Using a Panasonic G5 for product photography

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247
Name
Ian
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#1
My amateur published photography experience has pretty much been confined to some local online news and blog stuff, as well as doing product shots for my wife's shop. Ive been asked to do some more product photography for a few local craft outlets and wanted a bit of advice.

I have a Panasonic G5 with the kit 14 - 42 and the 14mm pancake lens. Two questions:

1. Is there much an advantage in moving to a GH model for this sort of photography, where low-light etc are not much of an issue?

2. I suppose I really need to get a decent prime lens to use with the light box for the product shots - any suggestions?

Thanks!
 

Nod

Krispy and Kremey
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35,046
Name
Nod (NOT Ethel!!!)
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#2
TBH, if the final use is as web shots, pretty much anything is up to the job. Stuff in light tents tends to be slow moving so longer exposures aren't generally a problem. Unless you want a very shallow depth of field, there's no real need for a fast prime, although a proper macro lens could be useful if your wife's products are small and you need close up detail shots.

Of course, if you're after advice that'll help you justify an upgrade, there's certainly no harm in going for the upgrade you want - PM me and I'll modify this post to help with the justification!!! ;)
 
OP
OP
I
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247
Name
Ian
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#3
Thanks for the reply! Yeah - I would love to justify an upgrade with the significant other, but I suppose I need to be realistic! It is mainly web shots, although one of her associates I'm doing some photography for wants some 'products in context' type shots for use on print publicity - but I guess my set up will work for that as well (sadly).

What I really want is a new G series body with the GH series sensor and engine (not that bothered about video - especially not for the extra cost). Then I will be seeking justification!!
 
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Name
Steven
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#4
For product work almost any lens can do, but the two "specialty tools" would be a sharp "flat field" macro and a TS/PC lens.

The camera sensor doesn't matter that much other than in relation to final image size. Sometimes sensor size helps in controlling/obtaining DOF, but I don't see that as being part of this decision.

So, if you want to upgrade... a lens might be in order/justifiable.
 
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