1. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Hi folks,

    I've been doing a little bit of reading up about taking shots of water/waterfalls/moving water, and it looks like, unless I am getting out and taking the shots as the light is fading, i'm going to need an ND filter.

    I came across a web page recommending getting a 3 stop one and a 6 stop one, thoughts being that I have plenty of options covered using them singularly and also, then can stack them for brighter times etc

    So, just after others thoughts on this and also recommendations for particular ones to look at?

    I have a Canon 5D mkIII and a 24-70 f/2.8l mkII lens

    Many thanks in advance
     
  2. Tom Green

    Tom Green

    Messages:
    1,658
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    ND filters are brilliant in my opinion. Looks like you have some top class kit so if you're looking to spend to get the best filters, Lee and Hitech Firecrest are renowned for quality among others

    Also, a CPL can be enough to blur water I find in most situations.
     
  3. snerkler

    snerkler

    Messages:
    12,757
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Depends on budget. If you've got cash to splash then Lee or Hitech Firecrest are really good. More budget friendly options are ones like SRB, Hoya, Zomei, Cokin etc.
     
  4. trevjm

    trevjm

    Messages:
    448
    Name:
    Trev
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Nisi are getting great reviews for their filters. At a decent price too. Worth having a look at the reviews.
     
  5. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Thanks all, for your replies. I'll take a looky at all recommendations

    So, is it best to get something like a 3 and a 6 so I have stocking options, rather than just buying something like a 9?

    Cheers
     
  6. PaulButler

    PaulButler

    Messages:
    3,364
    Name:
    Paul
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Yes, getting a 3 stop and a 6 stop offers you flexibility. Agree with Tom above about the CPL too.
     
  7. holty

    holty

    Messages:
    4,726
    Edit My Images:
    No
    get a 10 stop that will cover all the bases
     
  8. woof woof

    woof woof

    Messages:
    18,093
    Name:
    Alan
    Edit My Images:
    No
    I can't bring myself to take a silky water shot. Sorry :D
     
    keeweeman and realspeed like this.
  9. goinggreynow

    goinggreynow

    Messages:
    536
    Edit My Images:
    No
    I have a 3 stop and 5 stop and use them mainly for motor racing!!
     
  10. stevelmx5

    stevelmx5

    Messages:
    8,975
    Name:
    Steve
    Edit My Images:
    No
    It won’t do you much good at dusk unless you want to stay for the night!

    I’d generally recommend a selection of filters such as, 2, 4 and 6 stop so they can be stacked it used individually as required.
     
  11. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Many thanks to all for your advice - all very much appreciated

    I'm going to look at a cheap ND set to start with, just to get me going and then save for the more expensive kit when I know what i'm doing and know more what's needed for each situation with the kit I have

    Very impressed with this helpful forum
     
    stevelmx5 likes this.
  12. HarveyM

    HarveyM

    Messages:
    370
    Edit My Images:
    No
    I bought a really cheap set of no name ND and variable ND filters from Amazon and the variables aren't too bad, but the full ND filters give terrible results, a muddy sludge cast on the image, I replaced them with a set of secondhand Hitech NDs and these are fine
     
    IanD likes this.
  13. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Now you've thrown me Harvey. Was just looking on Amazon at exactly those types - might have to go to at least Hoya quality
     
  14. stevelmx5

    stevelmx5

    Messages:
    8,975
    Name:
    Steve
    Edit My Images:
    No
    I’ve always used Kood/Cokin for my NDs and CPL with no issues. I’ve got a couple of cheaper brand variable NDs that I used when away on holiday a few times which were fine too when I didn’t want to carry a full set around.
     
  15. snerkler

    snerkler

    Messages:
    12,757
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Cheap ND's have bad colour cast. The cheapest 10 stop I found with colour cast that was 'manageable' (by this I mean easily fixed in PP) were the zomei. However, I've since upgraded to the hitch firecrest and colour cast is absolutely minimal (longest exposure I've done is 2mins 30s IIRC).
     
  16. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I've noticed a couple of the posters mentioning variable ND filters. I've seen plenty of mention of getting say a 3 stop one and a 10 stop one to cover various situations, so how does a variable one work.

    I've seen them on B&H Photo (although i'm sure I can get them in the UK), but how do you use one and why would you not just buy one of these in the first place instead of lots of different ones?

    Thanks all
     
  17. stevelmx5

    stevelmx5

    Messages:
    8,975
    Name:
    Steve
    Edit My Images:
    No
    A variable ND is basically two circular polarisers back to back in a filter ring. When you turn the front element, the ND effect increases up to the maximum point. They're generally cheaper than equivalent 10 stoppers etc so are probably made to a cheaper price point on the whole. Also, if you're shooting with an ultrawide you will see an X shape at the highest level on skies etc due to the width of field of view. If you're aware of it and wind it back it a bit it will go away but it's a limitation.

    As I said though, I took one away with me on our last holiday when I was shooting with my Olympus Pen FT (half frame film, not M4/3rds!) with a 38/1.8 lens and limited shutter speeds so I could shoot in bright daylight.
     
  18. Altea

    Altea

    Messages:
    33
    Name:
    Mathew
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    What did the original poster decide in the end? I find myself in a similar situation.
     
  19. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Altea likes this.
  20. JohnC6

    JohnC6

    Messages:
    3,446
    Name:
    John
    Edit My Images:
    Yes

    Spot on,Steve. I have a B&W 10-stop and you need to take sandwiches and a flask whilst waiting...lol. Just before Christmas I bought their 6-stop. Seems a good halfway house. There's a place for the 10-stop and I've very good reults but on the one occasion I used the 6-stop it did a good job. I read thst the 10-stop is good for the sea and the 6-stop for clouds.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2018
    stevelmx5 likes this.
  21. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Thought i'd bump this up and ask some more advice please

    I'm watching more and more videos and seeing most photographers clipping an adapter on then slotting their filters in, rather than using threaded ones.

    I've not exactly found it a pain with my cheaper screw-in ones, but wondering if their is much more benefit and ease of use, from getting a clip-on adapter and the relevant filters?

    Also, I know there's the concept of buy cheap, buy twice, so do I bite the bullet if I go down this route, and spend big bucks on a nice set, being that quality would be much better, and because of this, if I were to ever get rid, they'd hold their price?

    And finally (for now), do the adapters come in one size fits all for ranges of lenses (I have 77mm & 82mm ones) or do you have to get one per lens size?

    Thanks all
     
  22. GreenNinja67

    GreenNinja67

    Messages:
    3,515
    Name:
    Terry
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    You buy the adaptor ring to suit your lens' filter thread.

    So you only have to buy 2 adaptor rings in your case, not 2 sets of filters.


    I've used Hitech Firecrest holder and CPL and found it superb.

    I may sell it soon as I've gone to M43 and don't need 100mm filters
     
  23. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Cheers Terry, so it's the adapter ring that clips on to your lens and then you slot the different 100mm (I assume) filters into the adapter rings?
     
  24. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Blimey, just watched a video on the ones you have - it's like putting meccano together - by the time you've screwed on the adapter and then attached everything, you'll have missed the blue hour
     
  25. PaulButler

    PaulButler

    Messages:
    3,364
    Name:
    Paul
    Edit My Images:
    No
    hehe it may seem like that but it doesn't take long (at least with the Lee system). Attach the adapter ring to the filter and the holder just clips onto it. (you don't dismantle the holder each time btw - just in case that's what you were thinking).
     
  26. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Cheers Paul, so what's the reason for the adapter ring attachng to the filter? I thought that the holder would clip directly on to the sides/end of the lens, then the filters would drop into the holder.

    Not sure why there's a need for a screw-on filter?
     
  27. PaulButler

    PaulButler

    Messages:
    3,364
    Name:
    Paul
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Sorry Ian, trying to multi task - I missed a word out ... I meant to say attach the adapter ring to the filter thread on the lens and then clip the holder to the adapter ... (my excuse was I was doing a very boring repetitive task at work - and I'm sticking to it ;))
     
  28. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Ah right, no probs Paul. So why the adapter ring? Apologies if i'm asking a dim question but I'm not seeing why you wouldn't just clip the holder directly over your lens. Just seems that there's one extra bit for no reason?
     
  29. PaulButler

    PaulButler

    Messages:
    3,364
    Name:
    Paul
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Not a daft question at all ... lenses have different filter ring sizes, for example your 16-35 may have a 77mm size but my 35 has a 58mm - so you would need either some way to make the holder fit varying sized lenses or multiple holders. With relatively cheap adapter rings, one holder fits all (well, not quite, the bulbous lenses like Nikon 14-24 need a different beast but ...). Using this method the holder can be made relatively robustly, the adapter rings are metal (at in the Lee system) so everything last a fair while.

    Once you see it, it all makes sense (honest).
     
  30. PaulButler

    PaulButler

    Messages:
    3,364
    Name:
    Paul
    Edit My Images:
    No
  31. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Thanks for taking the time with a newbie mate - i'll have a looky at the video now
     
  32. LeeRatters

    LeeRatters

    Messages:
    800
    Name:
    Lee
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I have tried screw in 10 stop ND's from B+W & Haida - I have found the Haida to be better quality but the B+W one is a good few years old now. They may well have changed there manufacturing process I suppose.....

    I have also found my old 85mm square ND Grad filters as I have been getting back into landscape again. I have a Kood 0.6 SE & a Hitech 0.6 HE - The Hitech certainly has a magenta cast to it compared with the Kood!!!

    I'm wondering now whether to pick up a Kood hard edge filter......?!?
     
  33. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I have a screw in Haida 6 stop at the mo.

    I know a proper set up might be a good investment but not sure if I can justify a full set of filters like a Lee Little and Big Stoppers etc
     
  34. PaulButler

    PaulButler

    Messages:
    3,364
    Name:
    Paul
    Edit My Images:
    No
    tbh, I'd add the big and little stoppers as the last item. I rarely use mine. The two and three stop NDs get a lot of use as does the circular polariser. The other filters I use regularly are the ND grads with a 2 & 3 stop hard edge being used more than the soft edged versions. If I could only have three filters it would be a 2 & 3 stop ND and the circular polariser, but I do like using the grads ;)
     
    IanD likes this.
  35. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Thanks Paul- nice sound advice
     
  36. LeeRatters

    LeeRatters

    Messages:
    800
    Name:
    Lee
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I think you will get away with an 85mm modular filter kit IF you don't use all three slots ;) That makes things slightly cheaper - But it doesn't future proof you if you ever go wider than 24mm.

    I have a CPL, ND0.9, ND3.0 (all screw in) & ND grad 0.6 in hard & soft edge. I also have the front accessory ring & 95mm CPL too. That's more than enough really.....
     
  37. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    My lens are 77mm and 82mm and would be going as wide as 16mm
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
  38. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    So, i'm starting to sway towards ND filters that slot in to the holder. I can now see the benefit of them over screw in ones and going to work on getting the set up.

    I don't think I can run to the real high-end kit as it's fair chunk of money, so, can a few of you very helpful folk steer me towards what I need to get me kitted out, and maybe some brands that will be decent.

    I think I need:
    77mm and an 82mm adapter rings although i'm still not sure why though - are these purely for some sort of extension away from the lens to be able to clip the holder on to? Or are they just purely for attaching a poloaring filter to?

    Then obviously I need a holder - I assume it's best to get one that holds 100mm slot-in filters? This will then be the right size to attach to the 77mm and the 82mm adapter rings? I can see they are either spring-loaded or screw-tight - I guess the one that holds 100mm filters can screw/spring down to less than 77mm for enough tension?

    And then to filters - I know everyone will say buy cheap, buy twice, but are there some decent mid range ones out there that would get good results? Also, if say I bought a 'Joe Bloggs' branded holder, would it then hold different companies filters, ie can I mix and match, or is it best to buy all from one brand?

    And finally, just general advice - ND filters or ND Grad Filters or both (eventually)

    Apologies for so many questions but just trying to get this all right

    Thanks all
     
  39. woof woof

    woof woof

    Messages:
    18,093
    Name:
    Alan
    Edit My Images:
    No
    The ring fits on your lens and allows you to mount the holder.

    Maybe it'd be a good idea to buy a ring for your largest diameter lens and just get step up rings for your smaller diameter lenses. The reason I suggest this is because the filter holder rings are normally more expensive whereas step up rings are normally a lot cheaper.

    Personally I haven't used a filter for a loooong time and then it was only ND's to drop the shutter speed. I found graduated filters next to useless as I rarely take pictures that suit them... and don't even need them for seascape sunsets YMMV.... I also have a few special effects filters but I can't remember the last time I used them.

    I do think there's a new toy danger with filters and filter kits, I suspect people buy them and then look for a use and later end up putting them in a drawer. IMO they're of limited use but you might find them indispensable.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  40. IanD

    IanD

    Messages:
    768
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Good shout (possibly) thanks Alan, with the step-up ring.

    I do have enough interest to use the ND filters, I think. Would be great to have them in my bag too, for holidays, trips away etc so I should get use of them.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice