1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Ladystrange

    Ladystrange

    Messages:
    99
    Name:
    Claire
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Hi! I was looking for some advice please. I found my dad's old Canon film camera, it's just a wee Sure Shot so no lenses or anything, but I fancy doing a wee project with it. I have 2 rolls of out of date B&W film I'm going to use (yes I know they may be beyond use but I've gotta try!!) What I'm wondering is how to get them developed or preferably converted to digital files when I'm done. Is this easy enough or do I need specialist equipment? Thanks guys!

    Sorry if this has been asked before!!
     
    futurelegend likes this.
  2. Downton Mini

    Downton Mini

    Messages:
    2,865
    Name:
    Mark
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I've used Filmdev recently (as have many members here) and have been more then happy with the results I've also used Photo Express on old out of date film
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  3. RaglanSurf

    RaglanSurf Official Forum Idiot 2013 & 2014

    Messages:
    9,827
    Name:
    Nick
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Ladystrange likes this.
  4. FujiLove

    FujiLove

    Messages:
    2,267
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Hi Claire - First off, have a look at the processing and editing section on this page: https://www.talkphotography.co.uk/t...ion-where-to-find-tutorials-resources.571044/

    A lot of people on here develop their film at home, but if you're just dipping your toe in the water you may be better sending it off for development. Having said that, it's an easy process at home, requires simple and cheap equipment and is lots of fun :)

    How old is the film? The general rule is to add a stop of extra exposure per decade. So for instance, you would set your meter to 200 for an ISO 400 film that expired in 2008.
     
    futurelegend and Ladystrange like this.
  5. Downton Mini

    Downton Mini

    Messages:
    2,865
    Name:
    Mark
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Thats handy to know thanks @FujiLove
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  6. mdjchat

    mdjchat

    Messages:
    284
    Name:
    Mathew
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    If you can set the speed of the film on your camera the general advice seems to be to overexpose the film by 1 stop for every 20 years past the expiry date. B&W film is pretty forgiving though so if you can't manually set the film speed it should still work.

    Filmdev are great. They offer mail order processing and will scan your film and then make the scans available to download online. I've only had small scans from them as they are suitable for using on the web. If I have any shots that are worth printing I can s an myself or get a local lab (peak imaging in Sheffield) to scan the selected negatives at a higher resolution.
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  7. FishyFish

    FishyFish

    Messages:
    1,910
    Name:
    Nige
    Edit My Images:
    No
    I second Mathew's comment above - overexpose B&W film by just one stop per two decades of expiry (or half-a-stop per decade if you'd prefer :) ).

    If the camera is a Sure Shot compact @Ladystrange then it's likely that you won't be able to set the film speed manually though as the camera will read the speed automatically from the DX coding marks on the film canister (although, if you fancy it, you can "hack" the DX coding marks to fool the camera into thinking it's a different rated film). Out of interest, how expired is the film and what is the ASA rating?
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  8. Ladystrange

    Ladystrange

    Messages:
    99
    Name:
    Claire
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    I cant remember the age of the film but will check when I get home. Yes @FishyFish it is a Sure Shot so I'm not sure what scope I'll have for manually setting it up but I'll give it a bash. I've no manual for it so it'll be good craic!!
    I have developed film in the past although a long time ago and as part of a group so I'm not sure I'd be confident enough to try it myself.

    Thank you all so much for the warm welcome and the great advice. I'll let you know what the age is on the film later on, thanks again :)
     
    FishyFish and RaglanSurf like this.
  9. Peter B

    Peter B

    Messages:
    3,287
    Name:
    Peter
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
  10. Ladystrange

    Ladystrange

    Messages:
    99
    Name:
    Claire
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Jez I never thought of looking for a manual online, thanks Peter. This one is a Sure Shot 'Date' and I dont see anything similar on the list, but now I know they're out there I'll do a Google search on it.

    The film is dated 2010, it's a Kodak Professional BW400cn. The ISO is 400. The last time I used film on a regular basis was way before I got interested in 'photography' rather that just taking pictures if you know what I mean so I've no idea if this is a good film or not. But sure it'll be fun finding out!

    Thank you again so much for your help, this really is the best bit of the TP forum!! :cool:
     
  11. FishyFish

    FishyFish

    Messages:
    1,910
    Name:
    Nige
    Edit My Images:
    No
    Unless the film has been stored badly (somewhere warm for instance), then you'll probably be ok shooting it at box speed, I reckon.

    Good luck, and don't forget to share the results! :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
    Ladystrange likes this.
  12. john.margetts

    john.margetts

    Messages:
    1,238
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    dated 2010? That is practically new. I would shoot that at box speed and develop normally. Film has a lot of latitude which will cover any slight degradation in the film.
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  13. Woodsy

    Woodsy POTY Winner 2009

    Messages:
    6,738
    Name:
    Jonathan
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Yep, as @FishyFish suggests, if it’s been stored kindly, then shoot it at box speed.

    I’m not suggesting this is in any way the best solution, but in the worst case if it’s been stored badly and you can’t force the over exposure manually, you could ask for the development to be “pushed” by a stop. This will affect the dynamic range of the resulting frame a little though, but not hugely.

    Most likely scenario though is that you can just shoot it as normal :)
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  14. futurelegend

    futurelegend

    Messages:
    68
    Edit My Images:
    No
    You taught me something thank you.
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  15. Mr Badger

    Mr Badger

    Messages:
    1,478
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    If I remember correctly, the name 'Date' usually meant that whichever model of Sure Shot it was had a 'data back', which when set would 'stamp' the date (and time) onto the film when a photo was taken. The question is, which model of Sureshot/Sure Shot is it?

    This can sometimes take a bit of working out as the same model camera was often marketed under a different name depending on which country it was sold in. Have a look at the following link and see if your camera looks the same as any of the ones pictured on here, you can then see what the name was in the EU or UK and then see if you can find a manual for it. http://global.canon/en/c-museum/series_search.html?t=camera&s=film Hope this is useful. (y)
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
    Ladystrange likes this.
  16. LancsLee

    LancsLee

    Messages:
    120
    Name:
    Lee
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    The film you have is a chromogenic black and white, so is developed using colour chemicals which means you'll have to send it off to someone for development. Good thing about this film is that when scanned you can still use the infrared dust removal such as ICE.
     
    Ladystrange likes this.
  17. Ladystrange

    Ladystrange

    Messages:
    99
    Name:
    Claire
    Edit My Images:
    Yes

    This was extremely useful @Mr Badger thank you. I think I've found it although I wont know for sure until I get home from work, but I think this is it!

    http://global.canon/en/c-museum/product/film142.html

    Again I cant thank you guys enough for all your help, and I will of course share the results, hopefully I wont mess it up too much!! LOL
     
    ChrisR likes this.
  18. Mr Badger

    Mr Badger

    Messages:
    1,478
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    No problem, Claire, best of luck with it. I don't think you can go far wrong with those Canon Shure Shots, if it's anything like the ones I've used you have to press the shutter button half way to get it to focus, then press the rest of the way to take the photo. Pressing in one go doesn't give some of them time to focus properly. (y)
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
    Ladystrange likes this.
  19. VirtualAdept

    VirtualAdept

    Messages:
    1,677
    Name:
    Mads
    Edit My Images:
    Yes
    Yep, the one or *cough* two I've had all worked like that :)
     

Share This Page