Sensor dust - Tony Northrup tweet a7r IV

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Jonathan Fussell
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#1
I see a tweet by Tony Northrup about suffering sensor dust on an a7r IV
View: https://twitter.com/tonynorthrup/status/1165985849986756608?s=19


I don't think I have ever had much of a problem with it on DSLR & mirrorless. I assumed it wasn't a problem, I remember selling cameras in the early 2000's which had new tech to fix this.

Am I confused or out of date?

Thought I would start a discussion to understand it better.

(I have found dust on digital backs but this is understandable as they are so exposed)
 
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Richard
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#2
I don't own a Sony camera so I can't comment, but I know the Canon EOS R cameras close the shutter when you remove the lens, purely to protect the sensor from dust. Why Sony can't do this I don't know
 
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jono2002
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#3
I don't own a Sony camera so I can't comment, but I know the Canon EOS R cameras close the shutter when you remove the lens, purely to protect the sensor from dust. Why Sony can't do this I don't know
This is what sounds odd to me, as Canon had sensor cleaning tech built into their DSLR's for years. Closing the shutter was not the main way of protecting it. Why they shut it now must be for some other reason like they have not got the ultrasonic cleaning of the sensor they had from the past or they do it in addition to the ultrasonic cleaning? (Can't believe they do it just for looks)
 
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#4
This is what sounds odd to me, as Canon had sensor cleaning tech built into their DSLR's for years. Closing the shutter was not the main way of protecting it. Why they shut it now must be for some other reason like they have not got the ultrasonic cleaning of the sensor they had from the past or they do it in addition to the ultrasonic cleaning? (Can't believe they do it just for looks)
The ultrasonic cleaning was never that great anyway, but a DSLR has the mirror to at least put something in front of the sensor when performing a lens change. Canon have said they close the shutter on the EOS R to protect the sensor from dust. Preventing dust getting on there in the first place is better than cleaning it
 
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#5
I think the answer may be in the original post where Tony Northrup said he has borrowed the camera so he does not know how it was previously used. After the first couple of years I used to have to wet clean my Canon EOS 20D about 4 times a year. I then bough a 5D2 which has a built in dust shaker. I had no dust issues for 3-4 years and then only had to wet clean once a year so this anti-dust system does work. I now have a 5D4 which I have owned new for 2 1/2 years but have not had to clean it yet; no sign of dust.

Dave
 
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#7
The shutter is always down, not just in DSLR, it was also in SLR film camera. My EOS 30 film camera's shutter is down when I change the film or lenses.

I don't see it as a way for it to protect the sensor, it was just the default place for the shutter to be.

Not sure who's idea was that to flip that around.....who did that first?!
 
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#8
Almost no dust issues with 2x heavily used 5D3. Ultrasonic thing works but I think the main advantage is special anti-stick sensor coating. I'd be seriously put off from Sony if they still didn't manage to get this right and may instead have to look into RF system. I don't have 5min per shot to do dust removal let alone cleaning sensor every day!
 
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#9
One IMPORTANT thing you must do when changing lenses on the Sony.

Turn off the camera before take the lens off. There is a static charge on the sensor when the camera is on which attracts dust from what I gather and turning it off first reduces the change of dust attracting to it.
 
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#10
On Fuji the sensor is also exposed when changing lenses but so far I havnt had any issues. They seem more dust resistant than the A6000.
 
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#11
Almost no dust issues with 2x heavily used 5D3. Ultrasonic thing works but I think the main advantage is special anti-stick sensor coating. I'd be seriously put off from Sony if they still didn't manage to get this right and may instead have to look into RF system. I don't have 5min per shot to do dust removal let alone cleaning sensor every day!
Just a bit of an exaggeration there. :ROFLMAO:

With any mirrorless camera you have to be a little more careful when changing lenses. Some even think the Canon mirrorless system where it cover the sensor isn't a good option as the movement can suck in additional dust and traps it there.

I have shot about 260k across 6 different Sony A7III bodies and not had to do a wet clean as yet.
 
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#13
This could be said of any ML camera, I think IBIS might have a lot to do with it as it's constantly running in the background until you switch off, and as Ray says there's a static build up - like a magnet to dust. In saying that, I have the X-H1 for about 5 months now and I've only cleaned it the once. It didn't really need it, I just did it as I had changed lenses in the wild a few times, windy conditions etc ... the cleaning fluid probably helps a lot to repel dust. A thin invisible layer left behind maybe that dust won't cling to? TN could have made the same post about any ML sensor but that wouldn't be new and controversial enough
 
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sirch

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#14
Not sure who's idea was that to flip that around.....who did that first?!
I've had MFT cameras, both Panasonic and Olympus, for around 10 years now and they have all had the sensor expossed/shutter open when the lens is off. I've never had dust problems with them or had to clean the sensor. My Canon 6D is a lot worse for dust and I assume that is because of the mirror flapping around which presumably pulls dust into the camera.
 
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#15
One IMPORTANT thing you must do when changing lenses on the Sony.

Turn off the camera before take the lens off. There is a static charge on the sensor when the camera is on which attracts dust from what I gather and turning it off first reduces the change of dust attracting to it.
Good advice for any camera actually

Just a bit of an exaggeration there. :ROFLMAO:
Not really. I had 1DSII which would get super dirty very quickly and I still have and print a lot of shots done with it. Anything at > f/11 requirea serious dusting before making any larger prints, and this may run into several minutes very easily. If Sony is anything like it I'm very reluctant to go that way. Of course those of you never exceeding f/8 will hardly notice anything.
 
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#16
In a year with A7iii I've only needed to use a blower so far which is surprising, but then I'm careful about holding the body downwards and where possible blow lenses off before attaching them.
I suspect improved inbuilt cleaning is part of the reason.
Dust on a DSLR mirror is only going to swirl about inside anyway, I think the idea mirrorless must be worse for dust is mostly a myth.
Those two in the youtube video get on my nerves anyway and often seem to be trying to put out populist rubbish
I wouldn't take much notice of anything they say.
 
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#17
I've found the A7III much less prone to dust than the D610 before it, and I do change lenses often enough. Going through those pics from Fuerteventura I've been reminded how bad the Nikon used to be by comparison.

It's been a nice surprise.
 
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jono2002
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#18
This has been interesting as based on the posts so far the Sony's are fine for some. So far I have not had any issues with my OMD em1 mkii or EP-5 not to say others have problems with Olympus?

No doubt there is other factors which causes to be so bad for like Tony Northrup in his tweet. It would frustrate me for sure.
 
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#19
What people tend to forget is dust not only gets on the sensor but also inside the body as well. This is why I don't recommend rocket blowers to clean sensors they can also stir up a lot more than they get rid of. In my opinion either clean with swaps if bad or with an Artic Butterfly for light dust

my kit and had it for years ,does it do the job ?definately and the best way I recon.

My best tip

I put a small drop of cleaning fluid onto a clean table and dip the swap into it. That way the swab does not swim in fluid which is hard to get off sensor. no other dust disturbed

 
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#21
He had dust spots on his Nikon Z review which he moaned about. Probably just careless with lens changes. Especially when it’s not his equipment. I didn’t see any other Z reviews reporting issues with it. He should probably look at his lens changing technique. Although he says its without changing lenses, probably coming from the lenses themselves, dusty bag, caps off etc.
 
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#22
I don't own a Sony camera so I can't comment, but I know the Canon EOS R cameras close the shutter when you remove the lens, purely to protect the sensor from dust. Why Sony can't do this I don't know
It’s an interesting debate what’s better. A closed shutter protects the sensor from dust but how much does it risk accidental damage to the shutter mechanism without a mirror in the front as a form of protection? As there is no mirror the depth of sensor from the lens mount is shallower than on a DSLR, it’s potentially easier to touch the shutter or sensor, which is tougher and less prone to damage the sensor surface or the shutter mechanism?
 
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#23
A shutter replacement for a Canon 5D is about £200.

I hazard a guess a sensor replacement cost more as that sits on an IBIS on the Sony with more electronics connected to it.
 
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#24
I had Canon DSLRs but not the newer ones just the old 300D, 10D, 20D and 5D. They all suffered dust bunnies but the 5D was by far the worst and was plagued with them and they'd even show up at f8 and wider. I've had mirrorless since the Panasonic GF1 came out and have had very few issues and now have GX80, GX9 and a Sony A7 and I do many lens changes in any and all conditions. Unlike an earlier poster I've found my A7 cleaning system to be quite effective but these mirrorless cameras seem to be simply vastly better than my old DSLR's and I actually can't remember when I last did a wet clean on any of them.
 

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#25
Good advice for any camera actually



Not really. I had 1DSII which would get super dirty very quickly and I still have and print a lot of shots done with it. Anything at > f/11 requirea serious dusting before making any larger prints, and this may run into several minutes very easily. If Sony is anything like it I'm very reluctant to go that way. Of course those of you never exceeding f/8 will hardly notice anything.
Perhaps go for the RF then ;)
 
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