Beginner New to photography and absolutely overwhelmed with all the info available.

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1
Name
Charu
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#1
Hi,
As the title says, I'm new to photography and totally clueless about which direction to go. Theres so much information available its overwhelming and confusing. What should be my first step? How to figure out if I'm meant for photography? Should I buy courses online? Please help, guys.
 

wack61

I've got an itchy hatch
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7,609
Name
Darren
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#2
All you need to start is a camera, have you got one , a course might get you out of the house if it's not internet based but there's more information now that there ever has been.

You'll get recommendations for kit but the best camera is the one you have with you even if it's your phone.

I had and loved the Fuji X100 range , they stated with x100 then the S ,T , F
If you want to shoot street or landscape they're perfect but limited to the fixed lens
 
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89
Name
Paul
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#3
I remember when I first started back in the film only days there were only books/magazines, a few limited courses and Camera Clubs for information, today the internet is full of free information and advice, you could do worse than dropping in on a YouTuber called Mike Browne, look for his early stuff where he shares loads of good advice on beginner stuff like the basics of exposure, composition lens use etc. Don't be afraid to get a cheap camera in the beginning plenty of used ones around that will not break the bank and if you find photography is not for you then you can resell without too much loss. Don't worry about high megapixel count or super fast AF for now but try to get a camera that has interchangeable lenses that you can add to if you get more into it and has the ability to shoot program, aperture priority and manual modes. Start with a single lens most come with kit zooms but I'd advise trying to get one with a fixed focal length lens (Prime Lens) either 35mm or 50mm (or equivalent 23mm/35mm for APSC 17/25 for M4/3rds) at first you may need to buy body and lens separately. As for brand of camera, there are no real bad cameras made these days any brand will have entry level its really just about how you get on with the ergonomics of the particular brand. Above all don't overspend for features you don't need buying cheap used in the beginning will mean you have more money to travel and use your camera. Good luck and good shooting.
 
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1,079
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#4
As you seem unsure if photography is for you I think you should take any camera you have currently or can borrow and go take loads of photos. Take photos of landscapes, portraits, street etc and see if you enjoy it. If you do and theres a particular thing you like to photograph then think about buying a camera and lenses because then you can gear your choice towards the types of photography you'll be wanting to do. It's very expensive to get into especially if you dont know what type of photography you want to do. Try lots of things before buying.

In terms of learning you can just go on YouTube and look for videos for free as theres plenty out there for you to look at. Read your camera manual and understand what each setting/function does. You'll soon be on your way.

Enjoy.
 
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1,184
Name
Oleg
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#5
What should be my first step?
It's easy as 1 2 3.
First of all you have to decide what kind of genre you like.
Second thing is to find some source where is a lot of perfect photos of that genre.
And finally, try to replicate their photos.
Your vision will has come over time.
 
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743
Name
Col
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#6
if you already have a camera what are the other things you enjoy doing? For example do you like hill walking, if so then landscapes could be a good direction to go in and are a nice way to learn how to use the camera, some of the techniques and about light, exposure/depth of field etc and all with the added bonus that the mountains won't run away from you so you can take as long as you need. If you are very people orientated then portraiture/events may end up being your thing but those have other pressures attached to them (more in the events side of things where you don't want to miss things), but having a good foundation in exposure, lighting setups etc are all very important to get results you will be happy with. Don't worry about creating your own style for now, get some of the fundamentals in place and understanding technique and kit before you worry about that side of things.

If you are in need of buying a camera then mirrorless is the way to go now, find the one that fits your budget and needs (and feels right in the hand as comfort matters) and go with that. Pixel wise they will generally all do a good job now so don't get bogged down in those numbers, look more at things like iso performance, focussing and ergonomics.
 
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9,194
Name
Andrew Cliffe
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#7
Photography can be a wonderfully rewarding hobby, frustrating at times, but it is a hobby which has to have some dedication to get the best from it. Unlike film days where there was a financial cost to every photograph taken, digital is liberating as you can experiment much more freely.

The only think to really learn is how the relationships between shutter speed, aperture and ISO (sensitivity to light) interact. This is now commonly called the exposure triangle.

There are plenty of good books on the subject to get you started, or youtube channels is that method of learning is preferred. I wouldn't necessarily suggest subscribing to courses just yet.
 
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6,528
Name
Bazza
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#8
first of all decide what you want to photograph mainly, be it portraits-landscape- architecture- wildlife macro etc. Each brings it own challenges and the more you go into it the more there is to learn. So decide on your main interest and concentrate on that with the rest as an added bonus. Get to "Know" your camera and which lens suits your main interest.

The best way to learn is to practise and see where you went wrong, we have all taken bad photos at one time or another and still do ;). I would say start out by "looking" at what you want to photograph and not just seeing it.

Example

You could start out in this respect at looking at a cup. Ask yourself how many ways can I photograph it? ie from the side -from the top -from looking at the inside- from it lying on its side - from showing or not the handle- can I light it in a different way- can I photograph it in a different place to make it look better. Now you are actually looking at the cup and not just seeing it. So get use to actually looking is a big step forward
 
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22,957
Name
Richard
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#9
I remember when I first started back in the film only days there were only books/magazines, a few limited courses and Camera Clubs for information, today the internet is full of free information and advice, you could do worse than dropping in on a YouTuber called Mike Browne, look for his early stuff where he shares loads of good advice on beginner stuff like the basics of exposure, composition lens use etc. Don't be afraid to get a cheap camera in the beginning plenty of used ones around that will not break the bank and if you find photography is not for you then you can resell without too much loss. Don't worry about high megapixel count or super fast AF for now but try to get a camera that has interchangeable lenses that you can add to if you get more into it and has the ability to shoot program, aperture priority and manual modes. Start with a single lens most come with kit zooms but I'd advise trying to get one with a fixed focal length lens (Prime Lens) either 35mm or 50mm (or equivalent 23mm/35mm for APSC 17/25 for M4/3rds) at first you may need to buy body and lens separately. As for brand of camera, there are no real bad cameras made these days any brand will have entry level its really just about how you get on with the ergonomics of the particular brand. Above all don't overspend for features you don't need buying cheap used in the beginning will mean you have more money to travel and use your camera. Good luck and good shooting.
(y) for Mike Browne https://www.youtube.com/user/photoexposed/featured
 
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3,123
Name
Andy
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#10
Yes, there's a huge amount of information available, but you don't have to read/watch it all at once. Take your time - photography has many genres, many techniques, and more equipment than you can ever imagine.

My recommendation is to start simple. You probably won't know what genre you want to focus on, or what style. It's a bit like picking up a paint brush for the first time, what do you paint, why, how etc, but with many more options.

So to begin with, just start taking pictures. It doesn't matter what of. Take a few pictures every day, and see what you like. As you carry on, you'll start to understand more about it, and what you like and don't like. You'll probably change your mind loads of times. Don't worry - there's no "right" answer. Don't try to please anyone but yourself.

Welcome to an amazing hobby (that often gets somewhat out of hand!)
 
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