1. ian-83

    ian-83

    Messages:
    1,466
    Name:
    Ian
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I currently have a Panasonic G80 with a couple of lenses, reason I got it was I was looking into a smaller lighter camera for taking on long walks and holidays.

    I used it recently on holiday and spent so much time faffing over settings etc I didn't spend much time enjoying being off work and enjoying family time, wish I had taken my compact camera or used my phone.

    As for walking, that's gone down the pan as my other half has recently changed jobs so most weekends I look after the kids, while she is working. I do get time to go take photos mostly weekday evenings but don't tend to go too far from home.

    Due to the two main reasons of buying my camera and now fairly redundant I am temotem to switch back to a crop sensor dSLR. I had a Nikon D7000 before which I am tempted to get again. I am not fussed over the latest tech just having something I enjoy to use. Which also I have found with the G80 it's nice but feels a bit small and fiddly in my hands to use sometimes. I find a larger body more comfortable to hold.

    Anyone got any ideas? I think from reading back what I have put I have already made my mind up.
     
  2. Cagey75

    Cagey75

    Messages:
    9,431
    Name:
    Keith
    Edit My Images:
    No
    The G80 menus are probably the easiest I've used to date. Once you do get the hang of it, and have the camera set to your liking, you rarely even need to go near them. I got a new replacement one last week, took me 5 minutes to run through it and have it set exactly the same as my previous copy. From there I only use the menu to format the card or change a couple settings if I want to shoot some video. Otherwise I have the Fn buttons set to quick change the main controls I need.

    But .. if it's not for you, then it's not for you. I have actually been considering a change too, mainly because I had a lot of trouble with my G80, it's been to repairs twice in 7mths. They sent me out this brand new one and I wonder should I sell while I can call it new, and just try something else for a while. If I don't like it, it's not hard to come back. I was looking at the Canon 80D, with the option of getting one of their cheaper M bodies to have on side. I used to shoot Nikon, had 4 of their cameras, but tbh they bore me to tears now. I found them all so samey and bland in use. I had more fun when I switched to Fuji. I have never shot Canon and maybe that's a big reason I would go that way too.

    Another option is to get the battery grip for the G80, I had one for a while but sold it to fund a lens. It was the official Pany one so worth a few bob. I was sorry later, it felt really good, a bit like a mini D4, balanced it very nicely when using longer lenses. If I stick with I will be buying a third party one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
  3. Ste_S

    Ste_S

    Messages:
    352
    Edit My Images:
    No
    What settings are you faffing with ? With the tech in modern cameras they are point and shoots unless you're trying to achieve something specific. Very rare that I take any of my digital cameras out of Program mode.
     
  4. ian-83

    ian-83

    Messages:
    1,466
    Name:
    Ian
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    It's less the menus, which i find easy to navigate, more of the buttons themselves and the physical size of the camera I find an issue sometimes. I have all the function buttons setup to my preference and also the my menu setup to with most frequent used items in there. The small size and weight are also a bonus at times. I never liked any of the range finder style MFT camera's when I tried them in the shop they just felt so horrible to hold for me. Comparing the G80 size wise to a D7000 overall it's not as tall but its only like 16mm difference. I am not really a battery grip user but trying to try one before committing to a purchase isn't easy as no where local to me stocks such an item.
    I liked my Nikon's I had before but then i think back to what i was carrying around as it was about a 1kg more than what I carry now. Which then makes me undecided as to switch back. Image quality wise for my purposes both camera's have produced similar images with nothing much in difference I can physically see or care about.
    I had my G80 repaired too recently for a loose grip rubber, had it back about a week and it looks like it's possibly coming off again all ready.

    Settings wise I was too busy worrying about f-stops and ISO etc. looking back I should of really put it in auto mode and cracked on taking pictures. I just feel a bit like I spent more time playing with my camera then spending it on family time.

    I think this whole latest craze of new mirrorless full frame camera's has got me worrying if I have made a good choice. But then it does appear mirrorless is the future and maybe I just need to stick with my camera and learn it better and just enjoy taking photo's. I don't think whichever camera I have my results will automatically improve, instead my bank balance will just look the worse for it! And it'll be money spent with little to no gain,
     
  5. Cagey75

    Cagey75

    Messages:
    9,431
    Name:
    Keith
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Same here, the closest decent camera stores to me are in Dublin, and that's a 2hr round bus trip plus a fair amount of walking through the city just to try stuff out. I have done so, when it's a big purchase and I'm unsure, but it's a pain if it's just something like a grip or strap or even just a cheap lens. I buy most stuff online and depend on the reviews. I don't like RF style cameras either, and I do kind of wish the G80 was a tad bigger, my pinky does hang off the end but I use it to cushion the grip. Otherwise I love how solid it feels, and ergonomically, besides being that little bit short, I can't really fault it.

    On the repairs, the second time mine went back, it was an IBIS issue, it was acting erratic, they tried to tell me it was a lens issue [because they couldn't figure it out I'd bet] - after I told them that was BS, because I tried it with a bunch of lenses [I tried 2, that was enough for me, but I told them I tried loads] and also told them that I had emailed Panasonic about the issue [true] and got a response apologizing and asking for more details on the repair centre it was sent to [also true] ... suddenly I was offered a brand new replacement. If you have to send yours away again, demand same. No camera should ever need to be sent for repair twice within 6-7mths, even the first year.

    And even if you decide to switch, a new body will sell easier.

    Contact Panasonic UK about it. Here is what they replied to my complaint email:

    "Thank you for your e-mail.

    I am sorry to learn of the circumstances that have prompted you to contact our department.

    In response, can you please tell me what service centre performed the repairs on the camera?

    In a reply to this email, please attach a copy of the proof of purchase so I can investigate this further.

    Looking forward to your reply to provide further assistance.

    Kind Regards,

    John

    Customer Service Team
    Panasonic UK"

    This is the email I contacted:
    customercare.advisor@eu.panasonic.com
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
  6. ian-83

    ian-83

    Messages:
    1,466
    Name:
    Ian
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Where did yours go for repair? Was it DKAVS near Gatwick? I might send them an e-mail saying I am not happy with the replacement grip.
     
  7. Cagey75

    Cagey75

    Messages:
    9,431
    Name:
    Keith
    Edit My Images:
    No

    Mine was returned to Connscameras Dublin where I bought it, they sent it forward to the repair centre so I don't know which one it was tbh. I would chance emailing them, attach clear images of the grip to strengthen your complaint. Also tell them you will be contacting Panasonic direct because you feel the camera was below par from the off. The replacement I got is a newer copy, it came complete with the latest firmware pre-installed. Hopefully they improved QC since the earlier batches. I obviously don't have the older one to direct compare, but I feel like the grips are tougher, harder, less 'rubbery' than the first one.

    Your grip should look like this:

    g80grip.jpg

    Almost flush, no sagging or loosening. Feel around the grip for bubbles or soft spots, if you have those it's going to get worse over time, especially if any moisture gets in. It doesn't affect WR though, the grip is just that, for grip.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
  8. Ste_S

    Ste_S

    Messages:
    352
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Absolutely. Auto ISO and Program (or iAuto) is fine for most things. Ignore the old school hangover from film that says you need to shoot as manual as possible to be 'pro'.
    We buy cameras with computers in them, we might as well use them for the majority of the photography we do.
     
  9. Cagey75

    Cagey75

    Messages:
    9,431
    Name:
    Keith
    Edit My Images:
    No
    I've never used iAuto, I don't trust the camera enough, but I will use Auto ISO now and then. Any of the PASM modes are better than full auto.

    I mostly use M because it just suits me best, there's this weird stigma around here regarding that. Some seem to think those who prefer to use M mode are doing so to come across more experienced, this is complete BS. It's just another mode, it's one extra control. If you have the time to set up the shot M is always best IMHO. Whichever works best at the time. I would avoid iAuto though, it's just leaving too much to the camera, and cameras tend to veer toward pumping ISO before anything else when it's not necessary. Set a limit on your ISO, mine is at 1600, I don't like G80 files above it - personal preference. Once you're comfortable knowing the camera will spike it more often than not, even with exp.comp adjusting, then you can indeed fire away without having to worry.
     
  10. Ste_S

    Ste_S

    Messages:
    352
    Edit My Images:
    No
    It just baffles me that people spend thousands on cameras with computers, only to turn all the computers off to then get the same result the computers would of got
     
  11. Cagey75

    Cagey75

    Messages:
    9,431
    Name:
    Keith
    Edit My Images:
    No

    On the flip side of that, it baffles me why people buy cameras with tonnes of controls, only to switch them off and let the gear do all the work. Is this not why many prefer more on body physical controls? I don't like cameras without. Not my main camera at least, I don't mind having one on side set to all auto just for quick fire, ever ready shooting. There is no right or wrong, I just hate the stupid notion which only seems to happen on forums [in general, not picking at you btw], that using the full control of a camera is somehow deemed elitist, it really irritates me.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
  12. GreenNinja67

    GreenNinja67

    Messages:
    3,612
    Name:
    Terry
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    The control are there for precisely that, control.

    You can either use them or not.

    If you get results you're happy with while in full auto then fine.

    You try taking a shot in moonlight on P mode, or strongly backlit subjects.
     

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