Ilford Delta 3200

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Mads
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#1
So, as I mentioned in the FPOTY thread (@ChrisR) , I first shot my entry on Delta 3200 at box speed.
After developing, I noticed every frame was woefully underexposed. I'd taken them all according to the meter reading I'd taken, with the same meter thats worked a treat for almost every other shot I've taken using its reading.
I did wonder if perhaps it was underdeveloped, but the edge markings are properly black, so I've more or less ruled that idea out.
After scanning, they just looked awful, so I had to reshoot on different film to get an entry.

I'm a big fan of delta in general, but these were just far too grainy for my liking.

delta3200rb67002
by Madison S, on Flickr
delta3200rb67001
by Madison S, on Flickr

Once I'm home from work tomorrow I'll try to get a photo of the negs themselves
 
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Asha

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#2
I've always found it starnge how the same brand of film sometimes offers extreme differences in IQ depending upon ISO or film format.

I pretty much shoot Delta 100 and (occasionally 400) exclusively now in 35mm and 120 format, developed in HC110, the results are generally good.

With LF I don't shoot film faster than 100 iso so I can't comment on how good that sized format is in 400 speed.

I've only ever shot one roll of 120 format ilford 3200 and the negs looked like they had been dragged through mud.

I do know that in my experience other brands ( Rollei, Fomapan, Kodak etc) have also varied considerably dependant on format and speed
 
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Peter
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#3
Roger Hicks suggests that 3200 is not a true speed for this film, although he does have fairly firm opinions at times. ;)http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subscription/choosing bw films.html
Ultra-fast films
It is disputable whether there are two or three of these. Ilford Delta 3200 and Kodak T-Max P3200 (TMZ -- P-for-Push) both have box speeds of 3200, while Fuji Neopan 1600 has a box speed of 1600. Unlike slow, medium and fast films, however, these are not true ISO speeds. These three films are especially designed for 'pushing' (see below) and will give good results at their box speeds, but these are not their ISO speeds.

Neopan 1600 may just about be able to get in sight of ISO 800 in a speed increasing developer; Kodak's TMZ P3200 is hard put to top 1000; and Ilford Delta 3200, the fastest (and also the grainiest) can reach 1250 or so. In fact, one may regard Neopan 1600 as being (in the words of one emulsion chemist) 'a very good, very pushable ISO 400 film': it is less than 1/3 stop faster than Ilford HP5 Plus. This is why we say that it is disputable whether there are two or three ultra-fast films.
 

Asha

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#4
" 'a very good, very pushable ISO 400 film': it is less than 1/3 stop faster than Ilford HP5 Plus."

Well that would suggest paying considerably less for a roll of 400 speed HP5 or Delta and pushing it three stops is the better option if a film speed of 3200 is required.
 
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Stephen
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#5
I shot delta 3200 at stock speeds and didnt get grainy results but I did get quite a few underexposed but I think was me expecting too much from my camera metering.

how did you develop?
 
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Gareth (Not Gary!)
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#8
I shot a roll in December (including my entry to last months FPOTY theme). The shots are grainy, but none of them were underexposed as such. It was nice to be able to shoot at f/8 in more dimly lit interiors.

My Flickr album is at https://flickr.com/photos/10407404@N00/sets/72157704796318895
That's a lovely album of Delta 3200 shots. I too really like it as a film. Shot it in 35mm and 120 at a couple weddings (massive grain in 35mm but cool) and shot a few portraits with it. I only have one on my Flickr though.

 
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Nige
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#9
That's a lovely album of Delta 3200 shots. I too really like it as a film. Shot it in 35mm and 120 at a couple weddings (massive grain in 35mm but cool) and shot a few portraits with it. I only have one on my Flickr though.

Thanks Gareth. I've only shot the one roll of 35mm. Straight afterwards I shot a roll of Tmax P3200, but think I prefer the Delta shots on the whole. Similarly to Hp5+ / Tri-X, I think the Ilford film retains a little more detail in the shadows whereas the Kodak stuff is more contrasty. I've only shot the one roll of each so far though (although I have two other rolls of P3200 that I received from my Secret Santa).

Lovely portrait BTW. (y)
 
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#10
Just been looking at the Massive Dev Chart for this film in XTOL, which is what I'm proposing to use if I shoot it next weekend for the OOD Film Day. Times are extremely close together for stock XTOL and the film shot at different speeds, with 6 mins @ 800, 6.5 mins @ 1600 and 7.5 mins @ 3200, and it would be interesting to hear from anyone who has used this combo.
 
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#12
How can you suggest such a thing? Its not Rogers fault that he is the ultimate authority on every subject.
I've got a couple of his books and used to enjoy his fortnightly column in AP while it lasted, but I respected him more for his technical knowledge than his photography. :notworthy:
 
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#13
Roger Hicks suggests that 3200 is not a true speed for this film, although he does have fairly firm opinions at times. ;)http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subscription/choosing bw films.html
Ilford do not claim it is ISO 3200 - they do not mention ISO at all. If you look at the Delta 3200 box, it says that it has an EI of 3200. ISO means it has been through a rigorous testing regime and the quoted number is that which is generated by the ISO process. EI just means they think it will work well if exposed that way.
 
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#14
John, that was interesting enough to send me for a quick look at the Ilford data sheet, which says: https://www.ilfordphoto.com/amfile/file/download/file/1913/product/682/

"DELTA 3200 Professional has an ISO speed rating of 1000/31° (1000ASA, 31 DIN) to daylight. The ISO speed was measured using ILFORD ID-11 developer at 20°C/68°F with intermittent agitation in a spiral tank. It should be noted that exposure index (EI) range recommended for DELTA 3200 Professional is based on a practical evaluation of film speed and is not based on foot speed, as is the ISO standard."

That's useful information as I would have been tempted to downrate a 17 year old film anyway, and there is only about half a minute difference in XTOL.
 

Asha

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#15
Ilford do not claim it is ISO 3200 - they do not mention ISO at all. If you look at the Delta 3200 box, it says that it has an EI of 3200. ISO means it has been through a rigorous testing regime and the quoted number is that which is generated by the ISO process. EI just means they think it will work well if exposed that way.
Now if what you say is correct ( which I think it is) then it is ( to me anyway) a cause for concern as having looked at just one UK retailer who is used regulary by filmies on TP, their advertisment for Ilford Delta 3200 film states this:

QUOTE" Ilford DELTA 3200 PROFESSIONAL is an ultra high speed black and white film and the fastest film available today. Whilst rated officially at 3200asa/iso it may be exposed from 800 - 25000, provided the correct developer type and adjustments are made." QUOTE

They clearly state " Whilst rated officially at 3200 asa/iso"

With all due respect, if that is not the case then AFAIK the product cannot be advertised as such.
 
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RaglanSurf

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#16
Now if what you say is correct ( which I think it is) then it is ( to me anyway) a cause for concern as having looked at just one UK retailer who is used regulary by filmies on TP, their advertisment for Ilford Delta 3200 film states this:

QUOTE" Ilford DELTA 3200 PROFESSIONAL is an ultra high speed black and white film and the fastest film available today. Whilst rated officially at 3200asa/iso it may be exposed from 800 - 25000, provided the correct developer type and adjustments are made." QUOTE

They clearly state " Whilst rated officially at 3200 asa/iso"

With all due respect, if that is not the case then AFAIK the product cannot be advertised as such.
A lot depends on your definition of “officially” ;)
 

StephenM

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#18
On the whole, I'd agree with Asha. "ISO" and "ASA" should refer to values obtained by testing according to the standard. "EI" has normally been reserved/used for film speeds actually used (for whatever reason). Not everyone has a development regime as rigid as the ISO one, nor use the same developer. Thermometers may vary, shutter speeds might be awry, and even aperture markings can't be guaranteed. It's probably surprising if ISO ratings work for anyone :)
 
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