Review nikon d300s v d700 v d3s.

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Dave Pickett
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#2
mmm maybe Full frame isnt as mucha benefit.......must say when I get a decent image that doesnt need cropping on the D90 its hard to fault the quality or
 
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symondhelly

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I think the D300 actually occupies a different market to that of the D700 and the D3, whereas IMO the D3 and D700 are in direct competition with each other.

I've heard so many wildlife 'togs saying they'll stick with the D300 due to the APS-C sensor, they want the crop factor, and I think that is a valid consideration for them, and for sports shooters too.

The D700 on the other hand is a stripped down (barely) version of the D3, and I am not quite sure what Nikon where trying to accomplish with releasing it that early, apart from proving they could put all this amazing technology into such a small space...
 

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For me, the choice of the D700 versus an APS-C sensor model was down to pretty much one thing, noise performance.

It's like always having a couple of extra stops to play with.
 
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scottthehat
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scott
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For me, the choice of the D700 versus an APS-C sensor model was down to pretty much one thing, noise performance.

It's like always having a couple of extra stops to play with.
yes i agree but its also nice to have the extra reach. both have there + points, and i would still have a d700 in a blink of an eye.:D
 
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Andy
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#11
exactly and the test is on static subjects under controlled lighting. Hardly a true test of the D3S or D3OO
 
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Andy
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#14
It is indeed :D i cant wait for mine :p I have seen the D300 at games but only as a remote camera behind the goals
 
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eloise cox
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#15
Well Very nice review you have share here.The D700 is a Full Frame Sensor.
What that means for you is you will need to buy new lesnses if you currently own only DX lenses.

The D700 has a fantastic ISO range, this is only important if you do alot of work in low light enviroments.

As well the D300 is still classed as a Consumer level Camera while the D700 is in the pro class.
If you can have both go for it, the D300 is a great backup to the D700
 
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#16
i never understand the argument of cropped formats getting more reach. A full frame would see the cropped image within its view, granted you would have to crop, but it does have its benefits over noise handling and pixel vs pixel image quality.
 
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#19
As well the D300 is still classed as a Consumer level Camera while the D700 is in the pro class.

The only real difference between the 300s and the 700 is the sensor size and a bigger sensor on it's own doesn't make for a "pro" camera. Both are consumer (or "prosumer" as they sometimes get tagged) cameras, regardless of the higher price of the D700.
 
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Steve
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#20
The only real difference between the 300s and the 700 is the sensor size and a bigger sensor on it's own doesn't make for a "pro" camera. Both are consumer (or "prosumer" as they sometimes get tagged) cameras, regardless of the higher price of the D700.

Not that I want to start anything but after looking at Nikons site Nikon are classing them as "professional" as in the list :shrug: ---> Nikon proffessional dslr
 
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Steve
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#22
I thought that a FF camera was classed as a "professional" camera... :confused:
 
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Dean
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#23
A professional camera is a camera a professional uses. Simple as that innit.
 
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#24
An interesting comparative review.

It was good to see the three side by side, in a relatively real world situation. The model is going to be moving around after all, and maybe changing clothes, but her face, and more specifically her eyes didn't change. Taking pictures of a person rather than still objects or test charts gives more information on how they compare imho. There may have been slight changes of the lighting coverage, but like I said, it was a living moving subject rather than a test chart.

I would have expected the D700 and D3 to render images the same way, but that was not what had been observed. :cautious: And even though I have a D300S I wouldn't have expected it do come out so well. It would have been interesting to see the D3X in there too, but it would have give the test a different point for many readers.

Obviously this was comparing the cameras in a certain situation, and the different cameras may excel in different situations and subject matter. but they are all 12Mp sensors at heart, so I think the test is a valid one.

In certain situations the cameras can do a similar job, but then most people take images in a number of situations, and would buy the camera that best met their needs. Obviously budget comes into the equation as well for most people too. ;) But it was good to see how they compare.



The D300(S) is a professional spec camera, just with an APS-C sensor. Nikon themselves consider it to be a Pro camera as has been said. The 7D is Canon's Pro cropped sensor camera.
 
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#25
I thought that a FF camera was classed as a "professional" camera... :confused:
They may be, but prior to the release of the D3 Nikon didn't have a FF camera, but they had a Pro range of cameras. ;)

A professional camera is a camera a professional uses. Simple as that innit.
I think the design and spec determine whether the camera is a Pro one, and obviously how a manufacturer markets the camera.

That somebody uses a camera in a Pro situation does not make it a Pro camera. A camera used by a Pro yes, a Pro camera? no. ;)
 
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#26
I think the design and spec determine whether the camera is a Pro one, and obviously how a manufacturer markets the camera.
That, essentially is it in a nutshell. My original point though was that the addition of an FF sensor to a D300 body doesn't elevate the D700 into a different class of camera.
 
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