Beginner how to use spyder pro properly

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#1
Hi
so I may edit in daytime in natural lights or at night using LED room lights. When calibrating we are first asked to measure ambient lighting and if I do so with either natural light or room lights, I get a message saying "too much ambient lighting". So how do we really have to measure this? and if you do so with dim lighting/dark room, how does it affect when you actually edit photos in "normal" lighting?
Thanks
 
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#3
I use one at work but only ever edit in consistent lighting there - dimmed lights and blackout blinds. The results were pretty good though blacks appear a bit too light in my opinion. At home I've got an old Huey Pro and have calibrated for a dark room, it still works well in daytime without the light compensation switched on. I don't think the Spyder is better than the old Huey in my view, it's trying to be a bit too clever
 
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#5
I use one at work but only ever edit in consistent lighting there - dimmed lights and blackout blinds. The results were pretty good though blacks appear a bit too light in my opinion. At home I've got an old Huey Pro and have calibrated for a dark room, it still works well in daytime without the light compensation switched on. I don't think the Spyder is better than the old Huey in my view, it's trying to be a bit too clever
So would you calibrate in dark and edit in dark also?
 
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#6
https://www.w3.org/Graphics/Color/sRGB

If you're calibrating to sRGB, then it has an ambient viewing condition specified - see table 1.

The calibration is only correct at that viewing condiition. Unlike the newer specs, I've never seen a table of what changes are needed for different, non-reference viewing conditions.
 
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#7
Logically (?) I think it might be appropriate to run two calibrations i.e. one for each siutation. That will create 2 profiles, you should be able to give each one a unique name......then manually (each time as needed) go into the display management and pick the profile you wish to use.

A bit of a faff perhaps and for the record I edit after dusk in a very dimly lit room and the lightbulb in the room is a 6500k led bulb.
 
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#10
That's correct. Unless you can edit in consistent lighting I think Box Brownie has the best solution for your needs - I was thinking along those lines but wasn't sure if that was possible
But a caveat would be that ~ in the 'dimly lit after dark room' there is a consistency of the very limited ambient light (IMO the best arrangement).....................however the daylight setting is in effect limited in use because the ambient light will vary from season to season let alone day to day. Though possibly better than nothing provided "your daylight editing day" is an overcast one rather than a bright sunny one???
 
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#11
I normally edit at night. But room lights are 9 daylight LED ceiling lights so very bright indeed. Obviously without them on room is pretty dark
 
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#12
I normally edit in the day's ambient light but have calibrated my monitor for evenings with the curtains closed. When I am printing a critical photo, I will do a quick re-edit in the evening with the curtains closed to make sure the colours are just right.
 
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#13
I normally edit in the day's ambient light but have calibrated my monitor for evenings with the curtains closed. When I am printing a critical photo, I will do a quick re-edit in the evening with the curtains closed to make sure the colours are just right.
if I want to print like a photobook that would mean re-editing quite a few photos again! unless I can set a pre-set to make life easier?
 
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