Control the amount of light with aperture and flash power.

*at slower speeds you risk the ambient light being revealed as well as the flash illumination which may or may not be something you want
will surely keep that in mind
 

TheBigYin

Staff member
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Mark
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Hi Sello @MOGOPA215118456 - maybe I can offer you and all your friends who have signed up to this forum a little bit of friendly advice...

if you sign up, and your first post is a single sentance question asking "what is...." - you're going to get a few of the members pushing back or saying "just do your own homework/google it".

However, if you go into the beginners forum, introduce yourself, give a quick "biography" or details of what you do, what you like shooting, what you feel you'd like to learn from being here, and how you think you could maybe help others on here" then you'll get a far more welcoming response.

If you then proceed to share some of your photo's in one of the photo sharing sections that'd be brilliant. Same thing if you apply your knowledge of photography to giving critique and feedback on other peoples images,

What I'm saying here, is that this is a community, not just a reference library staffed by people for your assitance. Join, participate, give something to the community, and it'll be reciprocated many, many times over.

Don't be offended if people post links to various websites in answer to a question, very often these posted links ARE the best resource that the person knows to explain it - it's a "curated" link if you will. I've posted many links to your college compatriots questions already - because, frankly, the best info I know was in them, and not only was I not going to plagiarise the other site, I wasn't about to re-type 5000+ words and source multiple photos and diagrams in illustration.

You may notice a marker against my name stating that I'm a Staff Member here. As such, what i've stated above would probably be a good thing to take on board, and to pass onto your friends who may also be posting on here - and perhaps also feed back to the lecturer who pointed you at this forum in the first place...

Enjoy your time within our community :)
 
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54
Name
Annet
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Well, I'm not sure what subjects are under consideration here and it would be great if you asked your questions in a more detailed form (so that people would know what kind of help do you need), but here is a guide on fixing dark photos that could be useful for you as a beginner.
That being said, I absolutely second TheBigYin's advice about presenting yourself before asking questions. TP is a great community full of friendly people who are ready to help you, but you need to help them to get to know you first.
 
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