Trees and interesting behaviour - crown shyness

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I love trees, I really do, love to be in a woods, watch the trees, take photos of them, hug them as well :)
Anyway! I noticed it years ago and just recently it was bugging me so much I had to look up and found out I was right!
Apparently, some of the trees species has this weird behaviour called crown shyness - their canopies do not touch each other, tend not to grow wide enough to touch other trees' branches.
Most of the time between same species, but also between different kinds too.
Have you guys notice it?
I keep checking it every time I'm in a park or woods and yeah, looks like it.
Cool :)

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Never heard of it. They say we learn something new every day. Next time I'm in the woods I'll be looking for this.
 
I have heard of it and seen it, I have also read about the connections trees have underground but only recently I found out that they can exchange nutrients and that trees will supply more nutrients to their own saplings than to other trees saplings.
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Basically trees protect themselves from insects that can transfer when touching. I read about some experiments that even "strangled" trees keep spreading their branches to the point were they are close to other trees but do not touch.
Of course they are connected with their roots underground (not all of course) but yeah, one answer tot he phenomenon is that they protect from insects.
 
Another question - do you guys photograph trees?
How do you do that?
What kind of lens do you use?
How do you frame/compose them?

I would like to start (well, already started to be honest) a collection of trees photos and was wondering how could I make those photos more attractive and interesting?
 
Some fungi are beneficial to trees, and others are harmful. Photographing trees - there's probably a spectrum from just liking them aesthetically to respecting them more completely as beings, both on the species level and as individuals. After that, it's about the light. And trusting your gut. No recipes.
 
Use the lens you've got with you. 24 - 70 is a good range to choose from, but anything goes. You're not trying to show off, you're hoping to empathise with the nature of trees.
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Trees are fantastic, although I tend to prefer shooting them around this time of year, so I can properly see the shape and form.
I have a plantation wood (very tall, very straight) just up the road from me.

Usually I would use a 10-24 on my Fuji. Just love looking up :)
 
I love being in the woods ....3 years ago I got into bonsai ....best thing I ever did and now have over 50 trees...it becomes addictive!!! Bonsai has taught me just how utterly amazing trees are
 
I love being in the woods ....3 years ago I got into bonsai ....best thing I ever did and now have over 50 trees...it becomes addictive!!! Bonsai has taught me just how utterly amazing trees are

50?! Photo or it never happened :)

Are those hard to keep/grow?
I may get one as I love trees.
 
50?! Photo or it never happened :)

Are those hard to keep/grow?
I may get one as I love trees.
Will hunt a few pics out ...... they are as easy as most plants to keep alive(a good book will keep you right) especially if you go with a native tree .....larch for example are very hardy and give some beautiful colours . There are some masters in bonsai and the trees they shape and produce are breathtaking, but that can take 30 years plus to achieve ..... peoples biggest mistake is they buy the mass produced cliche looking bonsai from b&q and keep it inside ....then wonder why it died . Its a wonderful hobby ! If you want to see some special trees go to (online) herons bonsai or greenwood bonsai and look at their specimen trees at £4000 plus!!
 
50?! Photo or it never happened :)

Are those hard to keep/grow?
I may get one as I love trees.
Not great pics but all I had on my phone
 

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Nice! :)
Are they really that expensive?
You can spend anywhere between £50 and £5000 .....or you can dig a tree up and start training it for effectively free . The expensive trees you are paying for 50 years or more of training . My oldest tree is a 36 year old Korean hornbeam. Just Google "specimen bonsai" and you'll see just how they can become literal works of art . Ohhh and they will never loose you money as they older they get the more valuable they become . A guy I buy off literally has his full retirement plan in pots in his garden
 
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