What colour temp lamp in your editing PC desk lamp

Messages
7,931
Edit My Images
No
#1
I was not sure where to post this question.

I got a new desk lamp for Christmas and though I edit in very low to dark work area I also use the space for more general PC stuff.................in the past I have also sometimes had a lamp on but shining away from the editing monitor.

So, the question ~ the lamp can take LED (E14 type) lamps and they come in different temps:-

2700k (warm white)
4000k (cool white)
6000k (daylight)

The 2700k is a good relaxng reading lamp
The 4000k is good alt to the above and for most other tasks.
The 6000k is close to the 6500k of my calibrated screen

Therefore, for double checking prints and examining a prints colour rendition as might be needed what colour temp bulb do you use or would you choose?

TIA :)
 
Messages
3,802
Name
Ian
Edit My Images
No
#4
I would take the print into daylight if it is that critical to have the colour correct
This. Regardless of colour temp, my desk lamp just isn't enough to get proper illumination on the image. The light is often too close and falls off quickly (compared to the "sun") as well as leaving harsh glares on any non-matt paper. Prints I make in the dark (lots at this time of year) often look under-exposed until I get them into daylight.
 
Messages
1,739
Name
Brian
Edit My Images
Yes
#5
If you are editing on a computer, it's essential you use a colour calibrated monitor.

The colour temperature of the ambient lighting is only important if you are viewing prints.

As realspeed says above, viewing in natural daylight (which is usually taken as 6500K) is probably best for prints.
 
Messages
6,157
Name
Terry
Edit My Images
Yes
#6
Ideally the colour of the light should be the same as the screen calibration, so that the illuminated surroundings do not influence your perception of the screen image colours.
 
Messages
1,532
Edit My Images
No
#8
If you are editing on a computer, it's essential you use a colour calibrated monitor.

The colour temperature of the ambient lighting is only important if you are viewing prints.

As realspeed says above, viewing in natural daylight (which is usually taken as 6500K) is probably best for prints.
The colour temperature of the ambient light significantly affects the perceived white point of the monitor. The sRGB spec gives a reference monitor and environment - the further from this, the harder calibration. If calibrated for a specific environment, the monitor should be operated in that environment.
 
Top