Beginner Upgrade question

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#1
I have a EOS 750d and want to upgrade to a more advanced model. I'm still learning. but want something that has a better shutter speed and ISO.
I take mainly landscapes and wildlife.
Thanks in advance for any help.
 
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#2
Unfortunately your 2 choices are diametrically opposed - Wildlife is possibly better served by a crop model to give your lenses a greater "reach" due to the crop factor but landscapes are better with a Full Frame camera for wider angles.

You can get EF-S lenses for better wide angle on a crop camera but these lenses cannot be used in a FF camera.

On balance I would say opt for a crop camera with 1.6 crop and about 16MP resolution to allow you to get a decent crop from it.
 
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Alistair
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#3
If you have a number of Canon fit lenses, the next step up would be a Canon 80D. Better AF for wildlife and very good image quality.
I don't get what you mean by "better shutter speed" though? Shutter speed is determined by your ISO and aperture. Do you mean either the speed that the camera focuses or the speed that the camera can take successive photos, ie the frames per second?

The 750D and 80D have the same number of megapixels on the sensor, but they're not quite the same.
The 750D goes 100-12800 ISO verses 100-16000 for the 80D. So the 80D will be better in lower light allowing you to have faster shutter speeds.
The 750D has 19 AF points, versus 45 for the 80D, meaning it can track moving wildlife/subjects better.
The 750D has a maximum shutter speed of 1/4000s, 80D = 1/8000s (this isn't a big problem though, some people rarely reach 1/4000th, you need very bright day for that)
The 750D does maximum of 5 frames per second, 80D = 7fps

The question is really in what way is your current camera not performing, have you reached the limit of what it can do?

Without trying to tempt you to spend more money, there's also the question of lenses. Lower budget lenses can sometimes be slower to focus (ie not helpful for fast moving subjects) and have higher minimum apertures (ie f5.6 is higher than f4) which means they don't let in as much light which means either your shutter speed needs to be a bit lower or your ISO needs to be higher to compensate.
It might be worth considering lenses before replacing the body.
 
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#4
Yes - the two areas that interest you are very different. I use a 5D4 for landscape [or my Oly but that's a different kettle of fish] and what you might term fine art and my 1DX2 for speed situations. It also depends what your budget is; I used a 7Dii before this and you might look at that. I think the 7D3 is supposed to be out soon so there will be an increase in the number of used cameras available. You might consider that too or you could hire something for a week. Again, this all depends on budget. Favourite questions to members who want to upgrade is what doesn't your camera do for you? Are you sure you are getting the most out of it? The next suggestion is often that you post images so that you can get some critique; it might help you decide if this is actually necessary for progress or just a hankering for something new. Good luck with your decision.


And that was posted in the post that came up whilst I was typing this. Alistair makes a good point about lenses... if you have EFS lenses, they won't work on FF bodies.
 
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Devon Chilli
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#5
If you have a number of Canon fit lenses, the next step up would be a Canon 80D. Better AF for wildlife and very good image quality.
I don't get what you mean by "better shutter speed" though? Shutter speed is determined by your ISO and aperture. Do you mean either the speed that the camera focuses or the speed that the camera can take successive photos, ie the frames per second?

The 750D and 80D have the same number of megapixels on the sensor, but they're not quite the same.
The 750D goes 100-12800 ISO verses 100-16000 for the 80D. So the 80D will be better in lower light allowing you to have faster shutter speeds.
The 750D has 19 AF points, versus 45 for the 80D, meaning it can track moving wildlife/subjects better.
The 750D has a maximum shutter speed of 1/4000s, 80D = 1/8000s (this isn't a big problem though, some people rarely reach 1/4000th, you need very bright day for that)
The 750D does maximum of 5 frames per second, 80D = 7fps

The question is really in what way is your current camera not performing, have you reached the limit of what it can do?

Without trying to tempt you to spend more money, there's also the question of lenses. Lower budget lenses can sometimes be slower to focus (ie not helpful for fast moving subjects) and have higher minimum apertures (ie f5.6 is higher than f4) which means they don't let in as much light which means either your shutter speed needs to be a bit lower or your ISO needs to be higher to compensate.
It might be worth considering lenses before replacing the body.
Thanks for you suggestion on looking at lenses. And the comparison between the two.
 
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Devon Chilli
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#6
Yes - the two areas that interest you are very different. I use a 5D4 for landscape [or my Oly but that's a different kettle of fish] and what you might term fine art and my 1DX2 for speed situations. It also depends what your budget is; I used a 7Dii before this and you might look at that. I think the 7D3 is supposed to be out soon so there will be an increase in the number of used cameras available. You might consider that too or you could hire something for a week. Again, this all depends on budget. Favourite questions to members who want to upgrade is what doesn't your camera do for you? Are you sure you are getting the most out of it? The next suggestion is often that you post images so that you can get some critique; it might help you decide if this is actually necessary for progress or just a hankering for something new. Good luck with your decision.


And that was posted in the post that came up whilst I was typing this. Alistair makes a good point about lenses... if you have EFS lenses, they won't work on FF bodies.
Thanks for your reply. When I look at you tube vids they seem to use an f number or a ISO I don't have I don't like the photos that I take . 1, because I do not have post production on this laptop 2, at the moment I can not get out and take any shots.
 
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Alistair
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#7
Thanks for your reply. When I look at you tube vids they seem to use an f number or a ISO I don't have I don't like the photos that I take . 1, because I do not have post production on this laptop 2, at the moment I can not get out and take any shots.
The f-stops you don't have are down to the lens.
A kit lens like the 18-55mm from Canon will only go as low as f3.5 when zoomed out to 18mm, but when zoomed in, it'll only go to f5.6.
Upgrading that lens for something like a Canon 17-55mm f2.8 or the Sigma or Tamron equivalents (which are cheaper), they will be f2.8 when zoomed out at 17mm and will still be f2.8 at the longer end 55mm.
Using an aperture (f-stop) like f2.8 or f1.8 allows more light into the camera, which is great for keep the shutter speed up, but it's also good for blurring out the background, which has the effect of emphasising your subject, this is called "depth of field" and is a key tool in the photographers tool kit.
Basically, the lower the f-stop (ie f1.8) the less is in focus (ie 'shallow depth of field), the higher the f-stop (ie f11) the more of the scene front to back will be in focus (ie a large depth of field).
One of the best lenses to try this out with is the Canon 50mm f1.8 STM. It's under £100 and will allow you to blur out the background loads.
Possibly a worthwhile investment before looking at a new camera body. And if you upgrade the camera later, you'll still be able to use it.
 
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Devon Chilli
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#8
The f-stops you don't have are down to the lens.
A kit lens like the 18-55mm from Canon will only go as low as f3.5 when zoomed out to 18mm, but when zoomed in, it'll only go to f5.6.
Upgrading that lens for something like a Canon 17-55mm f2.8 or the Sigma or Tamron equivalents (which are cheaper), they will be f2.8 when zoomed out at 17mm and will still be f2.8 at the longer end 55mm.
Using an aperture (f-stop) like f2.8 or f1.8 allows more light into the camera, which is great for keep the shutter speed up, but it's also good for blurring out the background, which has the effect of emphasising your subject, this is called "depth of field" and is a key tool in the photographers tool kit.
Basically, the lower the f-stop (ie f1.8) the less is in focus (ie 'shallow depth of field), the higher the f-stop (ie f11) the more of the scene front to back will be in focus (ie a large depth of field).
One of the best lenses to try this out with is the Canon 50mm f1.8 STM. It's under £100 and will allow you to blur out the background loads.
Possibly a worthwhile investment before looking at a new camera body. And if you upgrade the camera later, you'll still be able to use it.
Thank you for this bit of help I didn't realise that it was the lens that gave the f stops.
 
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Dave
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#9
I have a EOS 750d and want to upgrade to a more advanced model. I'm still learning. but want something that has a better shutter speed and ISO.
I take mainly landscapes and wildlife.
Thanks in advance for any help.
Before you buy anything else; what do you want a better shutter speed and ISO for?

Do you have shots where you think a better shutter speed and/or ISO would have made a difference. You said that you are still learning and also that you didn't realise 'it was the lens that gave the f stops', so I suggest holding on to your money for now. Choose a couple of shots that you are not happy with and post them post on here and someone will be able to advise.

Sometimes different gear is the answer, but often the answer is a combination of technique and practice.

Dave
 
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Devon Chilli
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#10
Before you buy anything else; what do you want a better shutter speed and ISO for?

Do you have shots where you think a better shutter speed and/or ISO would have made a difference. You said that you are still learning and also that you didn't realise 'it was the lens that gave the f stops', so I suggest holding on to your money for now. Choose a couple of shots that you are not happy with and post them post on here and someone will be able to advise.

Sometimes different gear is the answer, but often the answer is a combination of technique and practice.

Dave
Thanks Dave. I am now thinking of getting a couple different lenses instead.
 
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Darran, Daz or ****
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#12
If you have a number of Canon fit lenses, the next step up would be a Canon 80D. Better AF for wildlife and very good image quality.

The question is really in what way is your current camera not performing, have you reached the limit of what it can do?
Without trying to tempt you to spend more money, there's also the question of lenses.
I'll second this by saying I love my 80D, it's quite good with higH ISOs and I am more than happy with the photos it produces.
Again like Alistair said, I'd also take a look at lenses as you have not mentioned which ones you have.

I've done landscape and wildlife on a 450D and a 40D and too be honest, as a newer body, the 750D should be fine when paired with a decent lens.
 
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Phil
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#13
Thanks for your reply. When I look at you tube vids they seem to use an f number or a ISO I don't have I don't like the photos that I take . 1, because I do not have post production on this laptop 2, at the moment I can not get out and take any shots.
As you've already discovered, lenses make more difference than cameras, but more importantly by a country mile - is the 12 inches behind the viewfinder.

If you don't like the images you're producing; chances are that better gear won't improve them.
 
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Darran, Daz or ****
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#15
Yep im a s**t photographer
Not necessarily, what lenses do you have?
Are you photos in focus and exposure is fine?
We all start have to somewhere, for some it falls in easily and for others it takes a bit longer.
If you keep at it you'll find the reward is well worth it.
 

Defiance

Green and Hairy
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#17
You are not a bad photographer at all. A bad photographer misses shots and never asks why.

Looking at your exif data, your shutter speed is very slow both for being handheld and for a live subject.

It should be 1/200 sec or better instead of 1/4 sec. This is hard to achieve indoors unless you crank up the ISO.

Each step up of ISO is worth one stop. To get from 1/4 sec to 1/200 sec would be 6 stops and take you to ISO6400, which would degrade image quality on your camera.

So, to get the shot would require a mix of a camera body that has higher quality at a higher ISO and a faster lens f2.8 or f1.8.

An f1.8 would enable you to shoot at ISO800, which is very doable with many of the latest mid-range camera bodies.
 
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Devon Chilli
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#18
You are not a bad photographer at all. A bad photographer misses shots and never asks why.

Looking at your exif data, your shutter speed is very slow both for being handheld and for a live subject.

It should be 1/200 sec or better instead of 1/4 sec. This is hard to achieve indoors unless you crank up the ISO.

Each step up of ISO is worth one stop. To get from 1/4 sec to 1/200 sec would be 6 stops and take you to ISO6400, which would degrade image quality on your camera.

So, to get the shot would require a mix of a camera body that has higher quality at a higher ISO and a faster lens f2.8 or f1.8.

An f1.8 would enable you to shoot at ISO800, which is very doable with many of the latest mid-range camera bodies.
Thanks for the info on shutter speed.
 
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Tony
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#19
I used to use an 18-55 (kit) lens on my 77d and a sigma 18-50 f2.8, at an event I borrowed a 16-25 f2.8 L ii and the quality of pics jumped massively!! Once you realise this it makes sense why good lenses cost what they do!!

Maybe rent a lens or two and try them out before buying.
 
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