Metz 45 CL4 and Polaroid Land camera

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#1
Hoping someone out there can help me understand how to use this flash in auto mode. The more I read the more I seem to get confused.

I have a Polaroid 180 Land camera and a Metz 45 CL-4 flash. Normally I would experiment with various settings but the film is a bit to expensive to waste and reading the instructions is just confusing me.

The camera manual says I need to set the mode to “X” and a shutter speed of 125th when using an electronic flash (I had read somewhere that the camera will sync to its max of 500th). This camera is a fully manual model.

So imagine I were in a poorly lit room and there isn't enough light to take a shot with a quick enough shutter speed to prevent camera shake. I add the flash but how do I select the shutter speed and aperture on the camera? what are the deciding factors? Even with auto flash does shutter speed still control ambient exposure?

The flash manual says I have to set the flash to the same aperture as the camera. Would moving the aperture setting on the flash then act as flash exposure compensation?

I have attached links to the manuals for reference.

http://ebgy.free.fr/photo/docs/45CL4_e.pdf

http://jameskbeard.com/Photography/Other_Manuals/Polaroid_180_Manual_OCR.pdf
 
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Phil
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#2
It shouldn't be too difficult, (I think you're over complicating it) with a fully manual camera and an auto thryistor flash, it's how we worked for years, and you can experiment with a digital body to check out the flashes actual output.

Set you camera for the ambient (up to X sync), then set the auto setting on the flash to match the aperture on the camera, adjust to taste.
 
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#3
Or you could try this:

  1. Set the shutter to 'X' sync
  2. Set the Metz to Manual Full Power
  3. Measure the distance,in metres, from the subject to the Metz
  4. Divide 45 (the guide number in metres) by the measured distance
  5. Set the aperture to the result.
For example: if the subject is 3 metres from the flashgun, set the aperture to f16 (45/3=15 so the nearest f-stop is 16).

If using bounce flash, measure from the flash to the surface and from the surface to the subject.
 
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#4
Thanks for the quick responses. @Phil V I am way over complicating things, something seems to have gone wrong in my understanding. @Sejanus Aelianus thanks but I was hoping to keep it simpler than that by using the auto mode.

I do know that if I twist the dial on top of the flash it adjusts the flash power.The smaller the aperture the higher the power output. But in a darker room what would dictate the camera aperture setting, depth of field?
 
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Phil
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#5
Or you could try this:

  1. Set the shutter to 'X' sync
  2. Set the Metz to Manual Full Power
  3. Measure the distance,in metres, from the subject to the Metz
  4. Divide 45 (the guide number in metres) by the measured distance
  5. Set the aperture to the result.
For example: if the subject is 3 metres from the flashgun, set the aperture to f16 (45/3=15 so the nearest f-stop is 16).

If using bounce flash, measure from the flash to the surface and from the surface to the subject.
How are we measuring the bounced flash distance and what compensation do we use for the bounce surface?
 
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Phil
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#6
...

I do know that if I twist the dial on top of the flash it adjusts the flash power.The smaller the aperture the higher the power output. But in a darker room what would dictate the camera aperture setting, depth of field?
You!
The multiple auto flash setting is designed to allow you to shoot how you need, just like ETTL. from memory it was more consistent.

My method for auto flash is to start with how I want the ambient to look, with regard to the DoF required. Then zoom and bounce the flash.
 
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Richard
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#7
Hoping someone out there can help me understand how to use this flash in auto mode. The more I read the more I seem to get confused.

I have a Polaroid 180 Land camera and a Metz 45 CL-4 flash. Normally I would experiment with various settings but the film is a bit to expensive to waste and reading the instructions is just confusing me.
Quite! Hook it up to your Canon 5D3 and check results that way.

The camera manual says I need to set the mode to “X” and a shutter speed of 125th when using an electronic flash (I had read somewhere that the camera will sync to its max of 500th). This camera is a fully manual model.
Sounds right. 1/125sec should be safe, or longer speeds. Higher speeds also in theory, if the x-sync is still in good working order.

So imagine I were in a poorly lit room and there isn't enough light to take a shot with a quick enough shutter speed to prevent camera shake. I add the flash but how do I select the shutter speed and aperture on the camera? what are the deciding factors? Even with auto flash does shutter speed still control ambient exposure?

The flash manual says I have to set the flash to the same aperture as the camera. Would moving the aperture setting on the flash then act as flash exposure compensation?

I have attached links to the manuals for reference.

http://ebgy.free.fr/photo/docs/45CL4_e.pdf

http://jameskbeard.com/Photography/Other_Manuals/Polaroid_180_Manual_OCR.pdf
For a flash-only exposure, try 1/125sec at f/8, and set the flash to f/8. Or take meter readings with your Canon and transfer them. That little window next to the sub-flash is the exposure sensor that measures light reflected back from the subject and cuts off the flash output when it's received enough light to match the aperture setting. Yes, shutter speed controls ambient exposure, but not flash. Aperture and ISO affects both ambient and flash. Flash exposure compensation is adjusted by shifting the aperture away from what's set on the gun.

Or you can use the manual guide number principle as described by SA above for setting flash exposure. Note that GN45 refers to ISO100. When bouncing, say from a white ceiling, estimate the distance from flash to ceiling plus ceiling to subject, then add one stop to account for absorbsion and diffusion from the ceiling. That won't be far off in an average room, though the gun's metering system will account for bouncing etc automatically.
 
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#9
I wouldn't connect directly to the PC socket of the canon if I were you.

The CL were much lower voltage than the 'huge' voltage CT range, but it's not worth it. Connect it via radio transmitter.

The CL hammerhead guns are superb. I have several left around the place. The CL4 also allowed manual settings of the gun (only to quarter power if memory serves) as well as 'auto thyristor' settings, and were very consistent in exposure.
 
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