Shipping used lithium ion batteries

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Simon
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#1
There have been a few threads on this but none conclusive so wanted to start a thread to share the key info I can find. Having switched from Sony a mount to e mount I've ended up with many spare A mount batteries, with several potential buyers, but apparently no carriers willing to transport them unless packed with the device they power.


UPS: https://www.ups.com/assets/resources/media/en_GB/pack_ship_batteries.pdf

"While all lithium batteries are classified as hazardous materials (also referred to as dangerous goods), there are exceptions for common small sizes of these batteries that simplify the rules for shipping these items by air. UPS accepts such common lithium batteries under those reduced regulations only when the batteries are packed with or contained in equipment (UN3091, UN3481).
For UPS, all air shipments of lithium ion or metal batteries shipped without equipment (UN3090, UN3480) must be fully regulated as dangerous goods, which requires a UPS Dangerous Goods contract."

...Though seems ground mail might have different, and a useful guidance doc as ever: "Non-U.S: Most ground regulations such as ADR and TDGR have exceptions for shipping small lithium batteries. Check with local regulations to ensure compliance with any local or state variations."

Royal mail: https://personal.help.royalmail.co...tricted-items---advice-for-personal-customers
"Batteries not connected to or posted with the device it is intended to power

Batteries that are classified as dangerous goods and certain used batteries (including wet spillable lead acid/lead alkaline batteries (such as car batteries), used alkaline metal, nickel metal hydride (NiMH), nickel cadmium (NiCd), zinc-air batteries, solo lithium batteries, power banks and damaged batteries of any type)

International - Not allowed in the mail
UK - Not allowed in the mail
Batteries, specifically new and used lithium batteries when not sent with or connected to an electronic device (including power banks)

International - Not allowed in the mail
UK - Not allowed in the mail
For more information on lithium batteries please see the IATA Lithium Battery Guidance Document."

IATA: (focused on air freight) https://www.iata.org/en/programs/cargo/dgr/lithium-batteries/ and https://www.iata.org/contentassets...b9/lithium-battery-guidance-document-2020.pdf

Dpd: https://www.dpdlocal-online.co.uk/prohibited-items
 
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Rich
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#3
I understood it was ok if the battery was new in its packaging with the terminals isolated.
 
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#4
I understood it was ok if the battery was new in its packaging with the terminals isolated.
Yes, new is fine, it's once amazon have got them to us and we've opened them that is problematic. Fair enough for flying but I can't believe there isn't a land courier who will do it. Yet I can't find one
 
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Andrew
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#5
Makes you wonder how Amazon et al can send you just a battery if you buy one.
The packaging is marked with a warning to indicate it contains li-ion batteries - and the delivery and return collections are handled via courier that will use ground delivery routes and should observe handling restrictions on the material and also observe procedures to deal with a damaged package.
 
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#6
Just take mine to the local Post Office, inform them that it contains a battery, that the terminals are covered and that it needs a battery warning sticker applied ... never had an issue.
 
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#7
Just take mine to the local Post Office, inform them that it contains a battery, that the terminals are covered and that it needs a battery warning sticker applied ... never had an issue.
It sounds like your post office doesn’t know there own rules. They are probably getting mixed up between sending batteries on their own connected to device, as spares within the same parcel as a device and on their own with no device.

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https://www.royalmail.com/sites/default/files/royal-mail-prohibited-and-restricted-items-nov-23-2018---23410530_updated April 19.pdf

The important part is that you can send batteries via Royal Mail if they are sent with the electronic device they are used with. Sending one for the camera and two spare batteries is ok within the UK. The problem occurs where you are sending batteries on there own with no electronic device or sending internationally. Internationally is restrict to one battery inside the device. They don’t like batteries being sent on their own and shouldn’t send a parcel of used batteries that don’t include the electronic device inside the parcel.

I have exactly the same issue, I have about 4-5 spare Nikon batteries (for D800,D810,D750,D7200 etc) but have no way to send them.
 
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#8
It sounds like your post office doesn’t know there own rules.
Wouldn't be surprised ... wonder if I'll get my recently purchased EN-EL15 battery?

(Just checked eBay listings for batteries, incrdible number offering delivery by Royal Mail.)
 
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#10
Personally don't like to flaunt the rules, think I did unknowingly in the past
Very unlikely I know, but an illicit sent battery could cause an accident on an aeroplane
Just recycle them or sell collection only, safer for all concerned and its not exactly a fortune
 
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#11
Personally don't like to flaunt the rules, think I did unknowingly in the past
Very unlikely I know, but an illicit sent battery could cause an accident on an aeroplane
Just recycle them or sell collection only, safer for all concerned and its not exactly a fortune
I would never do so where I thought the battery would travel by air, however personally I think the risk is overstated for ‘local’ delivery. Presumably my local Post Office feel the same.
 
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#13
I would never do so where I thought the battery would travel by air, however personally I think the risk is overstated for ‘local’ delivery. Presumably my local Post Office feel the same.
Some UK internal mail goes by air, personally have no idea what transport method is used
 
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#15
Royal Mail and Parcelforce are one of the few services that allow batteries of certain sizes within the UK, the parcels also need to be marked accordingly.
I can't find anything online that supports this though - I think it's more done to how knowledgeable (or ignorant) of the rules they are. If you can find a link then please to share it, but my OP has all links to the royal mail info I can find on the topic and it seems pretty clear what their rules are.
 
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#16
I can't find anything online that supports this though - I think it's more done to how knowledgeable (or ignorant) of the rules they are. If you can find a link then please to share it, but my OP has all links to the royal mail info I can find on the topic and it seems pretty clear what their rules are.
https://personal.help.royalmail.com...tricted-items---advice-for-personal-customers

They allow SLA's as long as they're under a certain size and marked with "NOT RESTRICTED" and "SPA67 / SP238" so that covers older batteries.

The wording is confusing because they list lithium as both allowed and not allowed depending on the circumstances (connected, not connected etc) although the permitted power ratings probably pose a problem for a lot of flash equipment.
 
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#17
https://personal.help.royalmail.com...tricted-items---advice-for-personal-customers

They allow SLA's as long as they're under a certain size and marked with "NOT RESTRICTED" and "SPA67 / SP238" so that covers older batteries.

The wording is confusing because they list lithium as both allowed and not allowed depending on the circumstances (connected, not connected etc) although the permitted power ratings probably pose a problem for a lot of flash equipment.
It’s very unlikely that any camera related batteries are Sealed Lead Acid (SLA) with the vast majority if not all being lithium ion, in addition the linked document describes the SLA as new.

I’ve definitely seen conflicting information regarding posting batteries, I’ve got some that will forever sit in the gadget box as it’s just too complicated to post them whilst adhering to all rules and regulations
 
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#18
https://personal.help.royalmail.com...tricted-items---advice-for-personal-customers

They allow SLA's as long as they're under a certain size and marked with "NOT RESTRICTED" and "SPA67 / SP238" so that covers older batteries.

The wording is confusing because they list lithium as both allowed and not allowed depending on the circumstances (connected, not connected etc) although the permitted power ratings probably pose a problem for a lot of flash equipment.
Where does it mention that Lithium batteries are allowed? The only mentions of Lithiums are where they are prohibited, unless they are sent with the electronic device.
 
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#19
Where does it mention that Lithium batteries are allowed? The only mentions of Lithiums are where they are prohibited, unless they are sent with the electronic device.
It doesn't state batteries on their own are allowed but as they permit them connected or not with electronic devices I think it's a broad enough term to include things such as a custom housing with its own electronics.
 
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#20
I’ve just shipped my RX1 with 3 lithium batteries after checking with the Post Office first. They confirmed that it’s fine to ship with one fitted inside the device and up to two additional batteries inside the box (so long as they’re well wrapped). They just added the lithium battery warning label to the outside of the box and shipped it.
 
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#21
I’ve just shipped my RX1 with 3 lithium batteries after checking with the Post Office first. They confirmed that it’s fine to ship with one fitted inside the device and up to two additional batteries inside the box (so long as they’re well wrapped). They just added the lithium battery warning label to the outside of the box and shipped it.
That has always been the case, same rule applies to taking on an aeroplane.
Think it says more specifically with the terminals isolated to protect against short circuit
I use the small plastic bank coin bags, even better the plastic clip on case the battery comes supplied with when new.
 

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#22
I have a professional interest in this.

Most of the advice here is correct.
Sending lithium ion batteries in or with the equipment they're designed for can be OK, so long as they're packed properly and declared.
Sending lithium ion batteries on their own, whether new or used, is not OK.

These are international rules relating to air transport. Most parcel carriers use air transport for at least some of their journeys, and it's not really practical to allow batteries on journeys that don't involve air transport because it would be difficult to communicate, enforce and police, so they just apply the air transport rules across their operation.

If the carrier only uses ground transport, then they wouldn't have to apply these rules.
 
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