WB Shift

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Name
Tim
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#1
Anyone using WB Shift to tweak JPGs in camera?

I'm shooting more in JPG and taking more care of WB in camera than I used to. Question is, if I set WB properly with a grey card, when is it necessary to adjust the WB shift? Or is it simply more a matter of personal preference?
 
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Phil
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#3
Horses for courses.

For my kind of photography, if I’m shooting something in a warm or cool light, then I want that reflected in my images,

Others might need more ‘accuracy’.
 
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Ned
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#4
Assume you are aiming for consistency or a specific look (or why else would you do it?) then you need to change it when the white balance of the light changes.
 
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#5
For my kind of photography, if I’m shooting something in a warm or cool light, then I want that reflected in my images,

Others might need more ‘accuracy’.
This. I used to correct white balance manually in all of my images, and then realised it took away the natural colour. If I'm shooting indoors with "warm white" lightbulbs (can't really call it's Tungsten - they're all LED bulbs now), then I want that orange tint in my images. Correcting the WB seems to result in a "harsher", colder appearance.

So I'm finding I'm now leaving WB on auto rather than correcting for the light.
 
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Alan
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#6
This. I used to correct white balance manually in all of my images, and then realised it took away the natural WB. If I'm shooting indoors with "warm white" lightbulbs (can't really call it's Tungsten - they're all LED bulbs now), then I want that orange tint in my images. Correcting the WB seems to result in a "harsher", colder appearance.

So I'm finding I'm now leaving WB on auto rather than correcting for the light.
eh?

I suppose it depends on what you want. Do you want the picture to look like how your eyes naturally saw the scene or how an electronic device naturally sees it? Sometimes a WB that strays from how our eyes naturally see (well, after the image has been processed by our brain) can look very nice but someone may object to having a purple face so you can't please everyone :D

I usually shoot raw and very often fiddle with the WB after capture if it looks unnatural but sometimes I do like the funky not as we see look too and also sometimes there needs to be a balance between what looks nice and funky and what looks natural, as in how we see it.
 
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Ned
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#7
eh?

I suppose it depends on what you want. Do you want the picture to look like how your eyes naturally saw the scene or how an electronic device naturally sees it? Sometimes a WB that strays from how our eyes naturally see (well, after the image has been processed by our brain) can look very nice but someone may object to having a purple face so you can't please everyone :D

I usually shoot raw and very often fiddle with the WB after capture if it looks unnatural but sometimes I do like the funky not as we see look too and also sometimes there needs to be a balance between what looks nice and funky and what looks natural, as in how we see it.

That’s rather the point, if you correct so that under tungsten you have “correctly” set the WB then everything will look odd.
 
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newbie1
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Tim
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#8
Thanks for all the replies. I’m asking as using the grey card results in rather clinical looking images. Adjusting color temperature I’m fairly happy with, not so sure or confident to make magenta/green tint adjustments yet.
 
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