Beginner Shutter speed feedback (question)

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13
Name
Gregg
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#1
Hi

Took my lad to the skate park today to try taking some pictures of movement.

IMG_1568.JPG 1/160 sec. f/7.1, 55 mm, ISO 100
IMG_1569.JPG 1/160 sec. f/7.1, 55 mm, ISO 100

I'm pretty happy with the outcome of them apart from the brightness and exposure on his coat. If I'd slowed the shutter speed down to around 1/100 sec would it have made a better picture or would it have looked more blurry and dark? What else could I have changed to make the photo better?

The camera was in AI Servo mode.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated, Thanks :)
 
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118
Name
Norman
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#2
Do you take photos in JPG or RAW format. If RAW what program do you post process with?

You could have under exposed by 1/3 - 1 stop, that may have help. You could have used spot exposure on the jacket. Or you could just manipulate the image in PS, LR, Gimp, Paintshop pro or one of the many photo editing programs.
 
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Mani_LUFC
Messages
13
Name
Gregg
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#4
Do you take photos in JPG or RAW format. If RAW what program do you post process with?

You could have under exposed by 1/3 - 1 stop, that may have help. You could have used spot exposure on the jacket. Or you could just manipulate the image in PS, LR, Gimp, Paintshop pro or one of the many photo editing programs.
Just had a look on my settings and I've been taking them in JPEG i think?

1578165221691.png

Should I be taking them in a different setting for a better picture?
 
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118
Name
Norman
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#7
Yes, best quality JPG but with RAW you do the post processing with software. I use Photoshop CC but many on here swear by Licgtroom.
 
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Mani_LUFC
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13
Name
Gregg
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#8
Yes, best quality JPG but with RAW you do the post processing with software. I use Photoshop CC but many on here swear by Licgtroom.
I've not used any photo editing software yet. Only been into the hobby for a few months and still finding my way round my camera. Learning all the time though and getting a bit better.
 
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10
Name
Julian
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#9
Hi Mani,
Yes the shot is slightly over exposed but but only by 1/3 of a stop I think. If you did change the shutter speed to 100 instead of 160 that would lengthen the exposure and let in MORE light, resulting in an even brighter photo. Remember the higher the number the shorter the exposure will be, so less light hitting the sensor.

Changing the shutter speed will do 2 things with a moving subject, freeze the movement or show it.

If you are shooting manually, the first thing to decide is do you want to freeze the action or show movement? To freeze I'd be using 1/250 minimum on a 55mm lens (so to compensate you would need a wider apature or higher iso). To show movement is be at 1/80 say and pan with the subject as I shoot. You may want to use a longer lens for this technique though as it compresses the background more and emphasizes the movement.

Depending on your beginner level, I'd put your camera in shutter priority and have a play to learn what the changes do. One more tip, kneel down next time to get level with your subject. It will totally change the look and add more drama.

Have fun

Julian
J. Stock Photography
 
Messages
118
Name
Norman
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#10
Just had a look on my settings and I've been taking them in JPEG i think?


Should I be taking them in a different setting for a better picture?
Yes, no & definitely possibly maybe! lol

While you can manipulate JPG you loose quality every edit. With RAW you have more detail so can do more with no loss of detail as you never edit the RAW file and that contains all the data unlike JPG.

Better to get it right when you take the photo but you need to learn what to expose for, in that shot expose for the jacket rather than the scene may have given the result you wanted but it can be trial & error to you 'learn'. Using RAW is more labour intensive but you get an idea what you can get from what I did.

There are a few (by few I really mean thousands, lol) on here that can get far more and much better advice than me but till they do you have something to think about.
 
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9,196
Name
Andrew Cliffe
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#11
If I was shooting this, I would have used shutter priority mode, and AI Servo Focusing mode. I would set focus mode to a specific point and then this shot is a comparatively striaightforward panning shot, where you track the little feller on his scooter, fire of a shot of two whilst continuing to pan (and like a golf swing follow through smoothly).

This way, and with some practise, you can use a fairly slow shutter speed, but your boy will be fairly sharp and in focus, and the background will be blurred.

With panning, its practice, and a good steady stance.
 
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Mani_LUFC
Messages
13
Name
Gregg
Edit My Images
Yes
#12
Hi Mani,
Yes the shot is slightly over exposed but but only by 1/3 of a stop I think. If you did change the shutter speed to 100 instead of 160 that would lengthen the exposure and let in MORE light, resulting in an even brighter photo. Remember the higher the number the shorter the exposure will be, so less light hitting the sensor.

Changing the shutter speed will do 2 things with a moving subject, freeze the movement or show it.

If you are shooting manually, the first thing to decide is do you want to freeze the action or show movement? To freeze I'd be using 1/250 minimum on a 55mm lens (so to compensate you would need a wider apature or higher iso). To show movement is be at 1/80 say and pan with the subject as I shoot. You may want to use a longer lens for this technique though as it compresses the background more and emphasizes the movement.

Depending on your beginner level, I'd put your camera in shutter priority and have a play to learn what the changes do. One more tip, kneel down next time to get level with your subject. It will totally change the look and add more drama.

Have fun

Julian
J. Stock Photography

If I was shooting this, I would have used shutter priority mode, and AI Servo Focusing mode. I would set focus mode to a specific point and then this shot is a comparatively striaightforward panning shot, where you track the little feller on his scooter, fire of a shot of two whilst continuing to pan (and like a golf swing follow through smoothly).

This way, and with some practise, you can use a fairly slow shutter speed, but your boy will be fairly sharp and in focus, and the background will be blurred.

With panning, its practice, and a good steady stance.
Thanks for the advice.

We plan on going back there tomorrow (weather dependant :rolleyes:) so will use this advice and see what happens!
 
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