Nikon D800......

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Immo
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Hi, Rallye Trifels 2019, Nikon D800 - Nikkor 4/70-200. Nothing to report, faultless performance (of the camera ( ;) ) ) :


D80_6671-n70c-tp.jpg


How time flies ... I have enjoyed my D800 for three years now ---
 
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I bought my Nikon D800 new way back on the 28 march 2009 from Jessops in Cannock as it was then. The cost new was £1099. Shutter count is now a heady 11,197 actuations
 
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Hi, I bought mine used after being frustrated of my SONY A7R2's AF performance. I forgot how much I paid ... --- A good buy !
 
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Dropped mine and had it repaired on insurance. Good reason to get the D810, even "er indoors" didn't mind which surprised me. It came back better than new, even the reds in a photo looked the right colour which I struggled with before
 
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Took a little drive through Glen Etive on Friday. Was up there with a pal and it wasn't really a photography trip but couldn't really help myself when I saw the spring colours everywhere. This was in the middle of the day so light a little harsh but the colour of the valley was fantastic. I've only ever really been there in winter before and hadn't really appreciated just how glorious it would look in full bloom.

Glen Etive in Springtime
by G.A.D, on Flickr
Indeed - the area looks at its best from Mid May to Early November. Unless there is a lot of snow over the darker months the area isn't nearly as attractive.

Here's the D800 with the 14-24 attached working hard at the Torren Lochan

_DSC1726
by Stephen Taylor, on Flickr


_DSC1730
by Stephen Taylor, on Flickr

Those colours...drool :D
 
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sorry looking at the D300 receipt. I normally keep all receipts but going thru 2 box files there is a lot of paperwork in them

Found it will post in a short time




See I knew I had it somewhere. Oh that david busch book is well worth getting. i have the D810 version. That email address was where I used to live,no longer exists. moved5 years ago



I found out a lot more about this D810 than the official Nikon version
 
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sorry looking at the D300 receipt. I normally keep all receipts but going thru 2 box files there is a lot of paperwork in them
Heck of a deal if it had been a d800. Regardless, amazing how much time has passed this these were released. I still think them as new tech!
 
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. I still think them as new tech!
Honestly they were so far ahead of their time that they still more than hold their own today. Nothing remotely came close to the D800 for years for resolution, and some only came close on dynamic range. Sure AF got better (it's still decent though) and dynamic range only slightly better in the last 7 years but many working photographers still use them and use them well.

For what I do the only 35mm format cameras that are better than the D800 are the D810 (just), the D850, Z7 and the A7RII and A7RIII from a sensor resolution and dynamic range point of view. There's a lot of newer 35mm format bodies that cost more that I'd rather not have over a D800 ( eg a 5d4, 5d3, Z6, D750, A9) etc etc.

The only gripe I have with the D800 is the hand grip being shallower than the D810. The D810 is just an improved D800 and I really like them both. Strangely I find the D810 less useful at higher ISO than the D800 but it's slightly cleaner at base ISO.

The D800 was such an insanely good camera that it has stood the test of time almost like no other.
 
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i have the D300 (book photo taken with it) The D800 and the improved D810 . I keep the d300 as I have a wide angle lens for it Nikon 12-24 f1:4 G ED DX. The D800 is now my back up camera
 
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Iv not long gone from olympus mft equipment to a nikon d810, iv got to say it blows me away. I dread to think what a D850 is like because I find the 810 simply fantastic.
 
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Honestly they were so far ahead of their time that they still more than hold their own today. Nothing remotely came close to the D800 for years for resolution, and some only came close on dynamic range. Sure AF got better (it's still decent though) and dynamic range only slightly better in the last 7 years but many working photographers still use them and use them well.

For what I do the only 35mm format cameras that are better than the D800 are the D810 (just), the D850, Z7 and the A7RII and A7RIII from a sensor resolution and dynamic range point of view. There's a lot of newer 35mm format bodies that cost more that I'd rather not have over a D800 ( eg a 5d4, 5d3, Z6, D750, A9) etc etc.

The only gripe I have with the D800 is the hand grip being shallower than the D810. The D810 is just an improved D800 and I really like them both. Strangely I find the D810 less useful at higher ISO than the D800 but it's slightly cleaner at base ISO.

The D800 was such an insanely good camera that it has stood the test of time almost like no other.
I would agree here, I did adore the D800E when I owned it, at least for the first couple of year. But the weight of the overall kit bogged me down as I had back surgery and the camera bag was often hitting 10kg when I wanted to take all my lenses out for a spin. I wouldn't go back to using a D800 only, but I'd never say no to having one on side. I remember shooting gigs with it at 10K ISO and the files barely needed any NR in post, it was very good for low light.

On prices, I paid €3200 for mine when it was first released, the single most expensive thing I have ever bought I think. It was over 5K total as I bought it with the 24-70 2.8 and a 50 1.8. I wouldn't pay anything close to that for a camera now, my whole current kit is barely worth 2K I'd say
 
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... But the weight of the overall kit bogged me down as I had back surgery and the camera bag was often hitting 10kg when I wanted to take all my lenses out for a spin. I wouldn't go back to using a D800 only, but I'd never say no to having one on side. I remember shooting gigs with it at 10K ISO and the files barely needed any NR in post, it was very good for low light.
Hi, I am happy with the D800, the way I use it. I carry it around very rarely, and if so, no more than an hour. Typically, I sit by the roadside, taking pictures of cars in motion.

Cars come one in 2 or 3 minutes. In between, the D800 rests in my lap.

I have two "pocket cameras", a SONY R7R2, I use when travelling, or for static cars, and a Leica M9, I use for special occasions, or when I feel the need for the feeling of its
handling.

Presently, I do not see other cameras coming my way. I do not like the trend of the new, big mirrorless (Nikon, Canon, Panasonic, Sigma), with big lenses.

So, I simply use what I have ...
 
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Spent the last few weeks deciding what camera to replace my D800 with and it became obvious that by far the best bang for my buck was another D800. Still amazed at the quality of the files and for not much more than £600 for a low mileage minter, it's a bargain. A7R is similar price but I found it much trickier to get tack sharp photo with the A7R than the D800 which hardly ever fails.
 
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Spent the last few weeks deciding what camera to replace my D800 with and it became obvious that by far the best bang for my buck was another D800. Still amazed at the quality of the files and for not much more than £600 for a low mileage minter, it's a bargain. A7R is similar price but I found it much trickier get tack sharp photo with the A7R than the D800 which hardly ever fails.
Hi, I have a SONY A7 and an A7R2. I bought a D800 with the Nikkor 4/70-200 (both used) for cars in action, because I was dissatisfied with SONY AF performance.

The D800 stays with me, maybe I 'll buy a D850, when its successor comes, and prices go down ... ---
 
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Some really nice photos on this thread, I have a problem
I moved from olympus to a nikon d810 and have just been on holiday with it, to say I'm disappointed is a understatement out of a few hundred photographs I think there are 2 that I'm happy with. Poor focus and shake are my biggest issues. I can only put it down to a recent system change but can't help feeling a bit of regret. Any one care to say nice things to me while I beat myself up
 
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Damo . You are not the only one who had problems at the beginning with the Nikon D810. What I discovered it is not like most other Nikons with AA filters, with the filters removed it is a far more precision camera. It doesn't tolerate mistakes ie camera shake or photographers error, but get it right and it is fantastic. Even the body position if unbalanced can cause camera shake, for me it was a complete new learning curve. Elbows in tight to the body helps steady the D810 is one trick I learnt as well as breath control

It took me some considerable time to get used to keeping the camera still with a VR or non VR lens attached. So I can well understand your frustration. I have found using a Nikon MB D12 grip with the added weight helps stop camera shake.
In actual fact I spent quite a time in my back garden focusing on a brick wall to train myself in holding the camera steady. have to say it did improve how still I could hold it, maybe try giving it a go.

You also need pro lenses like the Nikon afs 24-70 f2.8 G or the af-s 70-200 f2.8 G to name a couple. Even then I found fine tuning the lenses to camera or visa versa helped a lot. ( I use spyderlensCal). I did get a grey card to use as an extra setting on the camera and in the editing suit
I would even go as far as saying in a lot of circumstances a remote shutter release makes a difference.
I came up first with a Nikon D70s- to D200-D300- D800 to the D810 and it surprised me how different it was even to the D800.

My biggest problem is not checking all the setting first, even on the top screen. There are also some useful tips on youtube

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNUH5dCaLMU&t=509s
and

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zwIWhDcTEY&t=198s


Just checked my own advice


unedited apart from from RAW to Jpeg to post on here
 
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Thank you reelspeed, I'll be spending a lot more time practicing before I give up
it will pay off believe me. Just think more of how your taking the shot as well as the photo itself

. I just posted our dog and used the elbows tight to the chest is a great tip. Oh and stay sober as well
 
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One from a trip out the other night. One of those evenings where I just wanted to get out and about and get some calm and fresh air therapy. Not the most promising weather and the one location I had in mind turned out to be no good so I just drove around a bit and almost returned home before I stumbled across this field.

_ND82646.jpg
by G.A.D, on Flickr
 
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Some really nice photos on this thread, I have a problem
I moved from olympus to a nikon d810 and have just been on holiday with it, to say I'm disappointed is a understatement out of a few hundred photographs I think there are 2 that I'm happy with. Poor focus and shake are my biggest issues. I can only put it down to a recent system change but can't help feeling a bit of regret. Any one care to say nice things to me while I beat myself up
I use an Olympus E-M5ii alongside my D800 so I'm kind of aware of the challenges of each. First thing that springs to mind is that I know on the Olympus I can be super relaxed about shutter speed unless subject is moving because the IBIS system just makes everything ridiculously easy. The D800 is the total opposite (probably worse the D810 too as the mirror/shutter is more violent). I tend to double the old rule of thumb about hand holding speeds so on a 50mm lens, I'd be looking for 1/100 or more if possible.

Focus can be a multitude of things. What method/mode are you generally using on the D810?

The mirror-less systems have their own foibles but with focus being acquired on the sensor itself, they are normally super accurate. The D810, like all DSLR's relies on an assumption about focus sensor being same distance from sensor once bounced off the mirror. At least when shooting through the VF. It can be wrong and as @realspeed says, sometimes they need some calibration. But before you spend too much time and money on this, just try a few simple tests where you focus using live view and then compare to focus using the VF. If the VF is consistently softer, you might have a calibration issue to work through. Usually, I just dial in some adjustments, check the images of each and then start to fine tune it. It might help.
 
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I have found the shutter slap more violent in the D800. The D810 is a lot "smoother". However change both over to quiet mode and shutter slap is hardly noticable and that is what I use and recommend, use quiet mode all the time.
 
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I have found the shutter slap more violent in the D800. The D810 is a lot "smoother". However change both over to quiet mode and shutter slap is hardly noticable and that is what I use and recommend, use quiet mode all the time.
Yep, that helps certainly. Though a pain if you should any action as that delay often results in missing 'that' moment. Good tool to have when appropriate though.
 
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Hello folks, I have just taken delivery of a used D800 with a low shutter count (about 6800). I have only managed to take a handful of images so far but I'm suitably impressed. Here's one of our dog, Molly, making the most of the shade in the back garden this afternoon. More testing and practice to be done over the weekend :)

DSC_6655
 
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Fwiw I’ve been out and shot a couple more times with my d810 , mostly steam punks and found that I’m much happier with my hit rate . So I’ve come to the decision that I’m not exposing correctly for landscapes but when shooting people with a flash on board much better , it appears that the d810s much higher resolution is punishing my crap ness much more than my Olympus used to and obvs I don’t have a Evf anymore ( live view not withstanding ) , I know this camera is capable of breath taking images ( most likely they all are ) I just need to practice more .
Also can anyone explain to me why a burglar kicked my front door in and stole car/van keys cash and jewellery but walked twice past my camera ( obviously I’m glad ) while I was upstairs in the shower , I’m very puzzled by him leaving my camera .
 
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... Also can anyone explain to me why a burglar kicked my front door in and stole car/van keys cash and jewellery but walked twice past my camera ( obviously I’m glad ) while I was upstairs in the shower , I’m very puzzled by him leaving my camera .
Well, the D800 is not pocketable, making anyone carrying it more conspicuous, and being more easily remembered. - There must have been pros at work ... ---
 
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Hi Guys, I'm looking for some real world practical advice, I've just bought a D800 simply because it's the cheapest way to try a really high res camera (okay I could hire one but I like to own)
The internet is full of sage advice and warnings about using M/up and live view and even the timer to get the best results, but in truth that's not how I take my images, I hand hold everything so before I even get my hands on the D800 I'm starting to worry if I've done the right thing.

I currently use a D7200 and I have a Panasonic G9 with the Leica 12-60, both are really portable and I simply don't need a tripod and wouldn't want to carry one, so what'e the best way to use this beast on the hoof?
 
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Hi Guys, I'm looking for some real world practical advice, I've just bought a D800 simply because it's the cheapest way to try a really high res camera (okay I could hire one but I like to own)
The internet is full of sage advice and warnings about using M/up and live view and even the timer to get the best results, but in truth that's not how I take my images, I hand hold everything so before I even get my hands on the D800 I'm starting to worry if I've done the right thing.

I currently use a D7200 and I have a Panasonic G9 with the Leica 12-60, both are really portable and I simply don't need a tripod and wouldn't want to carry one, so what'e the best way to use this beast on the hoof?
You could always use a monopod, but justpix has the right idea. I've never had a problem not using a tripod and I'm a shaky old bugger.
 
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