Lensmaster gimbal head

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#41
Hi Rob. Whilst you can offset inbalance with additional friction the reality is that in use with heavy glass a correctly balanced Gimbal is far more efficient to use than an un balanced slightly tightened one. Both will work it's just one works better.
 
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Robert
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#42
Hi Rob. Whilst you can offset inbalance with additional friction the reality is that in use with heavy glass a correctly balanced Gimbal is far more efficient to use than an un balanced slightly tightened one. Both will work it's just one works better.
I'm happy to save £300+ and have slight tightness :)
 
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#44
Hi Rob. Whilst you can offset inbalance with additional friction the reality is that in use with heavy glass a correctly balanced Gimbal is far more efficient to use than an un balanced slightly tightened one. Both will work it's just one works better.
We all have differences of opinion and I don't wish to argue but Its not far more efficient at all, the Lensmaster works as explained in my previous post .
Rob.
 
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Mark
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#45
I've used a lensmaster RH2 for the past 4 years, nikon 500mm F4 and various bodies, great bit of kit that just works, unless you've more money than sense why pay more?
 
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Gary
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#46
So the lensmaster doesn't work with all lenses unless you are lucky. If not you need to put some friction on the head.

The wimberley will work without having any friction applied at all.

The lensmaster is a compromise. If a compromise is worth x number of pounds to people then buy it. Personally I wouldnt give it house room because of the very fact that it is compromised.
 
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#47
So the lensmaster doesn't work with all lenses unless you are lucky. If not you need to put some friction on the head.

The wimberley will work without having any friction applied at all.

The lensmaster is a compromise. If a compromise is worth x number of pounds to people then buy it. Personally I wouldnt give it house room because of the very fact that it is compromised.
You have to adjust the height though to get the perfect balance. If using different lenses, then you have to change the height.
Personally I wouldn't give the wimberley house room because I have more sense than money. :p
 
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#50
Do you guys use your gimbals for air shows?

I went to RIAT last year and used my 150-600 handheld.. .and also at Cosford, but noticed there was a guy with a large lens (probably a 500 or 600 Canon) on a gimbal - I understand why he would need to do that but is there any sense in doing it for a 150-600? Is tracking the aircraft easier etc?
 
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#51
Do you guys use your gimbals for air shows?

I went to RIAT last year and used my 150-600 handheld.. .and also at Cosford, but noticed there was a guy with a large lens (probably a 500 or 600 Canon) on a gimbal - I understand why he would need to do that but is there any sense in doing it for a 150-600? Is tracking the aircraft easier etc?
A bit of both ,when shooting helicopters or prop plains you may well drop down to 1/80 sec for say a chinook or 1/125sec for a Lynx so some support will help.
Rob.
 
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#53
Do you guys use your gimbals for air shows?

I went to RIAT last year and used my 150-600 handheld.. .and also at Cosford, but noticed there was a guy with a large lens (probably a 500 or 600 Canon) on a gimbal - I understand why he would need to do that but is there any sense in doing it for a 150-600? Is tracking the aircraft easier etc?
IMHO, if you can manage it handheld, then that is the way to go.
I really don't understand using a gimbal on a monopod... an inexpensive tilt/pan-tilt head will do just as well (Sirui L10/L20).
 
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#55
Ok thanks, makes sense. But with a fast fighter jet best to hand hold ?
If there doing one of those super fast flybys and your close then yes it really depends on how far away they are and how fast there going relative to your position.
Rob.
 
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#56
Really funny watching the people with £600 gimbals trying to justify them.

I'm sure they a really nice, but certainly not worth the money paid and my lensmaster does exactly what I need it to do without up and down adjustment.
I did pick up a Wimberley MkI at a good price and having had a Manfrotto 393 and a Lensmaster I can assure you that the Wimberley is in a class way above for smoothness and build quality ... people pay over £600 for a tripod to ensure a stable platform, it makes sense to get the best that you can afford.
 
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#58
but if you were doing wildlife photography for instance, with a 500/600mm lens surely one needs a gimbal for stability as hand holding is nigh impossible for sharp, clean photos?
There are a lot of situational variables... I use a 400/2.8 (+TCs) and I almost never use a tripod. I do if set in one place for extended times and it's conducive, but that is rare (using a tripod in a situation where you can't move much is very limiting). As I noted early on, I've switched back to using pan-tilt heads (UniqBall).

Obviously, if not using a tripod (or other stable support) then the SS will generally need to be higher (unless panning). But don't think an unlocked gimbal head significantly reduces that requirement... it's really only supporting the weight, it's doing next to nothing for preventing camera shake other than alleviating muscle fatigue.
 
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#59
IMHO, if you can manage it handheld, then that is the way to go.
I really don't understand using a gimbal on a monopod... an inexpensive tilt/pan-tilt head will do just as well (Sirui L10/L20).
I use my gimbal on my monopod as I don't see the point in spending more money for another head when I already own the gimbal. :)
The reason I use my monopod is due to me being a bit of a weakling, and the camera moving about. I find the monopod provides enough stability, and as a result, I take more sharp/in focus images.
If I'm spending a lot of time in the one place, then the gimbal goes onto my tripod.
 
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#60
but if you were doing wildlife photography for instance, with a 500/600mm lens surely one needs a gimbal for stability as hand holding is nigh impossible for sharp, clean photos?
For me it depends on the gear really. With a Sigma 150-600 on my 1DX shooting say a static bird at 600mm I have to keep the shutter speed at 1000th to make sure there is no degradation due to my shaking. I did try and add a 1.4x TC to the mix and definitely needed support regardless of shutter speed.
With my m4/3 gear both body and lens have IS capability combined so even shooting handheld at 840mm FF equivalent I'm confident.
 

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#62
Has anyone changed from a Manfrotto 393 to a lensmaster?

Seriously considering switching mine for an LM but need to try one first, I think :thinking:
As I mentioned previously (post #19), I usually use a 393 but for my last ISS effort I used the RH-2 and I really liked it.
But my situation is a bit different to yours: my company has both in stock so I'll just grab whichever is available when I need something.
If I owned my own 393, would I sell it and but an RH-2? I don't think so, but I'm not sure. Yet.
 
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#63
Do you guys use your gimbals for air shows?

I went to RIAT last year and used my 150-600 handheld.. .and also at Cosford, but noticed there was a guy with a large lens (probably a 500 or 600 Canon) on a gimbal - I understand why he would need to do that but is there any sense in doing it for a 150-600? Is tracking the aircraft easier etc?
That might have been me as I was using an EF500MM
 
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#64
but if you were doing wildlife photography for instance, with a 500/600mm lens surely one needs a gimbal for stability as hand holding is nigh impossible for sharp, clean photos?
Getting sharp shots hand held with lenses like a 500 F4 or bigger is actually quite easy as the sheer weight of the lens damps down the small vibrations that can ruin photographs. I use my 800mm F5.6 hand held about a third of the time. There is a catch however (there always is!) hand holding a long heavy lens gets very tiring very quickly which is why I use a Gimbal and tripod whenever practical.

Currently I use two Gimbal heads, the Lensmaster RH 1 and Wimberley 2.

With lighter lenses the RH 1 is a great option and functions well especially with standard camera bodies. It is cheap, robustly made and roughly half the weight of a "Full" Gimbal. I think you would be quite happy with one of these for your 150-600. The "Full" Gimbal heads really come into their own if one is using larger and heavier lenses and, despite some comments, the vertical adjustment can be critical to getting a good balance with some larger lenses - well every one that I own or have owned!
 
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#65
I have used several over the last few years including the lens master gh2,only recently migrating to a jobu gimbal head and its like driving a rolls after having had a mini
 
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#66
I have used several over the last few years ,only recently migrating to a jobu gimbal head and its like driving a rolls after having had a mini
....I have the small Jobu Jr-3 Deluxe which I use mounted on a Platypod Max < A very useful setup in hides for example. Jobu gimbals are excellent in all respects.

Otherwise I have one of the first Gitzo Fluid Gimbal Heads in the UK and have used it regularly for 6 weeks mounted on a Gitzo Systematic tripod and supporting a Canon 500mm F/4L II. While out in the field I have let friends have a half-hour play/shoot with it while I have transferred my camera to their gimbal. Result is that 2 are now selling their Wimberley 2 and 3 others have now ordered the Gitzo. I found the Wimberley 2 to feel too loose by comparison as the Gitzo's fluid damping does so much to help nail the shots. The Wimberley 2 is very good indeed but if you try out the Gitzo Fluid Gimbal you'll understand that the difference is like chalk and cheese.

https://www.talkphotography.co.uk/threads/so-who-is-getting-the-new-gitzo-gimbal-fluid-head.671248/
 
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#67
....I have the small Jobu Jr-3 Deluxe which I use mounted on a Platypod Max < A very useful setup in hides for example. Jobu gimbals are excellent in all respects.

Otherwise I have one of the first Gitzo Fluid Gimbal Heads in the UK and have used it regularly for 6 weeks mounted on a Gitzo Systematic tripod and supporting a Canon 500mm F/4L II. While out in the field I have let friends have a half-hour play/shoot with it while I have transferred my camera to their gimbal. Result is that 2 are now selling their Wimberley 2 and 3 others have now ordered the Gitzo. I found the Wimberley 2 to feel too loose by comparison as the Gitzo's fluid damping does so much to help nail the shots. The Wimberley 2 is very good indeed but if you try out the Gitzo Fluid Gimbal you'll understand that the difference is like chalk and cheese.

https://www.talkphotography.co.uk/threads/so-who-is-getting-the-new-gitzo-gimbal-fluid-head.671248/
Long lens users have been saying similar things about the beneficial effects of a bit of fluid damping for a long time, often in relation to the very cheap (like £50-ish) gimbals widely available under different names on Amazon/ebay. They're very simple devices with plain bearings, no fancy roller or ball-bearings, but when properly adjusted and lubricated with good grease (which usually means a bit of DIY, lots of YouTube vids on that) then they appear to work well. I don't speak from personal experience but this guy swapped his Wimberley and Jobo gimbals for a cheapy Beike 45

This is not rocket science. The benefits of fluid damping have been known to movie makers like forever and now that a big name like Gitzo has waded in, no doubt Wimberley etc will produce fluid-damped versions soon. Just the excuse they need to push the price up to £1000 :eek:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmvcui3m_a4
 
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#68
I just sold one of the cheapo Chinese ones that I had stripped down and rebuilt ,unfortunately they are definetly not as good as a proper one even cleaned ,greased and ptfe washers added ( I do have a engineering background so I know what I'm doing ) and I suppose a lot depends on what body and lens combo you use to
 
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#69
I have a redundant lensmaster one I do not use, I replaced it with a RRS one which I like as being a component item you can fold it up and also use it as a pano head, the best thing I did to the Lensmaster item was to fit a RRS arca plate to the base allowing me to clamp and remove it from my tripod quickly.
 
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#71
I just sold one of the cheapo Chinese ones that I had stripped down and rebuilt ,unfortunately they are definetly not as good as a proper one even cleaned ,greased and ptfe washers added ( I do have a engineering background so I know what I'm doing ) and I suppose a lot depends on what body and lens combo you use to
....What is it I keep telling you ,Grasshopper? < Buy cheap buy twice :D. Glad you are getting your gear sorted, Jeff.
 
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Adam
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#72
I rea
That guy sounds like me...
I've been trying to explain this to Wimberley users for decades to no avail...
l really like the look of the manfrotto n8 nitro head but want to see one in the flesh first, I can imagine it be really good upmin Scotland filming the red squirrels etc, last year I was lucky enough to watch a weasel working a bank but struggle to smoothly follow it while filming
 
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#73
ok my opinion for what it is worth , I have the Wimberley 2, lens master rh2 , and a heavy ball head, all handle my lenses for wildlife on mainly my carbon fibre monopod, I should say that my lenses are all heavy primes 300mm 2.8 , 400mm 4.5 , 500mm 4.5 , pick of the bunch is the ball head for no other reason than its more compact, the Wimberley is awesome but heavy, and the lens master is really good I have had the shortest time but was surprised by its size weight and build quality, I had some how thought it would be lighter and made from thinner alloy, I don't like the cheap lens plates supplied with it but that's just because they tend to let heavy lenses twist on the plates
 
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#74
I have a redundant lensmaster one I do not use, I replaced it with a RRS one which I like as being a component item you can fold it up and also use it as a pano head, the best thing I did to the Lensmaster item was to fit a RRS arca plate to the base allowing me to clamp and remove it from my tripod quickly.
If you decide to sell it on please let me know..!
 
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