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  1. Lyndsey

    Lyndsey

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    Found lots of these in the garden today - not something I've ever noticed before!

    I think it's a Ladybird cocoon - fascinating! :)


    DSC_7635.jpg
     
  2. Andy Johnson

    Andy Johnson

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    Andrew
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    Yes your right, and a nice shot of one too. :) But Pupae would be the correct term.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
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  3. Lyndsey

    Lyndsey

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    Thank you @Andy Johnson - there were about 15 that I could see at different stages... The ? younger ones reared up when I moved near them - a defence mechanism?
     
  4. Lyndsey

    Lyndsey

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    And a bit of info for those like me that didn't know the difference:

    A pupa is an insect in a stage of transformation; pupae is the plural of pupa; the pupa life stage is called the pupal stage;

    Chrysalis is the correct name to use for a moth pupa or a butterfly pupa; chrysalises is the plural of chrysalis;

    Cocoon is the name to use for the outer layer that protects a pupa or chrysalis during metamorphoses.

    When referring to insects in this transformative stage, it can be easy to simply refer to them as ‘cocoons’ if they indeed have such a protective coating.

    However this isn’t an entirely accurate description to use.

    It is not only better but also correct to use pupae if they are insects and you do not known the correct name for them or chrysalises if they are moths or butterflies.

    :)
     
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  5. Andy Johnson

    Andy Johnson

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    Couldn't have said it any better :)

    As you know Lady birds, adult and larvae rely on their colour for defence and a reminder of their toxicity but swallows and swifts are immune to their chemical compounds. Also if the colour warning doesnt work they can ooze out a foul liquid from their limbs which is called "Reflex bleeding" I don't know about the pupae's defence but perhaps those branches behind it also emit a fluid ??? something to google perhaps ?
     
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  6. Lyndsey

    Lyndsey

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  7. GardenersHelper

    GardenersHelper

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    Nice shot. I like the way you composed it.
     
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  8. Lyndsey

    Lyndsey

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  9. alfbranch

    alfbranch

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    Nice shot Lyndsey
     
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  10. Lyndsey

    Lyndsey

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