Printer page yield based on 5% coverage, is it simple arithmetic to work out how many full coverage prints can be made?

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93
Name
Stuart
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#1
The manufacturer quote the number of pages an inkjet cartridge can print based on ISO standard of 5% coverage on blank a4 paper.
Is it straightforward arithmetic dividing the number of pages for 5% by 20 to get the expected page count for 100% coverage?
I presume it is, but are there other factors to consider?
This means a full cartridge may only provide 25 to 50 full coverage a4 prints if it’s reported values are 500 to 1000 at the 5% rate

Just trying to work out realistically the ongoing costs for my printer.
 
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12,196
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Rich
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#2
Just accept its very expensive, sort of money you would only ever spend on a hobby.
Full set of cartridges for my printer is now over 100 quid, madness really, but if you enjoy it why not?

Also don't see how you can factor in the cost for print head cleaning and other maintenance functions.
 
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4,271
Name
Ian
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#3
I think like Rich said, printing from home isn't an economical business. If you already have the printer, you're stuck with the cost.

When I'm evaluating "cost to run", I look at size of tanks, number of tanks and volume of ink in the tank - making the assumption that all printers use roughly the same amount of ink per print.

As an example, my SP4800 has (8) 220ml tanks at £80 a pop (discounting ebay) which is 36p/ml vs the Canon 100-S which has (8) 13ml tanks at £10 each (excl OEM & multibuy) which is 77p/ml. That's obviously a glaring example, but you get the picture. It's actually harder to find out how much ink is in the cart than it is to discover the "coverage".
 
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